Topic:
BUILDING CODES; SERVICE STATIONS; GASOLINE;
Location:
GASOLINE DEALERS;
Scope:
Other States laws/regulations;

OLR Research Report


September 17, 1999

 

99-R-0932

PUBLIC RESTROOMS IN GAS STATIONS

 
 

By: Veronica Rose, Principal Analyst

You asked if any state requires gas stations to have public restrooms.

We were able to identify two states (California and Texas) with such a requirement. (We searched the statutes of Washington, D.C.; the New England states; and 21 other states—Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah. We also contacted the Connecticut Petroleum Council and the American Petroleum Institute.)

California requires service stations that started operating on or after January 1, 1990 and are located within 660 feet of major highways to have clean and sanitary public restrooms. An intentional violation—one lasting for five consecutive days—is an infraction, punishable by a fine of up to $50 per day (Cal. Bus. and Prof. Code 13651 & 13652). (AB 31, currently before the legislature, defines "clean and functional" standards that restrooms would have to meet. It requires service station operators to post notices with a toll-free number for customers to report violations to the Department of Food and Agriculture. It increases the maximum fine for a violation to $250 per day.)

Texas requires filling stations to provide and maintain sanitary restrooms. A violation is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of $10 to $200. If the defendant was convicted of a violation within the previous year, the maximum fine is $1,000 (Texas Ann. Code 341.061 & 341.091).

No other state surveyed requires public restrooms in gas stations.

VR:pa