Topic:
CRIME; GUN CONTROL; WEAPONS;
Location:
WEAPONS - FIREARMS;
Scope:
Connecticut laws/regulations;

OLR Research Report


The Connecticut General Assembly

OFFICE OF LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH




April 7, 1994 94-R-0529

TO:

FROM: Veronica Rose, Research Associate

RE: CGS 29-37i and 53a-217a

You asked how many people have been prosecuted under CGS 29-37i and 53a-217a, which make criminally negligent storage of a firearm a class D felony.

There were no prosecutions under either statute in 1990, 1991, or 1992. In 1993, there were two prosecutions under CGS 53a-217a. One resulted in a conviction, the other in a not guilty verdict. The 1994 figures are not yet available.

CGS 29-37i prohibits an individual from storing or keeping a loaded firearm on any premises under his control if he knows, or reasonably should know, that a minor (a person under age 16) can get it. The requirement does not apply to an individual who:

1. keeps the firearm locked up or in a location that a reasonable person considers secure or

2. carries it on him or close enough so that he can readily retrieve and use it.

A person is criminally negligent if his failure to store the firearm properly causes a minor to use it to injure or kill himself or another. The provision does not apply if the minor obtains the firearm by unlawfully entry.

Criminally negligent storage of a firearm is a class D felony, punishable by up to five years imprisonment, a fine of up to $5,000, or both (CGS 53a-217a).

The legislation was effective in October 1990.

VR:lav