Connecticut Seal

General Assembly

File No. 112

    February Session, 2018

Senate Bill No. 314

Senate, March 28, 2018

The Committee on Children reported through SEN. MOORE, M. of the 22nd Dist. and SEN. SUZIO of the 13th Dist., Chairpersons of the Committee on the part of the Senate, that the bill ought to pass.

AN ACT CONCERNING THE ADMINISTRATION OF EPINEPHRINE AT THE DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES WILDERNESS SCHOOL.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Assembly convened:

Section 1. (NEW) (Effective from passage) (a) Any employee of the Department of Children and Families Wilderness School who is eighteen years of age or older and has satisfied the requirements of subparagraph (A)(iv) of subdivision (2) of subsection (a) of section 19a-428-6 of the regulations of Connecticut state agencies may administer epinephrine by a premeasured commercially prepared autoinjector for the purpose of emergency first aid in the absence of a written order from an authorized prescriber to a child enrolled in the school who experiences a presumed allergic reaction.

(b) The director of the Department of Children and Families Wilderness School, or the director's designee, shall ensure the maintenance of epinephrine in premeasured commercially prepared autoinjectors at the school for the purpose of emergency first aid to children who experience presumed allergic reactions and do not have a written order from an authorized prescriber for the administration of epinephrine.

(c) No employee of the Department of Children and Families Wilderness School shall administer epinephrine to a child enrolled in the school if such child's parent or guardian has submitted in writing a statement that such parent does not consent to the administration of epinephrine to such child.

(d) No employee administering epinephrine to a child pursuant to this section shall be liable to such child or a parent or guardian of such child for civil damages for any personal injuries that result from acts or omissions of such employee administering such epinephrine pursuant to this section that may constitute ordinary negligence. This immunity does not apply to acts or omissions constituting gross, wilful or wanton negligence.

This act shall take effect as follows and shall amend the following sections:

Section 1

from passage

New section

KID

Joint Favorable

 

The following Fiscal Impact Statement and Bill Analysis are prepared for the benefit of the members of the General Assembly, solely for purposes of information, summarization and explanation and do not represent the intent of the General Assembly or either chamber thereof for any purpose. In general, fiscal impacts are based upon a variety of informational sources, including the analyst's professional knowledge. Whenever applicable, agency data is consulted as part of the analysis, however final products do not necessarily reflect an assessment from any specific department.


OFA Fiscal Note

State Impact: None

Municipal Impact: None

Explanation

There is no fiscal impact associated with allowing Department of Children and Families' Wilderness School employees over age 18, who fulfill certain requirements, to administer epinephrine by a premeasured commercially prepared auto-injector to a student who experiences a presumed allergic reaction.

The Out Years

State Impact: None

Municipal Impact: None

OLR Bill Analysis

SB 314

AN ACT CONCERNING THE ADMINISTRATION OF EPINEPHRINE AT THE DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES WILDERNESS SCHOOL.

SUMMARY

The Department of Children and Families Wilderness School is a prevention, intervention, and transition program for youth located in East Hartland, Connecticut and licensed as a youth camp by the Office of Early Childhood (OEC).

This bill generally authorizes wilderness school employees over age 18 who fulfill certain training requirements (see BACKGROUND) to administer epinephrine by a premeasured commercially prepared auto-injector (e.g., EpiPen) for emergency first aid purposes to a student who experiences a presumed allergic reaction. The injector may be used without a prescription. The school must ensure that injectors are maintained on the premises for such purposes.

School employees may not administer an injector to a student if the student's parent or guardian has stated in writing that he or she does not consent to its use.

No employee who administers an injector as permitted under the bill may be held liable to the student or the student's parent or guardian for any personal injuries that result from acts or omissions that may constitute ordinary negligence in administering the injector. The immunity does not extend to acts or omissions that constitute gross, wilful, or wanton negligence.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

BACKGROUND

OEC regulations require youth camp staff members to receive training from a pharmacist, physician, physician assistant, advanced practice registered nurse, or registered nurse before administering medication to a child attending a camp. Before staff members may administer a commercially prepared auto-injector, they must additionally complete a training program on their administration taught by one of the above mentioned health professionals. After completing the initial auto-injector training, staff members must annually have their skills and competency in administering an injector evaluated by a health professional (Conn. Agencies Reg. 19a-428-6(a)(2)(A)(iv).

COMMITTEE ACTION

Committee on Children

Joint Favorable

Yea

8

Nay

5

(03/15/2018)

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