OFFICE OF FISCAL ANALYSIS

Legislative Office Building, Room 5200

Hartford, CT 06106 (860) 240-0200

http://www.cga.ct.gov/ofa

sHB-5446

AN ACT CONCERNING MINOR REVISIONS AND ADDITIONS TO THE EDUCATION STATUTES.

As Amended by House "A" (LCO 4846), House "B" (LCO 5067), House "C" (LCO 5106), House "D" (LCO 5091), House "E" (LCO 5110), House "F" (LCO 5313)

House Calendar No.: 318

Senate Calendar No.: 536


OFA Fiscal Note

State Impact: See Fiscal Note Details

Municipal Impact: See Fiscal Note Details

The bill, which makes numerous changes, related to education, results in the fiscal impacts described below.

Youth Service Bureau Grants. The bill extends the grant eligibility to youth service bureaus that applied to receive a grant during FY 18. This results in a potential revenue increase to municipalities operating youth service bureaus that would not otherwise qualify for a grant. As the youth service bureau grant is administered within available appropriation, the grant is effectively capped. If more applicants applied in FY 18, than in FY 17, the $14,000 minimum grant will be prorated accordingly. In FY 18, SDE was appropriated approximately $2.5 million in youth service bureau grants.

Medicaid School Based Child Health Program. The bill could result in a revenue loss to the state and municipalities associated with allowing for the exemption of certain local or regional boards of education with a student population of less than 1,000 students from participation in the state's Medicaid School Based Child Health Program administered by the Department of Social Services (DSS). There are approximately 55 towns with a student population of less than 1,000 students. To the extent the cost benefit analysis described in the amendment exempts a local or regional board of education, such town would experience a savings which would offset the revenue loss.

Vocational Agriculture School Enrollment. The bill results in a fiscal impact to municipalities and a potential cost to the state in FY 19, as it will increase vocational agriculture school enrollment compared to what likely would have occurred in the amendment's absence. The bill requires sending school districts to allow students to attend vocational agriculture schools in FY 19, if the students were either enrolled the previous academic year or were admitted for the FY 19 school year.

The bill is a cost to any school districts that would have otherwise prevented such students from attending vocational agricultural schools, and an equivalent revenue gain to the vocational agricultural schools. The amount of the district cost and vocational agriculture school gain is the number of such students multiplied by the district vocational agriculture school tuition. The district vocational agriculture school tuition is based on a percent of the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grant foundation amount.

The bill also results in a potential cost to the state and a potential redistribution of state funds among the vocational agriculture schools. The state grant to vocational agriculture schools is a statutory per-student amount, within available appropriations. To the extent the bill results in increased vocational agriculture school enrollment, and accordingly the state grant to those schools is increased to maintain the FY 18 per-student grant amount, a General Fund cost in FY 19 will occur. If the state grant is not increased, and vocational agriculture school enrollment rises, the vocational agriculture schools will: (1) on average, receive a lower per-pupil grant; and (2) experience a redistribution of state grant funds based on school-level enrollment changes.

Safe Haven Materials. The bill could result in a potential cost of less than $5,000 per district, to the Department of Children and Families (DCF). The bill requires DCF to provide instructional materials upon the request of a local/regional board of education, which may result in a cost to DCF for printing and distribution, to the extent that school districts opt not to use resources available for free on DCF's SAFE Havens Act for Newborns webpage. The potential cost to DCF will vary by the number of requests for materials that it receives, and the size of the requesting district.

Technical Education and Career System. The bill delays the Technical Education and Career System from becoming an independent agency, for one year. This does not result in an overall fiscal impact to the state. Without the delay, funds totaling approximately $152.9 million would have been transferred from the State Department of Education (SDE) to the new agency. Under the amendment, the funds will remain in SDE.

Provisions without Fiscal Impact. The bill makes several revisions and additions that result in no fiscal impact as the identified entities have sufficient expertise and resources necessary to carry out the requirements. Specifically the bill: (1) makes a clarifying change concerning education for opioid use and related disorders; (2) establishes a new interscholastic athletics task force; (3) requires the after school committee to submit a report on various issues; (4) adds students with disabilities to the list of data subgroups that must be included in the chronic absenteeism and prevention plan; and (5) requires SDE to identify effective truancy intervention models; and (6) requires the Children's Committee annual report card to present data indicators according to disability, which SDE will be able to provide.

House “A” strikes Section 1 of the underlying bill and eliminates its associated fiscal impact of a potential minimal cost to local and regional school districts associated with twelve hours of professional development for school nurses who are first employed after July 1, 2018. SDE would have provided this training to districts at a cost of $150 per school nurse. House “A” also requires the after school committee to submit a report on various issues, which will not result in a fiscal impact as the committee has the expertise necessary to do so.

House “B” delays the Technical Education and Career System from becoming an independent agency, for one year, which does not result in an overall fiscal impact to the state as described above.

House “C” alters Section 3 of the underlying bill, eliminating the state mandate to local and regional school districts and transferring the potential cost of less than $5,000 per district, identified in the fiscal note on the underlying bill, from them to the Department of Children and Families (DCF), as described above. House “C” also makes a clarifying change concerning opioid use and related disorders, which is not anticipated to result in a fiscal impact.

House “D” establishes a new interscholastic athletic task force, which does not result in a fiscal impact.

House “E” may result in a revenue loss to the state and municipalities associated with allowing for the exemption of certain local or regional boards of education from participation in the state's Medicaid School Based Child Health Program administered by the Department of Social Services (DSS). The fiscal impact is further described above.

House “F” makes the vocational agriculture enrollment changes referenced above, with a fiscal impact described above.

The Out Years

The annualized ongoing fiscal impact identified above would continue into the future subject to inflation.

The preceding Fiscal Impact statement is prepared for the benefit of the members of the General Assembly, solely for the purposes of information, summarization and explanation and does not represent the intent of the General Assembly or either chamber thereof for any purpose. In general, fiscal impacts are based upon a variety of informational sources, including the analyst's professional knowledge. Whenever applicable, agency data is consulted as part of the analysis, however final products do not necessarily reflect an assessment from any specific department.

Explanation

The Out Years

State Impact: None

Municipal Impact: None

The preceding Fiscal Impact statement is prepared for the benefit of the members of the General Assembly, solely for the purposes of information, summarization and explanation and does not represent the intent of the General Assembly or either chamber thereof for any purpose. In general, fiscal impacts are based upon a variety of informational sources, including the analyst's professional knowledge. Whenever applicable, agency data is consulted as part of the analysis, however final products do not necessarily reflect an assessment from any specific department.