THE CONNECTICUT GENERAL ASSEMBLY

THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

(The House of Representatives was called to order at 11: 00 o'clock a. m. , Representative Aresimowicz of the 30th District in the Chair. )

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

(Gavel) The House of Representatives will convene immediately, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives will convene immediately, members to the Chamber. Will the House please come to order. Will the members, staff, and guests please rise and draw your attention to the Dais where Rabbi Lefkowitz will lead us in prayer. Thank you, sir.

HOUSE CHAPLAIN RABBI LEFKOWITZ:

Thank you. Good morning. Dear God, keep us aware of our language when we speak. When God created the world, God created the world with words, with language, just by saying so. God spoke and the world came into being, which reminds us that we too create our world, our lives by how we speak, what kind of language we use. Through our language, we define our reputations as we remember to keep our word to our declarations and promises that we make. As an artist with a with a new canvas, we get the opportunity to create ourselves newly each and every day just by how we speak, by what comes out of our mouths.

We have two ears, two nostrils, two eyes, but only one mouth. We were given that one mouth in order that we be thoughtful with our words. As the Sages taught, in a conversation when we do not speak Holy or thoughtful words, then God, our Creator, is not present and when Holy thoughtful words are spoken, God, our Creator, dwells therein, right there in that conversation. And we are reminded that just as God is the author of creation, we too are the authors of our creation by how we speak, how we hold ourselves through our language, speak of ourselves in a positive way, that is how we will live, the world we create, and if we cannot, then we won't. As our Sage from the movie Star Wars, Yoda, said, “there is no try, only do. ” So let us remember to reflect on the blessing of speech. We say Amen.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Rabbi. Would our brand new representative, Representative Borer, I know you're up here. We're going to let our brand new, newly elected representative lead us in Pledge, but before we do that, can we just please give her a round of applause. (Applause)

REP. BORER (115TH):

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Is there any business on the Clerk's desk?

CLERK:

Yes, Mr. Speaker, the list of bills, number 39, dated March 8, 2017.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

The Majority Leader, Representative Ritter, you have the floor, sir.

REP. RITTER (1ST):

Mr. Speaker, I move that we waive the reading of the list of the bills and the bills be referred to the committees indicated.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

So ordered.

CLERK:

Mr. Speaker, the only other business is the daily calendar.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, sir. Will the Clerk please call House Calendar No. 45.

CLERK:

House Calendar No. 45, House Joint Resolution No. 101, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE BETHANY J. ALVORD OF BLOOMFIELD TO BE A JUDGE OF THE APPELLATE COURT AND A JUDGE OF SUPERIOR COURT.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Representative Tong, you have the floor, sir.

REP. TONG (147TH):

Good morning, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Good morning, sir.

REP. TONG (147TH):

I move acceptance to the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

The question before the Chamber is on acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution. Representative Tong, you have the floor, sir.

REP. TONG (147TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. This morning we will first consider the re-nomination of Bethany J. Alvord to our Appellate Court on which she has served since 2009. She has been a judge in our state court system since May of 2002 where she started as a Superior Court judge. She is a graduate of Colgate University and also home-grown at UConn School of Law.

Judge Alvord has impressed us on more than one occasion appearing before the Committee with her knowledge of the law, her commitment to public service, and in particular her commitment to her community. She has served on the Connecticut Bar Foundation and the Greater Hartford Art Literacy Volunteers and she's been a Trustee of Colin's Fund. She has three children and she is joined in life by her partner, our friend Craig Leroy. So, I wanted to give Craig a shout out here on the floor. And with that, Mr. Speaker, I urge adoption of the Resolution.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much sir. Will you remark further? The Ranking Member of the Judiciary Committee, Representative Rebimbas, you have the floor, Madam.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Good morning, Mr. Speaker, and thank you for the opportunity to rise in support of the judges before us. For all of the reasons, certainly, that the good Chairman indicated, she did pass the Committee unanimously, she was very thorough in her responses on her questionnaire, and also to the questions posed to her during the Committee public hearing, so I do rise in support of the judge before us.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Madam. Will you remark further? Will you remark further? Will you remark further? If you will not remark further on the Resolution before us, will staff and guests please come to the well? House members take their seat and the machine will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Have all the members voted?

Have all the members voted?

Have all the members voted? If all the members have voted, please check the board to ensure your vote's been properly cast. If all the members have voted, the machine will be locked, the Clerk will take a tally.

The Clerk will announce the tally.

CLERK:

House Joint Resolution No. 101

Total number Voting 138

Necessary for Adoption 70

Those voting Yea 138

Those voting Nay 0

Absent and Not Voting 11

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

The Resolution is adopted. (Gavel)

Are there any announcements or introductions? Announcements or introductions? Representative Berger of the 73rd, you have the floor, sir.

REP. BERGER (73RD):

Well, thank you, Mr. Speaker and good morning to the Chamber. Mr. Speaker, if we could clear the well of individuals that are standing, I have an introduction that I'd like to proceed with.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

We will do that sir.

Ladies and gentlemen, we're going to run through a handful of introductions. If we can give the duly elected representatives the respect they deserve and recognize the folks that they're going to be introducing to the Chamber here today. Representative Berger, you have the floor, sir.

REP. BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Seated in the well of the House, the Waterbury -- the entire Waterbury delegation is proud to have before us, as the entire General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, to congratulate the semi-pro football team, the Brass City Kings, on the winning the 3A National Championship in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on January 15, 2017. They are seated in the well, if they could just raise their hands and be acknowledged. (Applause)

The 3A thank you, Chamber members. The 3A National Championship trophy is on display here in the front in the well of the House and we will be taking some pictures in front of the National Championship trophy after we conclude the introductory remarks.

So the Waterbury delegation, again, is exceptionally honored to recognize this team from Waterbury as the only national champions from New England and on achieving a tremendously successful season, only having one loss all year.

So again, congratulations and if I could defer to Representative Reyes for a couple of introductions. There's a 45-member squad. They could not all make here today, Mr. Speaker, but we do have several names of the members of the team and coaches that are here today that we would like to recognize quickly. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, sir. Representative Reyes, you have the floor, sir.

REP. REYES (74TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and congratulations to the Brass City Kings and welcome to the House of Representatives on behalf of the Waterbury delegation, Representative Larry Butler, Representative Tony D'Amelio, Representative Stephanie Cummings, and Representative Berger, the Senator Markley and Senator Joe Hartley, it is my sincere honor and privilege to have these guys here. They're not only good football players, but they're good guys from Waterbury and the Greater Waterbury area and as Representative Berger just alluded to, these guys have won two national championships in three years.

Semi-pro football is pretty popular in the state of Connecticut and in New England and these guys have won a national champion in the NEFL as the Brass City Brawlers and they've also won a national champion, the Sunshine Bowl, as Representative Berger just alluded to, in the Sunshine Bowl in Fort Lauderdale, Florida just this past January. It is my distinct honor and pleasure -- please, I would like to have all the Brass City Kings football players, coaches, their fans, family -- I understand Mr. Knapik is here.

Please, everybody stand up. One last round of applause for the Brass City Kings, the only New England National Championship team and they are from Waterbury Connecticut. Welcome. (Applause) Mr. Chair, if I could have one minute please. Coach Knapik would like to -- he's the spokesperson for the Brass City Kings and Mr. Joe Knapik is no stranger to football. He is a Citadel graduate and quite a good football player himself, Mr. Joe Knapik.

MR. KNAPIK:

Thank you, Mr. Reyes. Mr. Speaker, thank you for having us.

REP. REYES (74TH):

I can only introduce you. Thank you, Coach. Thank you very much. Thank you.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

From one coach to another, I truly appreciate the commitment that goes into being a football coach and I understand and appreciate the commitment of the players. When it's semi-pro football, it's no longer necessarily for the money. It's no longer necessarily for the prospects of playing again someday in a higher level, it's more for the love of the game, so I appreciate all of your commitment. I commend you on your championship. Thank you. Representative Cummings, did you want to add to this? Representative Cummings, you have the floor, Madam.

REP. CUMMINGS (74TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I too wanted to echo my echo my colleague's comments. Congratulations again on being national champions, but I would be remiss if I did not elaborate on your community service. Not only are they national champions, but they're champions within our own community.

I have seen them spend countless hours volunteering on Habit for Humanity projects, helping with community and family members that need it the most, and you guys really are doing such fabulous things for the community. We very much do appreciate it and you are incredible role models for the entire Waterbury city. Thank you.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

(Applause) Thank you very much, Madam. Is there anybody I'm missing that wants to recognize the Brass City Kings? That's it. All right, are there any other announcements or introductions? Representative Cook, you have the floor, Madam. Okay. All right, Representative Santiago.

REP. SANTIAGO (130TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am here today to recognize Meriden-Wallingford Chrysalis. Chrysalis is a member program of the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence and provides crisis intervention, support services, self-sufficiency programs, safety planning, court-based assistance advocacy to victims and survivors of domestic violence and their children through community-based and housing programs.

With me, I have here Representative Mushinsky, Representative Fishbein, Representative Liz Linehan, Representative Abercrombie, Representative Buddy Altobello, and Representative Robyn Porter. She's back there, too. We are here today to recognize Chrysalis. They were incorporated in 1977 as a battered women's task force.

Chrysalis is currently celebrating its 40th anniversary and with us to celebrate this 40th anniversary, we have Executive Director Sharlene Kerelejza, she's the executive director, and Linsey Walters, Director of Programs. Let's welcome her to the Chamber and thank you, Mr. Speaker. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much for being here today and thank you for your many years of service. Are there any announcements or introductions? Representative Sanchez and I see you're joined by Representative Tercyak. You both have the floor, sirs.

REP. SANCHEZ (25TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I am honored today to introduce to you Mr. Juan Busanet, a local New Britain hero that along with a few neighbors, climbed the ladder into a burning building before officials arrived last February, saving a family including children, from a fierce blaze.

People like Juan deserve our greatest appreciation and respect. His actions not only showed his courage, but displayed his golden heart. I am proud of this young man's actions. He has already been recognized by the New Britain Common Council and today, I am pleased to present Mr. Busanet with a state citation on behalf of the New Britain delegation and the entire General Assembly.

(Applause)

Can you please join me in welcoming Mr. Busanet, his girlfriend, and his family to the House Chambers and let's give him a round of applause of appreciation of his noble act. Thank you. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, sir. That was very brave of you. When folks see a dangerous situation, there's that moment of decision. Do I run also or do I go fight, do I try to help people. You did that. We really compliment you on your actions and your bravery, sir. Thanks for coming up today. Are there any other announcements or introductions? Representative Hampton of the 16th, you have the floor, sir.

REP. HAMPTON (16TH):

Good morning, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Good morning, sir.

REP. HAMPTON (16TH):

I rise for the purpose of an introduction.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Please proceed.

REP. HAMPTON (16TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'm thrilled today to be joined by our Simsbury's Board of Education chairman -- chairwoman, Tara Donohue Willerup, and two of Simsbury's finest students, Zeke Hodkin and Dylan Fitch, who are here celebrating CABE Day at the Capitol. I'd ask my colleagues to give them a warm welcome as they advocate here in the state legislature. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Representative, and thank you for coming up to the Capitol today. Can we give them a round of applause? (Applause) Are there any other announcements or introductions? Representative Srinivasan, you have the floor, sir.

REP. SRINIVASAN (31ST):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise today for the purpose of an introduction. I've had the good opportunity to present my parents, mom and dad, to this Chamber many years ago, 2010, that's when they were here last, and in this visit of theirs, I told them that you were the speaker, Matt Ritter is our majority leader, and Themis Klarides is our minority leader and they said that before they go back to India, they're leaving this Sunday, they wanted to have an opportunity to you there, to see Matt there, and see Themis in her position there.

So that's why they're here today and I want to thank you for giving me this opportunity to introduce them back to this Chamber again and with me on this occasion, I know all of you have said that I have married up, I definitely have, and my wife and I celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary, we just did that, and along with me is our good friend, Marco Duovus, so I would request the Chambers to give all of them our traditional warm welcome. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

It is very nice to see you again. I immediately recognized you from the last time we talked. I really appreciate you came back to the Chamber and said hello to us and today being Women's Day, we're going to recognize that in a little while, but it is really nice to have a woman in leadership in Themis Karides, so I'm glad you came back to see that. Thank you. Representative Case, you have the floor, sir.

REP. CASE (63RD):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and good morning.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Good morning, sir.

REP. CASE (63RD):

For a point of introduction, please, sir?

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Please proceed.

REP. CASE (63RD):

Mr. Speaker, it is Business Day and I'm proud to have the Northwest Connecticut Chamber here with us. Up in the left hand side of gallery, there's many representatives here in the House that work with these great people, if we can all give them a warm round of applause for all the work that they do in coming out here to Hartford. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, sir, and thank you for coming up today. (Applause) Are there any other announcements or introductions? Representative Reed.

REP. REED (102ND):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My colleague, Sean Scanlon, and I are so pleased. Today is CABE Day as we heard a little earlier and some of our stellar students from Branford High School are here to greet us and I need to warn you that some of them have serious political aspirations, just so you know, they're taking notes here and they're escorted by John Prins, who's a member of the Board of Education, and their teacher, Chris Stonier, and do you want to read their names?

REP. SCANLON (98TH):

When I read your name, guys, just wave; Dylan Campos, Hailey Brunner, Luke Berner, and Brooke Soleri. It's great to have them here with us today to celebrate. They're all student government leaders from Branford High School and please join us in giving them a warm round of applause to our future colleagues from Branford High School. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you all for coming. Are there any other announcements or introductions? Representative Camillo, is that you out there? You have the floor, sir.

REP. CAMILLO (151ST):

Good morning, Mr. Speaker. I rise for the purposes of an introduction.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Please proceed.

REP. CAMILLO (151ST):

Thank you, sir. On behalf of Representative

Bocchino, Representative Floren, and Senator France, I'd like to welcome a Greenwich resident and a Greenwich High grad who is also the reigning Miss Connecticut this year who, when not competing in pageants, is very active in the community and also running half marathons, having completed four already. Let's give a warm welcome to Olga Litvinenko. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

There's the patented wave. You all saw the patented wave. That was very good and Representative Camillo, it was just a little confusing for me. I saw your name up here on the screen, I looked to the seat, but it wasn't you and low and behold, it's Miss Connecticut. Thank you very much for coming up today. We appreciate it. Are there any other announcements or introductions? Representative Zupkus of the 89th, you have the floor, Madam.

REP. ZUPKUS (89TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise for the purpose of an introduction.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Please proceed, Madam.

REP. ZUPKUS (89TH):

Thank you. As I stand here with Representative Klarides-Ditria, we would like to introduce you all to the Region 16 Student Government team. We have Anna Witkowski, Noelle Guerrar, Eric Rogg (phonetic), Gabriella Wojcik (phonetic), and Adam Murray and with them we have our superintendent, our board of ed, and we have their teacher of the student government advisory. They're here today to learn all about how student government works and the issues regarding around education, so if you would help me recognize and welcome them. Thank you. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you all for coming up today. My very good friend, Representative Ryan of the 139th, you have the floor, sir.

REP. RYAN (139TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, for the purpose of an announcement.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Please proceed, sir.

REP. RYAN (139TH):

Yes, thank you, sir. As most people know, this summer, Connecticut is going to be hosting the Eastern Regional Conference of the Council of State Governments. Today we have members of the staff if the Eastern Regional Council visiting for the next couple of days making their capitol visit. During this time, they'd like to have the opportunity to meet new legislators so that they can equate them with the organization and its function, so for that purpose, we're going to have a reception for new legislators at 3: 00 today downstairs in Room 105.

We hope you all can make it and we can see you there and you can become better acquainted with the Council of State Governments. Thank you.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, sir. Any other announcements or introductions? It's a good thing you have your name tag on. Representative Betts, you have the floor, sir.

REP. BETTS (78TH):

Good morning. Thank you very much, sir, and to expedite matters, I'm rising for the purpose of an introduction.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Please proceed, sir.

REP. BETTS (78TH):

I'd like to do this on behalf of Representative Ziogas, Representative Petit, Representative Pavalock, and myself. We all talk about how difficult it is to get up here and do businesses care about what we do. Well, I'm proud to say that we have 30 members from the Central Connecticut Chambers of Commerce up here for the entire morning for Business Day and believe me, they're very engaged, they really care a lot, and they're very constructive.

It's my honor and pleasure to introduce a very quiet bunch of people standing behind me. If you would all just say hi and I'd ask the Chamber to give them a round of applause and recognition. Thank you for coming. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you for coming today. Representative Cummings, I think this isn't the football team, but I believe you have another announcement.

REP. CUMMINGS (74TH):

Yes, Mr. Speaker, thank you. I rise for the purpose of an introduction.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Please proceed, Madam.

REP. CUMMINGS (74TH):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I rise to introduce the Waterbury Regional Chamber on behalf of the entire Waterbury delegation, Representative D'Amelio, Representative Berger, Representative Butler. The Waterbury Chamber advocates tirelessly on behalf of small businesses and they are also a great advocacy group for young professionals who are learning to make their way throughout the business community. I hope that you will rise and give them a round of applause for all the tireless work that they do in Waterbury. They are up in the galley. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

I also have the task many times of introducing other members that are there with me, so just so you don't get in trouble like I find myself, Representative Reyes also.

REP. CUMMINGS (74TH):

Yes. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

No problem. Are there any other announcements or introductions? Geez, I see a lot of women in red over there trying to get my attention. Representative Rose, you have the floor, Madam.

REP. ROSE (118TH):

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. And it is my honor to stand here today with my colleagues dressed in red to address this Chamber on International Women's Day. This is a statement that women's equality and rights are important and we will continue to move forward, not backwards, as we preserve the rights that we have won and an indication of our solidarity in our continuing fight for our basic rights, equal pay, paid family and medical leave, and access to health services to name a few.

I am pleased to say that women have made significant in-roads in Connecticut in all areas. In the political field, we follow in the footsteps of Moira Lyons, who served as our House Speaker, and currently Representative Themis Klarides that is serving as our Minority Leader.

Another influential and unforgettable female leader was the late Representative Mary Fritz. It is fitting that we remember Mary today on Women's Day. She was a proud female legislator and a force to be reckoned with. She was one of the longest serving legislators in the history of the Connecticut legislature. She was former president of the Connecticut Order of Women Legislators and as Mary once said, just think, all that from the daughter of an Irish immigrant.

I sat next to Mary in my freshman year. She taught me so much, but what stands out to me is when I struggled for my budget vote, I looked to Mary and Mary said to me, Kim, we don't vote for you here. Your constituents vote for you. Always remember your constituents when you cast your vote and I remember Mary and that sentiment every time I push my button.

Today now more than ever, we must unite as one voice to protect the rights that we have and continue to advocate issues important to women. We need to do this for all women, our mothers, our grandmothers, our daughters, and our granddaughters who will take up the mantle after us. As co-chair of the Women's Caucus, I am proud to work with my counterpart, Representative Rosa Rebimbas, and the entire caucus to move women issues forward and we will continue to fight until we reach our goals. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Madam. This morning we had a little Women's Day celebration down on the first floor of the Capitol. At that time, our Minority Leader, Representative Klarides spoke, so now I think she'll duplicate some of what she said there, but it really is a moving message. Here in the House, we're very likely, the Republican Caucus is very lucky to have their first woman Minority Leader and Representative Klarides, you now have the floor, Madam. (Applause)

REP. KLARIDES-DITRIA (105TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, you're being awfully nice to me all of a sudden. I think you want to apologize for something. It's okay. But in all seriousness, thank you, Mr. Speaker. We did have a nice opening to Women's Day downstairs today, originally called International Working Women's Day, which I think we can all find somewhat interesting. We celebrate every year on March 8th and we commemorate the movement of women's rights and I would just like to thank every woman that came before us that made it okay and it made it acceptable to do what we do.

Every time any woman in this Chamber or in this state or in this day and age has an issue with discrimination or has an issue with being looked at differently or has an issue with being talked about because of how they look and not what's in their brain or their work ethic, we should not complain about it because we need to think about all the women that came before us and that they had to do to get us here.

So I want to thank all of those women. I think the Speaker's referring to the fact that I said that I got to look at in front of a whole group of women and I don't care if there's an R or a D after their name. I don't care which part of the state they come from. I don't care what their level of education is, their level of income is. What I know is this, every one of those women does it better, does it more effectively, and does it more efficiently, sorry guys, than the men in here and the problems we have in this state, if we were running it, I don't think we'd be having those problems. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

And that was exactly what I was referring to when I knew she would repeat it and I would have to say I agree. So thank you very much, again, and it actually a very good thing that all the women showed up to work today because this building would not run without the women who come here today, so again, thank you very much. Representative Ritter, you have the floor, sir.

REP. RITTER (1ST):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I just wanted to make two announcements, the first one is about a leadership change that we're making here in our caucus and we were trying to time it for a chamber of commerce that did leave, unfortunately. With Doug McCrory, my good friend and colleague from Hartford being elevated to the State Senate recently, we've decided to make -- we've had some changes in our caucus and I'm very honored and proud to say that my good friend, Representative Michelle Cook, has been elevated to a Deputy Speaker post in this Chamber.

If we can give her a round of applause, please. (Applause) And also, Representative Kelly Luxemburg from Manchester has been elevated to a Deputy Majority Leader post, so a round of applause for her as well, too, please. Thank you. (Applause)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

I think that is it for announcements and our introductions. Will the Clerk please call House Calendar No. 30.

CLERK:

On page 1, House Calendar No. 30, House Joint Resolution 93, A RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE RICHARD E. BURKE OF MADISON TO BE A STATE REFERREE, Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Representative Stafstrom.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move approval of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the resolution.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, sir. The question before the Chamber is on acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution. Representative Stafstrom, you have the floor, sir.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, Judge Burke has been serving on our State Superior Court bench since 2001. He is currently a state trial referee, having reached retirement age, serving on the Civil Docket in New Haven. He has a long and distinguished record in our court system and also before that as an attorney.

He has been a member of many, many bars around the country and also had a long public service in the town of New Canaan before his appointment to the bench. I urge adoption.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Question before the Chamber is on adoption. Will you remark? Representative Rebimbas, you have the floor, Madam.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I do rise in support of Judge Burke before us for all of the reasons stated by good vice-chairman of the Judiciary Committee. He certainly comes with great experience to the bench. He's an asset and I also want to take this opportunity to thank him for his service to our country as well, but I do rise in his support.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Madam. Will you remark further? Representative Kokoruda of the 101st, you have the floor, Madam.

REP. KOKORUDA (101ST):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise also in support of Judge Burke. Judge Burke is a Madison resident. He and his wife are wonderful additions to the Madison community and I thank him for his service and urge your support. Thank you.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Madam. Will you remark further? Will you remark further on the Resolution before us? If not, staff and guests please come to the well of the House, members take their seats. The machine will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Have all the members voted?

Have all the members voted?

If all the members have voted, can you please check the board to ensure your vote's been properly cast.

If all the members have voted, the machine will be locked and the Clerk will take a tally.

The Clerk will announce the tally.

CLERK:

House Joint Resolution No. 93

Total number voting 145

Necessary for Adoption 73

Those voting Yea 145

Those voting Nay 0

Absent/not voting 4

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Resolution is adopted. (Gavel)

Members, if we can have everybody please take their seats. In a moment, we will begin our memorial for one of our colleagues. If I can have all members please take their seats. We will be memorializing our colleague and we're joined by her family, Representative Mary Fritz. Will members please turn your attention to the monitors.

(A video was played)

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Representative Ritter, you have the floor, sir.

REP. RITTER (1ST):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I move for the suspension of our rules for the immediate consideration of House Joint Resolution 105.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Question before the Chamber is on suspension of rules for immediate consideration of House Joint Resolution 105. Is there objection? Is there objection? Hearing none, those rules are suspended for that purpose. Will the Clerk please call and read House Joint Resolution 105?

CLERK:

House Joint Resolution 105, LCO No. 4995, RESOLUTION EXPRESSING SYMPATHY ON THE DEATH OF REPRESENTATIVE MARY FRITZ, introduced by Representative Aresimowicz, Representative Ritter, Representative Klarides, Senator Looney, Senator Duff, Senator Fasano, Senator Witkos, Representative Mushinsky, Representative Candelora, Representative Zupkus, Representative Fishbein, Representative Linehan, Senator Suzio, Senator Markley.

Resolved by this Assembly:

WHEREAS, on Saturday, July 9, 2016, the State of Connecticut and the towns of Wallingford and Cheshire lost a distinguished and beloved State Representative with the passing of Mary Fritz, at the age of seventy-eight; and

WHEREAS, she represented the 90th district with distinction for thirty-two years and to the date of her passing; and

WHEREAS, she was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on May 8, 1938, and attended Emmanuel College, Boston College, Trinity College and Fairfield University; and

WHEREAS, she was a teacher in the Wallingford Public Schools from 1959 to 1964; and

WHEREAS, she was founder of Create & Play Nursery School and taught reading in Meriden Parochial Schools; and

WHEREAS, she was Chairwoman of the Wallingford Board of Education; and

WHEREAS, she was first elected as State Representative in 1982, representing the towns of Wallingford, Prospect and Cheshire, including the Yalesville area where she lived; and

WHEREAS, she served for sixteen terms as State Representative, and served as chairman of the Public Safety, Internship and Executive and Legislative Nominations Committees, vice-chairman of the Public Health Committee, and as a member of the Judiciary, Planning and Development, Education, Energy, General Law and Legislative Management Committees and the Select Committee on Workforce Development; and

WHEREAS, she oversaw the working group on medical malpractice insurance problems from 2003 to 2005; and

WHEREAS, she also served as Assistant Deputy Speaker, Deputy Majority Leader and Deputy Speaker in the Connecticut House of Representatives; and

WHEREAS, she is survived by her husband, William W. Fritz, six children, William, Kathleen, Michael, Heather, Matthew and David and fourteen grandchildren, Will, AJ, Brady, Kaitlyn, Anthony, Jack, Mae, Cole, Aidan, Layne, Ainsley, David, Olivia and Michael.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Connecticut General Assembly expresses its sincere sympathy and heartfelt condolences on the passing of one of its honorable members, Mary Fritz, whose death is a profound loss to the House of Representatives, her family and friends, the residents of Wallingford and Cheshire and the entire State of Connecticut; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the clerks of the House of Representatives and the Senate cause a copy of this resolution to be sent to the family of Mary Fritz, as an expression of the high esteem and affection in which she is held.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Mr. Clerk. Representative Ritter.

REP. RITTER (1ST):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move adoption of the Resolution.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you, sir. The Dean of the House, Representative Mushinsky of the 85th, you have the floor, Madam.

REP. MUSHINSKY (85TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise in support of the Resolution to honor my late colleague, Representative Mary G. Fritz from Wallingford. She had two loves which were her 90th District constituents and her family, except there were actually three, the UConn women's Huskies.

That was her third love and the happiest day of her year was the day she introduced the team members to the Chamber and she actually researched each one so she could tell about the background of each player. She was passionate about education, about public safety, and about judiciary issues. She was passionate about protecting the health and wellbeing of her people in the district.

She was a high energy legislator. If you worked with her or against her, you learned this very fast. She had meticulous preparation on her legislation. She worked for the district just as hard in her -- all 16 of her terms, 32 years total, and as Deputy Speaker.

She got her start in public service as an educator, trained as a teacher, and she would do anything throughout her career for the education of children and for their eventual success as adults. She started as a civics teacher and many people in Wallingford still remember having her as a civics teacher. She then ran a nursery school and trained very young minds.

She served on the board of education and quickly rose to be chair of the board of education and when she decided to run for state representative, her constituents said this is a natural fit, it's you, go and do it and she door-knocked and worked hard as a little figure scrolling across the screen show you. That was actually from her campaign literature and door-knocking was one of her strengths in Wallingford.

She was always there for her constituents. She had office hours at her house Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Each person got their individual slot. They had her complete and undivided attention for the time period and they could candidly say what was their problem and she would work very hard to fix it. If she could not fix it herself, she would refer them to a person who could fix it.

She has an enormous list of accomplishments that people in Wallingford are very proud of and Cheshire and Prospect and I would have to be up here for four hours to go through the whole list, but she made Cheshire the bedding plant capital of the world where it is known today. She created fairness for all towns that host prisons on behalf of the rest of the towns and the state, economic fairness to them.

She worked very hard to protect the victims of domestic abuse. At one point, she collected 6,000 or more telephones, cell phones, to be reprogramed and given out to victims of domestic abuse so they could have a life line to call for help if they needed it.

She worked to create the medical malpractice law and for those who were here then, it was a big tussle between the attorneys and the doctors, but Mary's feeling was that she should write it for the person on the street, not for either side, the doctors or the lawyers, but for the person on the street, the consumer that deals with this issue.

She was on the Education Committee for 12 years and actually created the standards for high school graduation, which we take for granted today, but somebody had to write those and that was Mary Fritz. She raised the drinking age to protect young residents from death in car accidents and from damaging their young minds.

She built track and field courses for Sheehan High School and Cheshire High School, big, expensive projects which she got behind and pushed through. She worked on many school construction projects in all of her district -- all parts of her district, probably $ 30 million total in projects. She -- You've probably seen signs in the towns of a defibrillator instruction sign, many towns have those in prominent places. She's the one behind that and she created a system that a person could use one to save someone's life and not be victim of a lawsuit. They could use it as a good Samaritan and save a life and no one would prosecute them, which is a tremendous public health asset.

She was very fond of farmers and the farming community and she took the sales tax off of seeds because she argued they were double taxed. They were taxed when the plant was sold and they were also taxed when they were still a seed and she didn't think that was fair. It should be one tax at one end or the other end, but not both, which was a convincing argument.

She was actually the Legislator of the Year from the Farm Bureau, both in our region and also state-wide twice, both times for both levels. She did the first gun control law dealing with assault rifles and was kind of dismayed when manufacturer's changed the rifle slightly so that they fell out of regulation, but she was the first one that took this on as a public safety challenge.

She also worked to take guns away from domestic abusers, even if they were police officers. If they were a danger to the spouse, she wanted their guns taken away temporarily. I worked on a lot of water bills with her back in the district. She took pollutants out of local wells. She cleaned up the sewage treatment plant. She delivered drinking water for two neighborhoods in her district, Circle Drive and Yale Avenue.

She got federal funds to tear down a silver factory in her district that was leaking pollution into the neighborhoods. She had a very -- Mary had a very tight family, very strong family, unconditional love and support for anyone in her family. Her husband, Bill, was her loyal partner. He is not here today, but I hope he is watching from home, a long, loving partnership between them, a very solid couple.

This is a somewhat unusual thing he did to show his affection for her. On the 50th anniversary of their wedding, he wrote a letter to the editor of our local paper explaining why Mary Fritz was so wonderful and how proud he was of her. I mean, I've never seen anything like that, writing a letter to the editor on your wife's anniversary to say what a wonderful legislator she is.

They worked together on everything. If one of them was running for office or the other one was running for office, it was a family operation. You know about the six children and the 14 grandchildren. Some of them are here today. Here with us today are Will, Heather, David, who served many years as a first selectman, and Kathleen, and then grandchildren Kaitlyn, who is in law school and we expect her to be the next active leader in that family, and then Cole, Jack, and Mae who are young grandchildren, but they will someday be dedicated to their community, too.

I think Jill Govier and Dr. Fried are here also from her neighborhood to honor her. Back home, big turnout at her good-bye event, enormous turnout at her funeral, and we were trying to decide how to honor her in Wallingford and somebody came up with the idea of naming a school after her because education was her reason for existence, so we are -- the town is changing the name of Yalesville School to Mary G. Fritz School this spring to honor her.

And, and this is where you come in, they are setting up a scholarship fund for young women who are good students and who are active in the community because Mary believed that those would be our future leaders, so there is a Mary G. Fritz Scholarship Fund to support these young students who we think will be our future female leaders.

And anybody in here with a checkbook, I would encourage you to write a check to the Mary G. Fritz Scholarship Fund and give it to the family while they're here and you will be helping some young student, female student, to become one of our future leaders, which is a very noble cause and Mary Fritz would greatly approve of this.

So to sum up, Mr. Speaker and members of the Chamber, Mary Fritz' dedication to her town and her district and her family and her love for them were legendary. She lived a very fruitful life. She improved her state, her town, and her district and in her family, she produced a whole new generation of potential leaders.

So I hope you will join me in honoring her and I hope you will support the scholarship fund so we can send future young female leaders to help everybody in the state perform better. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Thank you, members of the Chamber.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Representative. Representative Berger of the 73rd, you have the floor, sir.

REP. BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and to the Fritz family. Thank you for coming up today for this important tribute. It's unfortunate that Billy's not able to be here with us today, but I'm sure that's he's watching. Mary Fritz, so I guess, where do I start? I guess I'm going to talk a little bit about Mary and then I'm going to talk a little bit about Mary Fritz 101.

When I first got here in 2007, I was witness to what I considered at that time, and I won't say horsemen, but the four horsewomen at the time in this Chamber and in the Senate, as Senator Hartley moved up to the Senate and I took over the 73rd District, but Mary Fritz, Jeff, your mother, Melanie, Senator Hartley and Moira Lyons, you should have seen the four of them do some work in this Chamber.

The legislation that moved through here under their watch, under very watchful eye, passed through here that benefitted not only their districts, but the state of Connecticut, and the job they did and what they did and how they worked together back then was really truly amazing and was a learning experience.

Last year for Mary, I used to try to get a hold of her every couple of weeks because we sat on Judiciary from when I first came to the legislature and I've got a couple of stories to tell you about that, but she would call me up “Berger, Berger, how ya doing and are you going to raise taxes?” This was in Finance. I said no, Mary, we're not going to raise taxes this year, but we did last year, so.

She goes “yeah, thank you for that” and she goes -- she said how is Judiciary going? Are you still raising 250 bills and having public hearings at 3 a. m. ? I said well, yes, Mary we are and she says “Representative Tong, the chairman, is he still doing the governor's bidding?” I said, “Well, Mary, I don't know. You might have to call him, but it appears that way. ” (Laughter)

But when we first got there, there was a lineup, the older members will realize this, the back, as you face the Committee, the back left corner, and it was by seniority, so you had Representative Doyle at the time, Mary Fritz, I was at the end of that line up, I was almost to the Ranking Member where the Ranking Member is now, Daniel Fox, John Wayne Fox was there, and Representative Aman at the time and we had quite a block of votes there.

And I had some question at one point in time about a bill and I said, “Mary, you know, we kind of voted no a lot in the committee back then, that group. ” I says, “Mary, you know, I don't think that I'm going to be able to vote no on this one. I think, you know, I've got to maybe look at it a little closer”, so under her counseling, I was able to make a decision to vote no and as I looked to vote, I looked to my left and that whole group was there and I saw 16 eyes fixed on me, watching what I was going to do and vote and she really held that group together back then, as she did in this Chamber in a lot of different legislation.

And last year, you know, she had a tough year and, you know, we talked and, you know, she didn't really didn't talk about it to us and, you know, she would do her work at home and she would call in and talk to the Judiciary Committee and talk to Finance, talk to Appropriations and, you know, have her staff people, you know, work on things and, you know, I talked to Representative Serra and I said, “Joe, we gotta get her to at least come to final J. F. Day” and as you saw in the video, you know, she was real sick and, you know, she was -- had a tough time getting around.

But March 30th was such a wonderful day for the Judiciary Committee that we were able to honor her and she had a chance to speak and address the Committee and now for us to remember as a General Assembly those moments and we're so very, very proud that we were able to share her on that day and just be part of that whole process that was so very, very important for all of us and the dinner that we had that we all -- most of us went to was just a great memorial and a tribute to her. I mean, she just barely was able to get up to the podium to speak, but when she got there, it looked like Coach, she got her second wind, Mr. Speaker, and she was able to carry on and deliver a very moving tribute.

And she goes “Berger, Berger”. She said “What do you think this is, a living wake?” I said “oh, no, Mary, I didn't think that. ” I mean, you know, God. Just one other bit of Mary Fritz 101 that I'd like to say and something that I learned from Mary and she sat in this seat and Representative Boukus sat here where Representative Morin is now and at the time, I believe I was chairman of Commerce, I was over there, and Mary had a little piece, a little thing for Cheshire.

She wanted it in a bill and I had a little thing for Waterbury, I know that shocks all of you, that I wanted to have in a bill, and we got it done, we voted on it here all nicey-nice, it went up the Senate, all of a sudden the bill comes back down here. Some changes were made in the Senate, that's shocking also, some changes were made and bill came back down, we voted on it, and the Waterbury piece is out and I voted for the bill and I go, “Mary, what happened?” She goes, “there's a lesson for you. There's a lesson for you, Berger.

I go, “Well, Mary, I thought, you know, we had the bill, nicey-nice, it came down, we voted on it here. ” She goes, “You know what you need to do? You have to watch the bill from beginning to end. Don't take anything for granted. If the bill goes up to the Senate, you climb those stairs and go follow it and make sure your piece stays in, because mine stayed in because I did that.

I go “okay. ” Mary Fritz 101. Okay. Again, thank you to the family. We're going to miss her. We loved her. She's a part of our life here in the General Assembly. Thank you for sharing her with us for all these many, many years. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Representative. Representative Candelora of the 86th, you have the floor, sir.

REP. CANDELORA (86TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I also rise in support of this Resolution and to offer my condolences to the Fritz family. As we've heard today, Mary was just a remarkable state representative and person and I think it's very appropriate that we are honoring her today on Women's Day because she was just such a strong individual, not just to women, but also to men, too.

And I remember when I was first elected, I think the Wallingford delegation has a very diverse delegation. We all have very different points of view, but I think we work very well together and a lot of that was because of Mary. It didn't matter if you had an R or D after your name, but you certainly had to earn her respect and she taught you how to be a good state representative.

When I first got in, I proposed a bill, and I think Mr. Jeremiah could appreciate this, but the bill was seeking to amend the tax exemption on greenhouses, so we had an issue locally in our town and I put the bill in not thinking anything of it, let's see if we could tweak it and I remember Senator Fasano calling me up and saying you've got to come to my office, so I go down to his office and he said to me, “Vin, you know, you're trampling on Mary Fritz' legacy here. She had passed this legislation. You better go talk to her because you don't want to [swearing]her off.

And he proceeded to tell me the story of how he got her angry and had to work for quite a few months to earn that back and when I approached Mary on the legislation, she looked at me and she said, “Come back to me with language and we'll talk. ” And it wasn't, you know, she wasn't territorial and I was a little taken aback, especially coming as a freshman in the Minority Party in the Chamber, she wanted to listen to me. She wanted to hear about my problem and what my constituents, the issues that we had, and it was something that I will never forget and taught me so much in this Chamber.

And so, I want to stand and just share that story with all of you, because you certainly all know what a wonderful mother and wife and grandmother that Mary Fritz was, so there's nothing that I could tell you to reinforce that, but she meant a lot to so many of us in this Chamber and her legacy will live in this building for a long time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, sir. Representative Lemar of the 96th, you have the floor, sir.

REP. LEMAR (96TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and thank you, family members, for coming and joining us today. Like so many of the speakers you'll hear from, we all loved and admired and respected more than anything Mary's persistence, commitment to this body and commitment to the state of Connecticut.

Our loss, you feel double, and I can't begin to express how much she meant to me and I can only imagine how much of a presence and a wonderful influence she was in all of your lives and so I'm happy to welcome you here today and you have my deepest condolences.

Representative Berger hit an issue that I wanted to touch on and that is what it's like to be a freshman who has a request of Mary Fritz. Now I came up and I represented at that time the town of Hamden and they had a flooding issue that required a conveyance of land. Now, I needed to build a pipe from one area down to another to get this water that was flooding and it was going to end up in this swampy area that no one was really concerned about.

I talked to the speaker at the time and he told me, of course, you'll have my support as a freshman. We'll make sure we get this done for you. So I'm feeling pretty good. I have the speaker's support on the first issue I'm going to work on. He says, “Just one thing, run it by Representative Fritz. She has a process. She's been doing it for a number of years. Talk to her and we'll get this done for you.

I'm like all right, this is great. So I go immediately to Representative Fritz' office and I'm like, you know, I just got the speaker's support for this thing. I'd love to include it in the conveyance bill. Let me know what you need. And she said, “Hold on. What's your name?”

I'm like, “Representative Fritz, I'm Roland Lemar. I'm a freshman legislator from New Haven and Hamden and this is a really important issue that I have.

“Oh, it's important is it? You have the speaker's support you say? Well, I don't care what the speaker says.

“Okay. Well what can I do to make sure that this issue gets addressed?”

“Well, the town of Hamden's on board?”

I go, “Yes, they are. They've asked me for it.

“That's good. Get a letter from them. Have their town engineer send me a letter saying why it's important.

“Okay, but like I said, I've already talked to the speaker.

“I don't care about the speaker.

I was like okay. So I get a letter from the town engineer and the town mayor. I bring it to Representative Fritz. She says, “Well, this is great, but, you know, our Majority Leader's also from Hamden. It would be great if he weighed in on this and he articulated his support as well. ” Okay, I've got the letter though and the speaker's on board and we're running out of time, like, is there anyway that I just get this language included in the bill for now?

“Well, hold on”, like, you know, “we don't want to do anything the Majority Leader's not a part of. ” Of course, all right. So she was like get him to sign on. I go okay, sure. So I run up the Majority Leader Sharkey's office and I get him to sign on and he smirks at me and he says “You're doing this for Representative Fritz, right?” And like yes, yes, she's got a lot of questions and a lot of concerns. And he just smirks at me and he's like make sure you satisfy all of those concerns.

So I'm like okay. So I run back down to Representative Fritz' office, I got the town engineer to sign on, I've got, you know, the speaker and my Hamden colleague to sign on. It's like, “You know, Representative Lemar, I think you're missing something. This might alienate some of your environmentalist community who may be concerned about the impact here. ” Like, you've got to be kidding me. Like, Representative, you said you needed language by next week. How am I going to get everybody on board? “Well, you've got to give it a shot.

So I'm like okay. So I run out, I try to get like the Sierra Club, the Connecticut League of Conservation Voters, anyone I can to sign on and I come back and I say, you know, they're on board. They don't have any objection. “Well, can you get them to send me a letter?”

Representative, like I have the speaker's support, I have the Majority Leader's support, people are signed on. It's like “I don't care about any of them. We make sure that anything we put in that bill doesn't become controversial and jeopardize everyone else's concerns.

So I go through the work, I get everyone on board. Everyone's -- there literally can be no one who's opposed to this at this point. She was like “Well, you haven't quite gotten me the official deed language that I need. Can you get the town assessor in Hamden to submit all of the information to me?”

And I am out of time. Like this bill needed to be completed and I couldn't believe it. So I finally get all of the assessor's information, I line everybody up, I got all together, I drop it off in her office and say the deadline is today at 4: 00. Can you please include this in the conveyance bill.

She's like “Of course I'm going to include it in the conveyance bill. The speaker's on board. ” And at this point, it's Mary because I've given up calling her Representative, that wasn't working for me, like, Mary, you just made me go through all of this work. The first thing I told you was that the speaker was on board. She's like, “Yes, but he won't always be.

“You won't always have the support of the environmentalist community or whatever impacted community is. You want to always have the support of your colleagues. You won't always be a freshman who are willing to do everything they can for it to help and I was always going to include this. ” I think she put it, “the most simple ask anyone's had of me, but I need to make sure that in the future, when you have needs and desires and requests, you know what the process is.

Now, I maybe softening the way she said it because she was more direct than that and I spent a lot of the next few years with Representative Frisk disagreeing with her, quite often of Judiciary Committee, but I'll never forget the important lesson that she gave me, that teacher's mindset that she had.

When she saw someone in a rush and willing to use political influence to get something done, she saw it as an opportunity to teach, to ensure that I became a better legislator, to ensure that I would pass on that lesson to other freshmen and the freshmen after them.

She will have an indelible legacy in this building because of the time she spent with each one of us, preparing for us to be the best legislator that we could be. We only have small windows into each other's hearts and souls in this building, but what I learned about her in that instance, as frustrated as I was, have served me well.

Her lessons have served the citizens of New Haven, Hamden, and East Haven well since then because it made me a better legislator and I promise you, anyone who interacted with Mary Fritz is a better person because of it and they are certainly better legislators.

So thank you so much for sharing her with us and allowing us to be a better state because of her presence. Thank you.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, Representative. Representative Morin of the 28th, you have the floor, sir.

REP. MORIN (28TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this Resolution and I just want to say to Mary's family, I hope that this outpouring that you're hearing from both sides of the aisle, I know you know how wonderful she was, but she was a great lady and a great advocate for her district and the state.

We've heard a few things and I just needed to touch base about how she taught us as legislators about this place. I had been a newly appointed chairman of the Government Administration and Elections Committee and boy, I felt like, hey, I'm a chairman now, this is great, I can get stuff done. And one of the things that falls under the perusal of that committee is the conveyance bill and I was new to the committee.

I knew Mary had done conveyance stuff, but I had gotten some prodding from maybe a co-chair and from some other people saying you need to exert your force as chair of this committee, House chair of this committee, you need to exert your power and go to the Speaker and say I want to do conveyance because it falls under my committee.

So being a dope, I went in to the Speaker and said, you know, I think it was Chris Donovan, I said Mr. Speaker, you know, I'd like to talk to you about the conveyance, you know, it falls under our committee and I go on and on and to him and he's nodding and telling me, yeah, you're right, and then he looks at me and says, you go talk to Mary about that.

Dope section two, so I go and talk to Mary and Chris is laughing at me the whole time, Chris Donovan's just smiling at me, and I go talk to Mary about it and she just looks at me and says, “No, No. ” We expected that. I didn't expect it because after all, I was chairman of GA&E and she's going to listen to me, but the cool thing that happened after that, she could've kind of gotten an attitude with me, right?

Because here I was coming in and trying -- I mean, I was respectful, don't get me wrong, because she earned and deserved that, but she knew what I was trying to do and afterwards, she could've just kind of stonewalled me and push me aside and nobody would've supported me had I pushed back on that, but what she did do is she brought me in and she taught me about how the conveyance legislation works and what you're supposed to do.

So in her way, she was giving me an opportunity to truly understand what the bill did, how to work with your colleagues to get things done, how people had to work with you to get things done, and I learned a lot of lessons during that whole process, but -- because Mary and I didn't serve on committees, when you don't serve on committees with people, sometimes you don't to get to develop the relationship that you might want to or that is normal and it helped me develop that relationship to have the opportunity to learn from her and sit down and chat with her.

And she gave me a lot of advice and I was grateful for that and so to the family, I just want you to know that she, like many others that have spoken and may well speak before, that she was very helpful to me, helping me learn the ways and maybe put me down a notch or two, which was probably a good thing for me, and thank you so much for being here. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you very much, sir. Representative Godfrey of the 110th, you have the floor, sir.

REP. GODFREY (110TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, someone said it one time that geography is destiny. Maybe that is true or not, but let me tell you, you get to be friends in this House with the people who sit next to you and Mary Fritz and I sat next to each other right up here for about ten years, so, you know, sorry for all of you who are passionate about bringing your bill out, but some of the debates get kind of boring, so you chat.

And I learned quite a bit from Mary Fritz. She'd be sitting there working on one of her innumerable quilts, she was a big quilter, she'd discuss at great length the design and the style and what she had to do, more than I probably needed to know, but I was fascinated by her fascination with that whole hobby of hers and then further in the course of all of these discussions, I learned her passion for her family. She was happiest when she was planning a wedding or a birthday party or Thanksgiving or another holiday.

Her devotion, she just glowed when she talked about her family and I'm so glad that they're all here today, Bill, how are you? I'm hope you're watching from home, but they were first in her heart and it was just a delight hearing the Fritz family stories. And of course, we saw most -- we saw in the video that infamous finger wagging that Mary was known to do, very schoolmarmish in every good sense of the word. She was teaching.

Those were all the teaching moments we've heard several people to mention to that. It was just part of her character. They were teaching moments, but she was also a mentor. She was genuinely concerned with all of the members of the House of Representatives and wanted to make sure that her long experience was past on to all of the generations that followed.

She did her homework. That's probably the highest compliment I can offer to anybody in public office. She did her homework. She knew every facet of everything she worked on, right down into the weeds, and could answer any question. And she did have a sense of humor about it. When she was doing the now famous pick-your-own legislation a few years back, we teased her unmercifully and she just took it well and usually came back with a quip that really put us in our place.

This was something she wanted to do for agriculture in Connecticut, she thought it was important, and she persuaded us all that, indeed, it was. So being a mentor, being someone who dealt with the details, whether it was pick-your-own, whether it was the conveyance bill year after year after year after year, whatever it was she was working on, she shared how to be a leader with all of us.

And of course, as I think Representative Mushinsky has already noted, she was especially a leader for women. Going back to a time when women were just beginning to break into politics and civic life and continued that right up to last year, she did it, she did it well, she was proud of it for good cause, and I think we all owe her a debt of gratitude for that.

To the family, thank you for sharing her with us, and most important please go away knowing Connecticut is a better place because of what Mary Fritz did right here in this Chamber. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you, sir. Representative Linehan of the 103rd, you have the floor, Madam.

REP. LINEHAN (103RD):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I too rise in support of today's Resolution in recognition of my dear friend, Mary Fritz, and I apologize. I'm going to try to hold it together. Mary Fritz was my mentor. Everyone here is talking about how it was Mary Fritz 101 or this is what she taught me.

I am a graduate of the school of Mary Fritz and she was a mom to me at a time when I lost my mother and that was very difficult for me and she knew my mother was sick and she knew my mother from being -- first of all, she was our representative when my parents lived in Cheshire, and she would come to the door every year. She remembered everything about my mom.

She knew we were a baseball family. I mean, she knew our family, even when I was a little girl and when it came time for me to get into politics, I let her know that I was interested and she said, “Well, first of all, thank God we've got another gutsy Irish broad” and so that made me feel great and she brought me here to the Chamber and she had me sit and she had me watch was going on and we talked a lot about the bills, but mostly that day, we talked about my mother.

And we talked about how my mother was ill and how I was taking care of her and Mary never forgot that. Excuse me. So while we took a lot of time to talk about the things that we can do for the people in our districts, she remembered that I, too, was once in her district and she knew that if I did win that election, which I didn't and that's another story, that I would be representing the people from her towns as well.

And so we went through the election cycle, this was 2012, and I did lose and Mary Fritz called me like three days after and said, “So you lost, did ya?” And I said, “Yeah, I did, Mary” and she says, “Well, we'll go over that again for you run next time” and she kept calling me and telling me, God love her, everything I did wrong. But guess what, four years later, like I said, I was a graduate of the Mary Fritz School of Politics, and here I am today and I owe a lot of that to Mary Fritz.

And one of the things that she told me after that painful loss in 2012 is she told me that I should get my feet wet at the municipal level and listen, I already lost one election because I didn't listen to everything Mary Fritz told me, so I was darn sure I was going to listen to everything after that, and I did and I started to work. I was on the town council in Cheshire and she kept in touch with me and we talked about everything that was happening and we talked about something that has become really a cornerstone of what I'm trying to do here.

And that was her -- she was a fierce advocate for domestic violence victims and for women and as Representative Mushinsky briefly spoke about, she developed a program that would -- she would take cell phones, re-program them, and give them to domestic violence victims, and I thought that was absolutely incredible and she's the one that taught me, not everything needs to be through the legislative process. You couldn't do more good just by working with people face to face.

And so now, every time I'm looking to do something in this legislature or as my job as state representative, myself and some of the people who work with me on the municipal level, Mr. Peter Talbot and Ms. Patty Flynn-Harris, all of us close friends of Mary Fritz, we say something to each other, WWMD, what would Mary do, and that has been something that has been echoing in my mind, not just since being elected to the legislature here, but since meeting Mary that first day, you know, as an adult.

And just a final word to let you all know, we all talk -- we all know how Mary was tough and it's fantastic and it gives us great stories, but I want to go back for one second to the fact that Mary walked me through the death of my mother and like many of us do when someone in our district passes away or someone we care about passes away, we do a memoriam through the legislature and that was very kind and Mary did that and she sent that, but was really great -- excuse me, is that she followed that up with a phone call and said “your mother may not be here to tell you this, so I'm going to make sure to tell you. I'm proud of you.

And so -- excuse me. I want to take a minute to thank my dear friend, Mary Fritz, up in Heaven and say Mary Fritz, I am proud of you. I am proud to know you and thank you for the generosity of your friendship. Thank you very much.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you, Madam. Representative Fishbein of the 90th, you have the floor, sir.

REP. FISHBEIN (90TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I've known the Fritz family for generally my entire life. We lived about three streets away from each other and in the summers, I would do crafts in their garage. Willie, known as little Willie, and I went to Yalesville School together and spent many, many a time in the woods catching salamanders and things like that.

Through those family connections, you can't help but get to know Mary Fritz. I wouldn't be here without Mary. She taught me at least three things; compassionate tenacity, that get-er-done attitude, and doing the right thing doesn't necessarily mean doing the party thing. Anybody who knows me knows that I don't always follow my party. I take a lot of hits for it, but it's Mary that taught me that.

I want to thank the Fritz family for sharing your wife -- I know Billy -- Mr. Fritz must be watching, if he's not watching now, he will be watching at some point, sharing your wife, your mother, your grandmother. I want to thank you for the party that you had in June, tremendous outpouring there and, you know, we all got the opportunity to speak to Mary and thank you for that.

Representative Mushinsky had mentioned that recently, and I sit on the Wallingford Town Council as well as the legislature, we had decided to rename Yalesville School, the school that Willie and I went to, after Mary Fritz. That idea actually came from Mr. Fritz. It was on the evening of Mary's wake, it was at her wake, and I was in the line and he said let's do this. I have never thought of it, fantastic idea.

The school is about, I don't know, less than a mile from their house, the house that they lived in my entire life, on Grove Street, and that night I sent an email to our council chairman and I said let's get her done and about two months later, we had done the appropriate things and we did that and I'm very, very happy that we were able to do that.

You know, Wallingford is a unique place. We've had the same mayor for approximately 32 years. He's a Republican. We have a super majority on our town council, six Republicans and three Democrats. Mary -- the portions in Wallingford that Mary has served are the most predominantly Republican areas of the town. You know, the fact that she was able to hold onto her seat that many years is a tribute to her doing the right thing.

Many times people ask me here whose seat did you take and I'm quick to tell them I didn't take anyone's seat. Mary Fritz stepped aside so that I could run. There's no way that I would be here without Mary Fritz and her tenacity and her stepping aside and with that, Mr. Chairman, I step aside to hear from my colleagues in the Memorial Service. Thank you.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you, sir. Representative Zupkus, you have the floor.

REP. ZUPKUS (89TH):

I just wanted to rise and say Mary Fritz, even though we sat on separate sides of the aisle, when we were in Cheshire, it was Republicans and Democrats, every force as one, so I just want you, your family to know that she -- and you know all the wonderful accolades that everyone has said, but no matter who you are or where you come from or what side of the aisle you sit on, we may not always agree in here, but when we were in Cheshire, whether it was the water treatment plant or getting money for the town or anything, we always worked together and she was always inclusive of me and my other fellow members, so thank you.

I learned a lot from Mary. I didn't know Mary quite like some of my other colleagues did, but for the time that I have known her over these last four years, she was really an inspiration and got a lot done through the town of Cheshire and always included me, so I'm very grateful for that and thank you for sharing her with me.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you, Madam. Our distinguished Minority Leader, Representative Klarides, you have the floor, Madam.

REP. KLARIDES-DITRIA (105TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I know we've all thanked Mary's family for sharing her with us, but I don't think you realize how important having her as part of our lives and our family was, so thank you from the House Republican Caucus. I think it's also appropriate that we are honoring Mary on Women's Day. She was one of the strongest women I know and she was strong because she was smart, she was passionate for whatever. She cared about her family, this Chamber, her constituents.

But she knew when to turn it on. She knew when to teach a lesson. She knew when to let you hang yourself. She knew when to raise her voice. She knew when not to. And that's the mark of a leader, somebody that knows what you need when you need it and when she can help you the most.

We spoke of so many women earlier that came before us that allowed us to be in this wonderful place and do this great work for the state of Connecticut. She was certainly one of those women. I want to thank her for being one of those women that paved the way for us to do what we do and I hope that I can certainly do my part to make her proud in the future. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you, Madam. Our distinguished Majority Leader, Representative Ritter, you have the floor, sir.

REP. RITTER (1ST):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and to the Fritz family, my condolences and you've heard the amazing stories about your mother, your grandmother, and they're all touching because for those who sit in this Chamber, it's hard not to laugh and remember Mary and the power and the influence she had in this caucus and in this chamber on both sides of the aisle and I have to tell two quick stories.

Like my colleagues before me, Representative Berger talked about Judiciary, I was the vice-chair of the Judiciary Committee, I was Steve, Representative Stafstrom, in my second term, and Jerry Fox was Chairman Tong, he was the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, and my job was to round up votes to make sure everyone was good when were J. F'ing bills and the Judiciary Committee is a lot -- less lawyers than there used to be, but still a lot of lawyers, right?

And so you'd think on the Judiciary Committee, you'd always be nervous about you know, the smart lawyers who might be putting this amendment together, who's working the room, and I would tell Jerry, well, I think this person's okay and this person's okay and he'd always say where's Mary, because she's the one, to Representative Berger's point, that people -- she didn't ask them and say -- you know, she didn't speak all the time, she wasn't always offering amendments, but when she did, you'd want to know because people came with her.

I think it's a good example that if you talk on every bill where every issue is your issue, you kind of do lose your colleagues a little bit. You gotta pick and chose your moments in this building and she was very, very good at that. That made her very, very effective.

And the conveyance bill, I didn't have the poor harassment that Representative Lemar had, but I can never forget that I had a little issue in Hartford in how we assessed a building, it's complicated, but Mary said, no problem, we'll do it, it only affects Hartford. It's fine. You can do it.

And so I called the LCO and I said Representative Fritz said I could do and I explained it to her and the LCO on the phone said, “We cannot do that, we will not do that, it's impossible. No town's ever done it. This would be setting a whole new standard in Connecticut law, no way. ” Not exactly non-partisan, the person just said no to me, which I was a little taken aback.

So I go over and see Mary and I said the LCO told me over her dead body will she put this in the conveyance bill. It's never been done before. She said, “Let's step outside. ” She says -- she picks up -- she says give me your cell phone, she calls the LCO and she says, “It will be section 6”. There was no more discussion about that.

And it did not change the world, but it was unique, I will certainly say that, but the LCO said if Mary's good, I'm good after telling me that it would never happen.

I went to the funeral last summer. I know the speaker was there, a lot of our colleagues were there, and it was hard not to be taken aback by the respect that I think, you know, Mary you talked about this, that the people in the town of Wallingford in particular, had for Mary Fritz. She was beloved and I'm glad they're naming a school after her, but heck, you could name the town after Mary Fritz if you wanted to.

It was really -- there was no political party. Mary was an institution and I saw that and you listened to the speakers and you'd have people just talking outside, the love and respect they have for her is amazing.

I'll end with this note that I love UConn women's basketball and men's basketball probably as much as Mary did and I was watching the game Monday night and for those of you who watched it, Katie Lou Samuelson hit ten three-pointers and she only attempted ten three-pointers. That has never happened in a women's college basketball game, it's only happened once in a men's college basketball game, and it's never happened in the NBA. It was a once in a lifetime shooting achievement.

And it's fitting that we saw that performance, that once in a lifetime performance, two days before we honored a once-in-a-lifetime, a once-in-a-generational legislature whom we all loved and adored, Mary Fritz. Thank you.

SPEAKER ARESIMOWICZ (30TH):

Thank you sir. Well, Fritz family, I hope you're getting a clear indication of how much Mary touched this chamber and all of us. I know both at the funeral and the wake, you heard from many of us. So hearing from us today in her chamber, this was her chamber, it is quite fitting. Mary and I had a special relationship. It started, as many have said before, on a conveyance issue and I learned very quickly who was in charge of the conveyance bill and I did it right from there out.

To the point where I remember a few years ago, my son was coaching the football team, which her grandson was playing on, and I was going into Wallingford to watch the game and I knew right away I had to call Mary to let her know that I was in the town because that was what I did. I didn't enter Wallingford, I was the Majority Leader then, I did not enter the town without letting Mary know I was there, because if she found out I was there and I hadn't told her, I knew I was in trouble.

And we'd talk quite frequently and we'd catch up. Last year in this very chamber, we had her favorite day of all was UConn day, when the UConn women would come up and I made sure we called over to find out if Mary could make it and we were told that she couldn't and there were family members here and we recognized them as they stood over by their chair.

Her connection with that team, the amount of homework that went in when she came out to this Dias to introduce them, she glowed. So I know we can never replace Mary. She's deep in our hearts, but we did reach out the UConn women's team and they presented us with a basketball that we're going to present to the family on behalf of Mary and I think it's quite fitting what they write; we appreciate that Representative Fritz was always on our team.

So Willie, I know I was down to your office when you were an elected official down in Clinton, you had a lot of UConn stuff, but this really is going to go into the history books and I hope family memorabilia that Mary Fritz' presence is even still felt by the UConn women's team that has 107 victories, the record, the profound impact she had. So again, thank you all so very much for sharing this incredibly courageous, passionate, occasionally stern, woman with us.

If I could have the Majority Leader and the Minority Leader come grab the basketball and present it to the family. You might drop it, Representative. Representative Ritter believes a pass is a shot that goes off the rim and somebody gets it, so.

So the question remaining before the Chamber is on adoption of the Resolution. When we do these types of Resolutions, we typically do it by a moment of silence. In this particular case, given the love for their Huskies and their courageous run that they're on, if we can have all the members stand up and we're going to act upon this Resolution by just saying UConn, so I'll try to get us going. On the count of three we'll go -- we'll say UConn together and that will be Mary Fritz, hopefully, she'll hear us. One, two, three -- UConn.

The resolution is adopted. The House will stand at ease.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The Chamber will come back into session. The Chamber recognizes Representative Albis.

REP. ALBIS (99TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move for the suspension of our rules for the immediate transmittal of House Joint Resolutions 30, 45, and 105 to the Senate.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. The question on suspension of the rules for immediate transmittal of House Joint Resolution 101, 93, and 105, is there objection to the suspension of the rules? Is there objection? Hearing none, the rules are suspended for an immediate transmittal to the Senate. Any announcements or introductions? Announcements or introductions? Representative Boyd of the 50th.

REP. BOYD (50TH):

Mr. Speaker, I rise for the purpose of an introduction.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Please proceed.

REP. BOYD (50TH):

Mr. Speaker, I'm very honored -- first of all, this is my first time addressing the entire House and it's not nearly as scary as it looks on television. Secondly, it is my honor to represent the town of Union here in the General Assembly. For those of you who don't know, Union is the smallest town in the state of Connecticut. Union has just about 800 residents and today, the Union school took the time to come up here to be part of the CABE Day on the Hill and earlier, the Wolves of the Union School led the march to the Capitol with that.

So up in the balcony, we have representatives of the Union School; if you guys can stand and if members of the House could join me in welcoming them here to the Chamber and their time here on the Hill as well. (Applause)

The Union School District may very well be the smallest school district in the state of Connecticut, but I can say with confidence that they are the proudest and they have had a long history of great academic success, so I appreciate the Chamber welcoming them here and I thank you, Mr. Speaker, for your time.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Any further announcements or introductions? Representative Gentile.

REP. GENTILE (104TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise for an introduction.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Please proceed.

REP. GENTILE (104TH):

With me today, I have my husband John, who is here visiting with one of the members or our Democratic Town Committee and one of my constituents, Tarek Roslian, and this is his first time in the Chamber, so please join me in giving them a warm welcome. (Applause)

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative Gentile and welcome to the Chamber on this wonderful day. Any further announcements or introductions? Any further announcements or introductions? Seeing none, the Chamber will return to the Call of the Calendar. Will the Clerk please call House Calendar No. 32.

CLERK:

On page two, House Calendar No. 32, House Joint Resolution No. 97, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE RICHARD N. PALMER OF WEST HARTFORD TO BE AN ASSOCIATE JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT AND A JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Mr. Clerk. The Chamber will recognize Representative Tong of 147th District.

REP. TONG (147TH):

Good afternoon, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Good afternoon, sir.

REP. TONG (147TH):

And thank you for that one last time channeling Representative Fritz. I got a virtual finger wagging there.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

So very appropriate, thank you.

REP. TONG (147TH):

I move acceptance to the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is on acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution.

REP. TONG (147TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Today, we consider the re-nomination of Justice Richard Neal Palmer for a fourth term on our State Supreme Court. Justice Palmer is one of the most accomplished and distinguished jurist in our state, perhaps the most experienced.

I was doing the math on my fingers during the hearing. He joined the Court almost 24 years ago at the age that I am now and has served with great distinction since then. Justice Palmer is a home-grown lawyer and jurist, went to Trinity College, UConn Law School, and then went on to one of the most really distinguished and extensive legal careers.

He practiced at Shipman and Goodwin. He had his own firm, but also served in the U. S. Attorney's Office, first as an assistant and then went on to be the United States Attorney for the District of Connecticut. After that, he went and took the state analog of that job and served as a chief state's attorney here in Connecticut.

So he's touched, it seems, almost every significant law enforcement job here in the state as a prosecutor. Justice Palmer has served as the senior associate justice and really one of the most experienced senior voices on our Court for some time and has written and been a part of many of the seminal decisions of our day.

Justice Palmer's hearing went on for several hours and I will say that in my 11 years in the legislature and on this committee, I think this was one of the most rigorous, searching, tough sets of questions that any nominee has faced, much less a Supreme Court justice. I think the Committee really did its job and I was proud of the Committee that day for pushing Justice Palmer on his decision-making process, on his philosophy, and how he regards the legislature and I think his responses were forthright and honest and I think he proved to many members of the Committee that he deserves reappointment.

So with that, Mr. Speaker, I urge adoption of the Resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Representative Rebimbas of the 70th, esteemed Ranking Member of the House.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, good afternoon and it's good to see you there.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Good afternoon, Madam.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

And Mr. Speaker, I must admit, even in the absence of Mary Fritz, you've been behaving in Judiciary, so I certainly like to acknowledge that.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

I do my best, Representative.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, we do have before us Justice Palmer on his re-nomination and certainly as the Good Chairman has indicated, he comes with great experience and knowledge. I am proud of the Judiciary Committee in vetting all judges that come before us and certainly many questions were posed to Justice Palmer.

He took his time to make sure that those responses were thorough to the questions that were posed. There was considerable inquiry regarding any type of notion of activism or not following the letter of the law in certain decisions that have been issued and authored by the Court and Justice Palmer himself.

Again, he responded to those questions. There were also considerable questions posed to Justice Palmer regarding his demeanor, his demeanor not only with litigants in front of him, but certainly in decisions that have been issued.

Myself, specifically, as well questioned Justice Palmer as to what the reasoning was to what I would call be uncharacteristic in maybe not the most professional, polite words towards other justices on the Court.

Whether or not an individual -- and you know this goes in any type of workplace environment, whether or not you get along with your colleagues, whether or not you differ in opinions with your colleagues, still your colleagues deserve respect. Your colleagues deserve to certainly be spoken to when appropriate, but any time that there is any type of attacks in writing of decisions, I do not believe it's appropriate.

I and many others share that perspective because when any party or attorney looks to judgments, this decision of a court, they're looking for a decision that they can use moving forward in case law, maybe even influence any type of legislation when appropriate.

But those decisions are so important for what comes to follow that you want to make sure that it's professionally done, that's well written, and that one can follow it.

When we start having justices put in their allegations against one another, then we, as the members of the Judiciary Committee must inquire on them, so if there's any allegation of a justice not following protocol, not following the letter of the law, not doing what their duties and responsibilities are, then of course when they come before the Judiciary Committee, when we are vetting them and it's our duty and responsibility to ask those tough questions.

But it's also our duty and responsibility to point out when we feel that someone has fallen less to their duties and responsibilities. I have to admit, I did have some concerns regarding individual's moral compass if you can't tell yourself, self-reflection, that your choice of words in a decision may be inappropriate. It's enough to certainly put the public perspective about the Supreme Court in a different light.

That is not what they're there to do. They are to analyze the law, they are to provide very informative detailed decisions. That's what we expect from them. That's what we ask from them. As to their disagreements, they put that into a dissent in the most professional way. Anything more or less should be left in the chambers. We do it all the time in a variety of different ways. We ask that our justices do the same.

I do, Mr. Speaker, rise in support of Justice Palmer because I do believe that he did take the time to answer his questions -- answer the questions that were posed to him. I do believe that at the end of the public hearing, there was a sense of acknowledgement that it's possible that there could have been a better choice of words, maybe even words that were unnecessary in any type of decision to convey one's personal opinion regarding how other justices reach their decisions.

And again, I'm a true believer in individuals standing up and defending the Court, as we many times defend the legislature, but I do believe that decorum and respect is always well afforded to our colleagues and that any personal opinions regarding whether or not someone has crossed the line should be left to personal conversations and not in decisions.

With all that, Mr. Speaker, again, I do rise in support of Justice Palmer because of the fact that we are looking at one or two decisions in the course of an entire career that I do believe that he has offered great experience and knowledge and insights and courage in other decisions that he's issued, so I do support his nomination here today.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you very much, Representative. Would you care to remark further? Representative Petit of the 22nd, sir.

REP. PETIT (22ND):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Just a brief statement, I rise in opposition to the re-confirmation of Justice Palmer. I do not believe it is appropriate for judges, especially Supreme Court Justices, to legislate and attempt to set policy from the bench.

We expect our judges to fairly interpret our laws and not politicize their decisions. I also oppose this reconfirmation on the basis of his judicial demeanor. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, sir. Would you remark further? Representative Gonzalez of the 3rd. Madam, you have the floor.

REP. GONZALEZ (3RD):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this nomination and I will say I have some colleagues asking me if I'm really supporting this judge. I think there's a perception there that I am after all the judges and that's not true. Committee members spoke against reappointing Judge Palmer for activism outside the bench and legislating from the bench.

In particular, they went against him because of a reversal of decision based on new evidence. He explained why he reversed the decision during the hearing. I don't know how many times he repeated over and over and over why he reversed that decision.

But this was a shock to me because the reason why they was speaking against Judge Palmer is what I've been talking about maybe for 10 years, 11 years now. I've been complaining about judges legislating from the bench.

I do my homework. I bring transcripts, but that doesn't matter for some members of this chamber, but this was a victory for me in a way, that they went against Judge Palmer because of the activism from the bench. I would say, this is a victory for me because now I know the members of the Judiciary Committee, they know that that is going on in our court system, even if they support me or not.

Members here protect bad judges before they protect our parents. However, I was also confused and I'm confused because I have no record of any negative things about this judge. I have no complaint against this judge, never heard anything bad about this judge from attorneys or parents or anybody.

We know that we have a lot of our parents from family court, they go to appellate court to appeal the decision and never receive any complaint. When I speak against a judge, it's because of a pattern, and I know that one of my colleagues told me the other day, well, you have to be sure that you can explain or show a pattern that they don't follow the law.

With respect to Judge Palmer, I actually receive letters from attorneys that support Judge Palmer and they said he has a record of following the Constitution and the Rule of Law.

We also heard from our State Attorney Kevin Kane, who everybody knows him in this chamber, he is very well respected by the members of the Chamber and he speaks very highly about Justice Palmer. Attorneys pointed out there that there are many judges and justices that exhibit justice activism from the bench every single day.

There was a case where a judge was very clear saying if that's the way the law is, it shouldn't be that way and he went ahead and made the decision, ignoring the law. So how many other judges are doing the same thing and why we're not considering that when we support or speak against reappointment.

Many attorneys are saying that they have full faith that Justice Palmer always follows the law. I speak against a judge when I have proof and transcripts that provide information that support the complaints that I receive and I don't see the reason why one decision that he did explain over and over and over, why that's just a reason to get rid of a good judge when we have judges, that we have 10, 50, 100 people that come and testify in this building and nobody listened and with no results.

I don't think it's right, I don't think it's fair just for one decision. Yes, he made a comment about one of his colleagues. It happened to be a Latino judge. I was disappointed, yes. I was very disappointed, but just for one decision, one comment, I don't think that's reason for us to get rid of a judge that we know what he is a good judge. I urge my colleagues to support Judge Palmer and again, people were surprised I was getting up to support the judge and I always say I will support the good judges and I will go after all the bad judges. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative Gonzalez. Would you care to remark further? Would you care to remark further on the Resolution before us? If not, staff and guests please come to the well of the House. Will members please take your seats. The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted?

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted? Will the members please check the board and determine if your vote has been properly cast? For all the members who have voted, the board will be locked and Clerk will take a tally.

Will the Clerk please announce the tally?

CLERK:

House Joint Resolution No. 26. I'm sorry. House Joint Resolution No. 97.

Total number of Voting 147

Necessary for Adoption 74

Those voting Yea 101

Those noting Nay 46

Absent/not Voting 2

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

(Gavel) The Resolution passed. The Chamber recognizes Majority Leader Ritter.

REP. RITTER (1ST):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move to suspend the rules for the immediate transmittal of Calendar 32 to the Senate.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Question on suspension of the rules for immediate transmittal to the Senate. What's your objection to suspension of the rules? Is there objection? Hearing none, the rules are suspended for immediate transmittal to the Senate. Representative Ritter.

REP. RITTER (1ST):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and if I could just have the Chamber's attention for one moment please. It will not be long and you'll understand why I'm asking for this privilege. It deals with one of our members. If again I could just ask for quiet in the Chamber please for one second, for one second please. (Gavel).

If you noticed, there was an absent vote from our colleague, Representative Kelly Luxenberg, today and we found out this morning and it's with a very heavy heart that I announce that her father, David, passed away earlier this morning. He was a longtime educator, obviously a wonderful father and stepfather and grandfather and Kelly will not be us today, but if we could stand for a moment of silence for her and her family, it would be much appreciated.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Majority Leader Ritter. The Chamber will come back to the Call of the Calendar. Will the Clerk please call Calendar No. 31.

CLERK:

On page one, Calendar No. 31, House Joint Resolution No. 94, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE JAMES P. GINOCCHIO OF FAIRFIELD TO BE A JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The Chamber recognizes Representative Stafstrom.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move approval of Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution. Representative Stafstrom, you have the floor.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, Judge Ginocchio has a long and distinguished service to our state. Beginning in the early 1980s he served for almost two decades in our state's public defender's office. He was originally appointed to the bench in 2001 and has served with distinction since. He has served in a variety of contexts, including as the administrative judge up in the Litchfield Judicial District and in the Torrington Juvenile Court.

He is currently back in the Bridgeport area serving in the juvenile court in Bridgeport, hails from that area, obviously a resident of Fairfield, an alumnus of Fairfield University undergraduate and the University of Bridgeport School of Law.

He was a gentleman and I know outside of the courtroom, he has been of service to the court and to the bench and as of recently escorted many of the members of the Bridgeport Regional Delegation around a tour of the Bridgeport Juvenile Courthouse. I urge my colleagues' support.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The Chamber recognizes Representative Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of Judge Ginocchio. He has served the state of Connecticut with distinction. He is well respected by his colleagues and we certainly did have quite a bit of testimony and support of his demeanor and expertise, as well as being detailed in his decisions, so I do rise in support of Judge Ginocchio.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative Rebimbas. Would you care to remark further? Would you care to remark further on the Resolution before us? If not, will staff and guests please come to the well of the House. Will members please take their seats. The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted? Will the members please check the board to determine if your vote has been properly cast? If all the members have voted, the board will be locked and the Clerk will take a tally.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Will the Clerk please announce the tally.

CLERK:

House Joint Resolution No. 94

Total number Voting 147

Necessary for Adoption 74

Those voting Yea 147

Those voting Nay 0

Absent/not Voting 2

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Resolution passes. (Gavel).

Will the Clerk please call House Calendar No. 46, 4-6.

CLERK:

House Calendar 46, House Joint Resolution No. 102, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE ANGELO L. DOS SANTOS OF EASTFORD TO BE A SENIOR JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, sir. The Chamber recognizes Representative Stafstrom.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move approval of Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is on acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution. Representative Stafstrom, you have the floor.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, Judge Dos Santos was originally appointed to the bench in 2001. He is an alumnus of the UConn School of Law, as well as UConn undergrad. He has served with distinction on the Superior Court bench, mainly in the Windham and Tolland Judicial Districts. He continues to serve in the Windham Judicial District.

He's a very active member of the state's Portuguese community, having served on the Portuguese American Bar Association and with the Portuguese Club of Hartford. I urge my colleagues support.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Representative Rebimbas, this candidate is very near and dear to your heart.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

That is correct, Mr. Speaker, as you often are correct.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Please proceed.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Mr. Speaker, I do rise in strong support of the nominee before us. It's certainly my honor to support the re-nomination of the very first judge appointed in the state of Connecticut of Portuguese descent. As a state legislator of Portuguese descent, it is a great honor to see responsible, active individuals throughout Connecticut, and specifically the Portuguese community, do such a great job and provide service back to the state of Connecticut.

He has certainly received numerous awards for his dedication and service. He has received a lot of support for his re-nomination and I want to take the opportunity to thank him for being an inspiration to the state of Connecticut in providing the service that he does on the bench and I do support his re-nomination as a judge referee. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Would you care to remark further? Would you care to remark further? Would you care to remark further? If not, will staff and guests please come to the well of the House. Will members please take your seats? The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted? If all the members have voted, please check the board to determine if your vote has been properly cast. If all the members have voted, the board will be locked and the Clerk will take the tally.

Representative Soto, the reason you rise in the Chamber. Representative Porter. Representative Porter, the Chamber recognizes you, Ma'am.

REP. PORTER (94TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise to make the announcement that inadvertently hit Representative Soto's button when voting on this judge and I just wanted to make that acknowledgement that I have voted in the affirmative. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative Porter. Representative Soto, the Chamber recognizes you.

REP. SOTO (39TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and my vote remains in the affirmative and thank you to my colleague, such an upstanding representative, for making that correction.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative Soto. The Clerk will make that notation. The machine has been locked and the Clerk, please take the tally.

Will the Clerk please announce the tally.

CLERK:

House Joint Resolution 102

Total number of Voting 147

Necessary for Adoption 74

Those voting Yea 147

Those voting Nay 0

Absent/not Voting 2

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Resolution passes. (Gavel)

Will the Clerk please call House Calendar No. 47.

CLERK:

House Calendar No. 47, House Joint Resolution No. 103, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE CARL E. TAYLOR OF WEST HARTFORD TO BE A JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, sir. Representative Conley.

REP. CONLEY (40TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is the acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution. Representative Conley, you have the floor Ma'am.

REP. CONLEY (40TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Judge Carl Taylor is an excellent judge out of West Hartford. He currently sits in Rockville and he's been doing criminal work for the last few years. He's been a judge since 2001 and in his spare time, he does an awful lot of work with West Hartford Youth Lacrosse League. He has been associated with that league since 1982, helping 150 to 200 youths in the town of West Hartford to compete in lacrosse. He's an excellent judge and he should be reappointed.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Representative Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of Judge Taylor for all of the reasons Representative Conley highlighted, as well as did want to note that he also passed the Judiciary Committee unanimously and did have several letters of support, so I do rise in support of his re-nomination.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Ma'am. Would you remark further on the candidate before us? Would you remark further on the candidate before us? If not, staff and guests please come to the well of the House. Will members please take your seats? The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted? Members please check the board to see if their vote has been properly cast. If all the members have voted, the board will be locked and the Clerk will take a tally.

Clerk, please announce the tally.

CLERK:

House Joint Resolution 103

Total Number Voting 147

Necessary for Adoption 74

Those voting Yea 146

Those voting Nay 0

Absent/not Voting 3

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Resolution is adopted. (Gavel).

Will the Clerk please call Calendar No. 48.

CLERK:

Calendar No. 48, House Joint Resolution No. 104, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE HEIDI G. WINSLOW OF NEWTOWN TO BE A SENIOR JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you. The Chamber recognizes Deputy Speaker Pro Tempe Bob Godfrey.

REP. GODFREY (110TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Good afternoon.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Good afternoon, sir.

REP. GODFREY (110TH):

I move acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report on adoption of the Resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution. Please proceed, sir.

REP. GODFREY (110TH):

Thank you, sir. Judge Winslow is a graduate of Wellesley College where she got her Bachelor's degree back in 1969. She also holds a degree from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 1976 and was admitted to the Bar later that year. She has been a judge of the Superior Court for many years, since about 2001, if my memory serves me well, and she has received very high marks, indeed, from the Bar who has -- who regularly evaluates judges.

She is very well known for her judicial temperament. I have known her personally since long before either one of us got involved in politics when I was serving on a commission in the city of Danbury when I came back from my service in the Navy. She was working at that time with Legal Aid doing a great job of representing her clients.

She is a superb judge and I urge my colleagues to vote in favor of her confirmation now as a senior judge of the Superior Court. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, sir. Representative Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I do rise in support of Judge Winslow, certainly for all of the reasons already stated by the Good Deputy. Judge Winslow is a very detailed, thorough judge. She did a great job in responding to questions posed to her in our committee. She has a longstanding experience with family law and certainly welcomes the tough cases as many other judges shy away from them.

We certainly need judges with long history of handling tough matters, to continue to hear those tough matters, and she certainly, as already been stated, has been evaluated and received very high remarks from those evaluations because of the fact that she is very detailed and thorough in her analysis of matters that come before her, so I am rising in support of Judge Winslow.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Representative Smith of the 108th, sir.

REP. SMITH (108TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, rise in support of Judge Winslow, having practiced in the Danbury Bar area for well over 30 years. She has been a great member of the Danbury Bar and a great asset to our bench and I urge my colleagues to continue her support and great work on the judiciary bench. Thank you so, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative Smith. Representative Bolinsky of the 106th. Sir, you have the floor.

REP. BOLINSKY (106TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I also rise in strong support of the re-nomination of Heidi Winslow for judge in the Danbury Circuit Court. Judge Winslow has served honorably for 16 years. Her preference is family court issues because she is a very concerned person and she enjoys learning about each individual cases and litigant's situations and working through issues with them, so on behalf of the Newtown delegation, myself, Representative Sredzinski, and Representative Duff, we stand in strong support. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Will you remark further? Will you remark further? Will you remark further on the candidate before us? If not, will staff and guests please come to the well of the House? Will members please take your seats? The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted? Will members please check the board to see if your vote has been properly cast? If all members have voted, the board will be locked and the Clerk will take a tally.

Clerk, please announce the count.

CLERK:

House Joint Resolution 104

Total number Voting 146

Necessary for Adoption 74

Those voting Yea 144

Those voting Nay 2

Absent/not Voting 3

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Resolution passes. (Gavel)

Chamber recognizes Representative Albis.

REP. ALBIS (99TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move for suspension of our rules for the immediate transmittal of all items awaiting for the business of the Senate.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. The question on suspension of the rules for the immediate transmittal of House Bills to the Senate, is their objection to suspension of the rules? Is there objection? Hearing none, the rules are suspended for immediate transmittal to the Senate. Representative Albis.

REP. ALBIS (99TH):

Yes, thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules for the immediate consideration of Senate Joint Resolutions 40 through 47.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question of suspension of the rules for immediate consideration of Senate Joint Resolutions 40 through 47, is there any objections of the suspension? Is there any objection? Hearing none, seeing none, the rules are suspended for the immediate consideration of Senate Joint Resolutions 40 through 47.

Will the Clerk please call Senate Joint Resolution 40.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution No. 40, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE EMMET L. COSGROVE OF NEW LONDON TO BE A SENIOR JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Mr. Clerk. Representative Conley, for what purpose do you rise?

REP. CONLEY (40TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move for acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution. Representative Conley, please proceed. You have the floor, Ma'am.

REP. CONLEY (40TH):

I move this in concurrence with the Senate, Mr. Speaker, but Judge Cosgrove's been an excellent judge in the New London County. He currently sits on the New London Judicial District. He will be taking senior status. He did take senior status in December of this -- month, much to most of the local practitioner's dismay, as we didn't realize his age.

Judge Cosgrove has taken an effort with young lawyers in the New London Bar to make sure that we are known by others to introduce new faces and we greatly appreciate him and his service to the New London Bar.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. (Gavel)

If the Chamber could please keep the level of conversation down within the Chamber, if you have sidebars, would you please take those sidebars outside the Chamber so we can hear the candidates before the Committee? Representative Rebimbas, please proceed.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise before you in support of Judge Cosgrove, who for certainly all the reasons stated, and she did pass Judiciary unanimously, so I do rise in the judge's support.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Thank you very much. Would you care to remark further? Representative Soto of the 39th, you have the floor, sir.

REP. SOTO (39TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I just rise in support of Judge Cosgrove, as well. He's one of our great judges in the city of New London and I also support his nomination.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Will you remark further? Remark further on the candidate before us? Remark further? If not, will staff and guests please come to the well of the House? Will members please take their seats? The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted? Will the members please check the board to see if your vote has been properly cast? If all the members have voted, the board will be locked and the Clerk will take the tally.

The Chamber recognizes Representative Borer of the 115th, Ma'am.

REP. BORER (115TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd like to be recognized as the affirmative in the vote.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. The Clerk please note the Representative in the affirmative. The Clerk please re-take the tally. Clerk, please announce the tally.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution 40, in concurrence with the Senate

Total number Voting 146

Necessary for Adoption 74

Those voting Yea 146

Those voting Nay 0

Absent/not Voting 3

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Senate Joint Resolution 40 passes in concurrence with the Senate. (Gavel)

Will the Clerk please call Senate Joint Resolution 41.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution 41, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF GREGORY T. D'AURIA, ESQUIRE, OF AMSTON TO BE AN ASSOCIATE JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT AND A JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Representative Tong, House Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, sir.

REP. TONG (147TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is on acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report in concurrence with the Senate, is that correct?

REP. TONG (147TH):

In concurrence with the Senate, Mr. Speaker, I apologize for that.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, sir. Please proceed.

REP. TONG (147TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We have before us the nomination of Mr. Gregory D'Auria to serve as a justice of the Supreme Court. Mr. D'Auria currently serves in the Attorney General's Office as the state's chief appellate lawyer and also as the solicitor general of the state of Connecticut. In that role, he argues on behalf of the State and the people of the state on really the most consequential Constitutional issues of the day when the State is a party or needs to be heard.

Mr. D'Auria is a graduate of both UConn on the undergraduate level and also of the law school, practiced at Shipman and Goodwin for a while, and then he moved to Office of the Attorney General, where he has served for much of his career.

We had an excellent opportunity to sit with him and to talk with him about why he wanted to serve, but in particular, I asked him how he has spent most of his career and much of the last many years on the seventh floor of the Attorney General's Office in the rarified air of the Appellate Courts and the appellate practice and I asked him whether he had a way to stay in contact with the people of this state and the issues and challenges and the problems they face every day and he assured us that in his practice as an assistant attorney general that he interfaces directly with litigants and people who have challenges with the state and in their everyday lives and also in his work outside of being a lawyer, he acts as a coach.

He is also active in his church and the YMCA of downtown Hartford. And so I think Mr. D'Auria brings to us a real depth of experience. He's, you know -- to talk to him, he's a very down-to-earth and straightforward and honest person, but also it's clear that he is of eminent quality as a lawyer, as a thinker, and the Committee, I think, showed that we have great confidence in him as a jurist, so with that, I move adoption of the Resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Representative Rebimbas, Ranking Member of the Judiciary Committee. You have the floor, Ma'am.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I do rise in support of Attorney D'Auria for the Connecticut Supreme Court. I want to first commend him for taking the time to meet with the leadership of the Committee and certainly answered a lot of our questions and as the Good Chairman had indicated, he is very well qualified absent having served on the bench prior to.

And certainly that was part of the questions that we had for him, not only in private, but also in open during the public hearing. I think he does bring a world of knowledge and experience and certainly having seen arguments and participated in arguments before the Supreme Court, it gives him a unique perspective also of the analysis that takes place, the importance of the decisions that come down from that court, as well as a judicial demeanor.

Certainly I think he exhibited, during our public hearing as well as our meetings, a very good demeanor and willingness and certainly an able ability to serve on the bench, so I do rise in his support and congratulate him on his nomination to the position and I do believe he will be able to serve us in this capacity in a great way, so I do rise in his support.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Madam. Care to remark further on the candidate before us? Care to remark further on the candidate before us? If not, staff and guests please come to the well of the house? Will members please take your seats? The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted? If all the members have voted, please check the board to see if your vote has been properly cast. If all the members have voted, the board will be locked and the Clerk will take a tally.

Will the Clerk please announce the tally.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution 41, in concurrence with the Senate

Total number Voting 145

Necessary for Adoption 73

Those voting Yea 145

Those voting Nay 0

Absent/not Voting 4

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Senate Joint Resolution passes in concurrence with the Senate. (Gavel)

Chamber, please stand at ease.

Chamber will come back from being at ease. Will the Clerk please call Senate Joint Resolution 43.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution No. 43, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE HOLLY ABERY-WETSTONE OF WEST HARTFORD TO BE A JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report of Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Representative Tong.

REP. TONG (147TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, I move acceptance to the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is on acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate. Please proceed, sir.

REP. TONG (147TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The governor has nominated Holly Abery-Wetstone for a third term on the Superior Court. Judge Wetstone serves in the Juvenile Court in the New Britain Judicial District. She's a graduate of the University of St. Joseph in West Hartford and also the Western New England School of Law.

Judge Wetstone has served with distinction for many years here in our state and has served in the community on the Connecticut Bar Foundation, the Gaylord Hospital Board of Trustees, also the president of the Hartford Association of Women Attorneys. Judge Wetstone answered extensive questioning in the Judiciary Committee and I urge adoption of the Resolution.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative Tong. Representative Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of Judge Wetstone's re-nomination. I thought that she did an excellent job at answering the questions that were posed to her, very tough questions as well, and she showed great professionalism and demeanor in her responses and certainly, again, her evaluations, she has high remarks in that regard and many letters of support.

So she was very thorough and detailed and I do rise in support of her re-nomination.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative Rebimbas. Do you care to remark further? Do you care to remark further on the candidate before us? The Chamber recognizes Representative Gonzalez of the 3rd. Madam, you have the floor.

REP. GONZALEZ (3RD):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. People will say that I go against family court judges, only family court judges, but that isn't where -- that is where I get the most complaints and those complaints are very often supported by court transcripts. More than once, I have heard that the complaints -- all those complaints are lies by people with vendetta or agendas against the judges.

But I know they're not lies. The complaints are not by one or two people, but many, many parents, 10, 15, 100 parents came to the Capitol and have waited hours and hours to be able to testify. Why do they -- What do they have to gain by this? Why will they go out of their ways to spend all that time here in the capitol, it's not because they want to lie.

These parents are desperate because they feel no one is listening to their complaints and they are alone. These parents are not asking for us to change the decision in their cases. They are voicing their concern about reappointing judges that are abusing their power. They know this place is not the appellate court.

These families, they are not ignorant. They know about the process. This place is their only hope. These parents, they pay their taxes, and they are voters. They are our constituents and by the way, I think there are more constituents from any -- for reps out of Hartford than from Hartford.

I do not get up in the Committee or the Chamber to speak against a judge without documented record of complaints, even if others disregard those complaints. It's easier for members of the Chamber to listen and believe these judges that it is not for them to believe. It's easy for members of the Chamber to believe in these judges than believe these parents.

Some of the judges are a problem and they will continue being a problem until we stop rubber-stamping these bad judges. That brings me today to Judge Wetstone. Complaints and concerns against the judges are numerous and they back to at least 2009. The complaints include being biased against parents in the family court system. When it comes to visitation and custody issues against pro se litigants, they do not behave in a professional treatment of parents and many others complain.

Many times, parents they go into her court with an agreement, come out in disagreement. She doesn't listen to both sides of the case and she is biased toward attorneys she doesn't like. She makes decisions based on what parent can earn in the future, not what a parent is earning at the time of the case. You cannot decide cases based on future earning potential.

If a case that doesn't include neglect or abuse, why is a decision made for no visitation or supervised visitation paying thousands and thousands of dollars? In 2009, one of her comments was we need more guardians ad litem in the court because we need cool heads.

But now, how can parents be forced to have a guardian ad litem when they cannot even afford an attorney, much a less a guardian ad litem. She recommended, she commented, on the occasional level of parents, by stating that while parents may have been successful at college or spent time with their children and helped them with the occasional sport, that doesn't translate well into parenting.

Those types of comments do not belong in the court. She does not make decisions based on the best interest of the child. She makes decisions based on what the guardian ad litem wants and the best interest of the guardians ad litem. She stated in 2009, the guardians ad litem, they were a Godsend to the court.

It is very clear that for this judge, what is more important to the court are the guardians ad litem and the financial benefit. She ordered a mother to set up a visit with a family counselor and when she did, this mother found out that he was not a counselor. He was a sophomore college student acting as a family counselor at $ 150 dollars an hour. This student told this mother that he charged $ 150 dollars an hour, that she has to meet with him as many times as he ordered or he will notify the judge and the judge will hold her in contempt of court.

And he was very clear, I don't accept checks. You gotta pay me only cash. She was paying $ 500 dollars a week just to go and see a student. How you can you send a parent to be counseled by someone with no qualifications? This is very clear that this judge is not in the best interest of the child.

Again, it's very, very clear that it's about the best interest of the guardians ad litem and their pockets. This is an abuse of power. Some members of the Chamber are saying that we have to show a pattern in order to get rid of a judge. Well, a parent came to testify and they proved with transcript their testimony. They proved that it's a pattern. Not just one parent, we have a lot of parents, and their testimonies are almost the same.

Why do we have to prove here a pattern. I think the parents are already doing that. This is a bad judge. Let's send a message to all these judges.

REP. KLARIDES-DITRIA (105TH):

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Yes, Representative Klarides.

REP. KLARIDES-DITRIA (105TH):

I rise for a Point of Order.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Please proceed, Ma'am.

REP. KLARIDES-DITRIA (105TH):

Representative Gonzalez is engaging in improper debate by characterizing a member of the Judiciary as, should I start the list -- a bad judge, only concerned about money, on and on and on. This has been a continuous abuse by this member of the Judiciary, of other members of this Chamber. We live by the rules of this Chamber. We disagree, we argue, but we believe in this process. There cannot be one rule for one member and one rule for everyone else.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Chamber, please stand at ease.

The Chamber will come back to order. The esteemed Minority Leader of the House makes a very solid and valid point about the decorum in this Chamber amongst its members and amongst the outside comments made to outside members or candidates before this committee. This Chamber looks at that very seriously and considers that very, very seriously and will intend to counsel members as to the importance of that decorum now and into the future. Thank you, Madam Minority leader.

The Chamber recognizes Representative Gonzalez.

REP. GONZALEZ (3RD):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. What I said about the members of the Chamber, I've been saying that it's no for me even though if I've got proof, there's no support when I bring those issues up. But I'm just wrapping up, Mr. Speaker, and I will say let's send again a message to these judges. She is not what the court system needs.

We need unbiased and professional in our court system and this judge does not show that. Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I urge my colleagues to oppose to this bad judge. Thank you.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative Gonzalez. Representative Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as I indicated earlier, I did rise for all of the good points that the Good Chairman made regarding the judge before us, but I think it's also important for me to rise based on the last commentary that was made.

On behalf of all of the members of the Judiciary Committee and I believe I speak on behalf of many of the members in this Chamber and certainly I speak for the members on this side of the aisle, any and all information that's provided to us by every constituent or resident of the state of Connecticut that takes the time away from their lives, their family, their jobs to come up to Hartford and speak to us, to speak on behalf of either in favor or against a judge, every ounce and shred of information and evidence and statements are taken to the fullest extent of consideration by I know every member of the Judiciary Committee and I believe every member of this Chamber.

So I think it's important to note and make clear that there is no one person that comes before us that gets over-weighted by anybody else and we take everything into serious consideration because those are the duties and responsibilities that each and every one of us takes when we take the oath of office. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Would you care to remark further? Would you care to remark further? Representative Gonzalez.

REP. GONZALEZ (3RD):

Thank you for the second time.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Yes, Ma'am.

REP. GONZALEZ (3RD):

And what I did say before, I don't -- I think -- Did I include everybody in the Judiciary Committee and if I said that, maybe I did say that I include I think that everybody, I apologize if I included everybody, but I would like to say that when I meet with this group and they call these parents that they come to testify, they called these families liars, I get offended, and this is why I'm saying we have to look, all of us, we have to be sure that all these judges are following the law. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Any comment further? Any comment further? Representative Tong of the 147th, sir.

REP. TONG (147TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I just think it's important to note, again, on behalf of the committee as its chairman, that the committee takes very seriously the testimony of the public. There's no doubt that people come before our committee, they wait for hours and hours, sometimes until the early hours of the morning, and the members wait for hours and hours and hours until the early hours of the morning to hear their testimony.

I know that the chairs and the ranking members and many other members stick it out to make sure that the public is heard. We have a process for submitting testimony. We receive lots of paper on the Judiciary Committee. That paper is provided. I think a lot of members still receive testimony in hard copy and that testimony is reviewed. A lot of people who come and testify also approach us in the hallway, in our districts, and frankly, there have been instances where people have called us at home or even come to our homes.

There are very difficult issues that we address in Judiciary Committee. They are very emotional issues, particularly in our family courts. People are in the toughest fights of their lives in that court and it often involves, this is a not a good word, but disposition, what happens to their children, and as a parent, I cannot imagine anything harder than the prospect or the fact of losing your children.

I can tell you that the people on this committee get that. The people in this legislation get that. We could not take it more seriously. So on behalf of the committee, I just want to say again that we do that work, we take it as seriously as you can take it and will continue to do so on behalf of this General Assembly. Thank you.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Representative Fishbein of the 90th, sir.

REP. FISHBEIN (90TH):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I just wanted to bring this back to the nominee. It appears we've gotten wrapped up in procedural process and certain allegations. You know, I can tell you that I've been before Judge Abery-Wetstone.

I specifically remember it was November 6, 2010, it was election day, and I was working on a state-wide campaign and I had a hearing that day and I asked Judge Wetstone to move the process along so I could get to my election day duties and she brought to my attention that there were families there and we had to deal with these issues and she was right.

And on that particular day, me being before her, she being the trier of fact in law, I think she made the right decisions on everything. I was before her in New Britain specifically, I don't remember the date, on numerous occasions, family court once again. I've never had a problem with Judge Abery-Wetstone.

I know when she got transferred from New Haven to Hartford about four years ago, if I recall correctly, I went in to visit her in Chambers and I said thank you for being a good judge, that I appreciated what she did while she was in New Haven.

So I know of no reason why this judge should not be approved here today. Thank you.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Staff and guests, please come to the well of the House. Will members please take their seats? The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted?

If all the members have voted, check the board to see if your vote has been properly cast. If all the members have voted, the board will be locked and the Clerk will take a tally.

Clerk, please announce the tally.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution 43, in concurrence with the Senate

Total number of Voting 145

Necessary for Adoption 73

Those voting Yea 119

Those voting Nay 26

Absent/not Voting 4

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Senate Joint Resolution passes in concurrence with the Senate. (Gavel)

Will the Clerk please call Senate Joint Resolution 42.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution 42, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE BRIAN T. FISCHER OF MADISON TO BE A JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report on the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Representative Paolillo, you have the floor, sir.

REP. PAOLILLO (97TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate. Representative Paolillo.

REP. PAOLILLO (97TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Judge Brian Fischer was initially appointed to the bench in 2001. Currently Judge Fischer serves as the assistant administrative judge in the New Haven District. He has served with distinction in his various assignments. He has also served as a Superior Court judge in the Meriden courts. I urge my colleagues to support this nomination and thank him for his distinguished service on the bench. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Representative Fishbein.

REP. FISHBEIN (90TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise and very happily second the nomination of Judge Brian T. Fischer. I've been before Judge Fischer quite a few times. I know I was at a meeting last week with Judge Fischer where he was goaded by his fellow judges about the amount of body parts that he has and his donating of them, so I rise today and nominate, second the nomination, of Judge Fischer.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Will you comment further on the candidate before the Chamber? Will you comment further on the candidate before the Chamber? If not, will staff and guests please come to the well of the House? Will members please -- Sorry. Representative DiMassa, I'm sorry, of the 116th. You rise to be recognized, sir, please proceed.

REP. DIMASSA (116TH):

That's okay. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. I just want to say I rise in support of Judge Fischer. It's an excellent family. I had the honor of going to Notre Dame High School with his son. I know the family well. He serves with distinction. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Comment further on the candidate before us? Will you comment further? If not, will staff and guests please come to the well of the House? Will members please take your seats? The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted? If all the members have voted, please check the board to see if your vote has been properly cast. If all the members have voted, the board will be locked. The Clerk will take a tally.

Clerk, please announce the tally.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution 42, in concurrence with the Senate

Total number of Voting 145

Necessary for Adoption 73

Those voting Yea 145

Those voting Nay 0

Absent/not Voting 4

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Senate Joint Resolution passes in concurrence with the Senate. (Gavel)

If members could please note, we have four more Senate Joint Resolutions to pass. Is it the intent to potentially place these dockets sent, so please stay within the Chamber. We are hopefully going to move through these in quick fashion. With that said, will the Clerk please call -- I'm sorry. Representative Ryan for the purpose of an announcement or introduction, sir.

REP. RYAN (139TH):

Thank you, sir. For the purpose of announcement, just in spite of your last announcement, after we get done with this session, I believe the CSG reception for new legislators in 105 will be continuing if folks want to go down there, but please remember to stay in this Chamber, as you said, until that time. Thanks.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Returning to the Call of the Calendar, will the Clerk please call Senate Joint Resolution 44.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution No. 44, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE SUSAN S. REYNOLDS OF RIDGEFIELD TO BE A SENIOR JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report or the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Mr. Clerk. Chamber recognizes Representative Linehan.

REP. LINEHAN (103RD):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Please proceed.

REP. LINEHAN (103RD):

I move acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate. Please proceed, Representative.

REP. LINEHAN (103RD):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Judge Susan Reynolds graduated from the City University of New York in 1970 and from Pace University in 1981, admitted to the Bar in 1981. She is also a member of the Danbury Bar Association. Judge Reynolds held senior status at the Waterbury Superior Court in 2013 to 2014 and currently serves as senior judge on the Danbury Supreme Court. I ask my colleagues to please support this nomination.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you very much. Will we have a comment further? A remark further? Representative Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of Judge Reynolds and motion through Mr. Speaker to move her on to the Consent Calendar.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Motion before the Chamber is to move this to consent. Is there objection to placing the item on the Consent Calendar? Is there objection to putting the item on consent? The Chamber recognizes Representative Smith of the 198th, sir. Do you need to be recognized prior to acceptance of consent?

REP. SMITH (108TH):

Mr. Speaker, I'm happy to have this go on consent. Judge Reynolds is a great Judge. Sir, I just wanted to mention, you know, as a member of the Danbury Bar Association, she has done a wonderful job, very firm, very fair. She should absolutely go on consent. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. If there is no objection to placing the item on consent and hearing no objection, the item is placed on the Consent Calendar.

Will the Clerk please call Senate Joint Resolution 45.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution No. 45, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE GEORGE N. THIM OF TRUMBULL TO BE A STATE REFEREE, Favorable Report on the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The Chamber recognizes Representative Stafstrom.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move acceptance to the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is on acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate. Representative Stafstrom, please proceed.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, Judge Thim has a long and distinguished service to our bench. He is an excellent judge and continues to perform valuable service presiding over civil trials in Bridgeport. I urge support.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Representative Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The vice-chair did an amazing job describing Judge Thim and I offer Judge Thim to the Consent Calendar.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is to place the item on the Consent Calendar. Is there objection? Is there objection to placing this item on the Consent Calendar? Hearing no objection, the item is placed on the Consent Calendar.

Will the Clerk please call Senate Joint Resolution No. 46.

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution No. 46, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE PETER EMMETT WIESE OF AVON TO BE A JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, Favorable Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Representative Stafstrom.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move to acceptance to the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate. Please proceed, sir.

REP. STAFSTROM (129TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, again, Judge Wiese has got a long and distinguished career on the bench performing invaluable services as a civil judge in the judicial district of New Britain. I urge adoption.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Representative Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I also rise in support of Judge Wiese and offer it toward the Consent Calendar.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is to place the item on the Consent Calendar. Is there objection to placing this item on consent? Is there objection? Seeing none, the item is placed on the Consent Calendar.

Will the Clerk please call Senate Joint Resolution No. 47?

CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution No. 47, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF THE HONORABLE FRANCIS J. FOLEY, III, OF HANOVER TO BE A STATE REFEREE, Favorable Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The Chamber recognizes Representative Conley.

REP. CONLEY (40TH):

Mr. Speaker, I move acceptance to the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is acceptance of the Joint Committee's Favorable Report and adoption of the Resolution in concurrence with the Senate. Representative Conley, you have the floor, Ma'am.

REP. CONLEY (40TH):

Judge Foley has been a longstanding judge. He currently sits on the Child Protection Session of Eastern Connecticut. He was appointed originally by Governor Weicker and has been serving ever since. He went to school at Boston College and graduated from Boston University School of Law.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Representative Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of Judge Foley and also offer that for the Consent Calendar.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before the Chamber is to place this item on consent. Is there objection to placing this item on consent? Seeing none, the item is placed on consent.

Will the Clerk please call Consent Calendar 1, which are comprised of Senate Joint Resolutions 44, 45, 46, and 47.

CLERK:

Consent Calendar No. 1, Senate Joint Resolution No. 44, Senate Joint Resolution No. 45, Senate Joint Resolution No. 46, Senate Joint Resolution No. 47.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The Chamber recognizes esteemed Majority Leader Representative Ritter.

REP. RITTER (1ST):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move adoption of the Consent Calendar.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The question before us is passage of today's four items, 44, 45, 46, 47 on the Consent Calendar. Will you remark? Will you remark? If not, will staff and guests please come to the well of the House? Will members please take your seats? The board will be open. (Ringing)

CLERK:

The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber. The House of Representatives is voting by roll, members to the Chamber.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Have all the members voted? Have all the members voted? We are currently voting on a Consent Calendar.

Will the members please check the board to see if your vote has been properly cast? If you vote has been properly cast and all members have voted, the machine will be locked and the Clerk will take a tally.

Clerk, please announce the tally.

CLERK:

Consent Calendar No. 1, Senate Joint Resolution 44, 45, 46, and 47

Total number of Voting 145

Necessary for Adoption 73

Those voting Yea 145

Those voting Nay 0

Absent/not Voting 4

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

The Consent Calendar passes in concurrence with the Senate. (Gavel)

Any announcements or introductions? Announcements or introductions? Representative Guerrera.

REP. GUERRERA (29TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, good afternoon. Just for a quick announcement to the members of the Chamber, it gives me great pleasure today that one of our colleagues is celebrating his birthday and that's my friend to my left, Russell Morin over here, so let's give him a warm hand. (Applause)

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Announcements or introductions? Representative Albis.

REP. ALBIS (99TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have two announcements, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Please proceed, Representative.

REP. ALBIS (99TH):

First of all, I would like to note that the House Democrats will be caucusing immediately after we adjourn in Room 207A for a brief caucus. My second announcement is for the purposes of journal notation.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Please proceed.

REP. ALBIS (99TH):

Missing votes because of legislative business in the district; Representatives Arconti, D'Agostino, de la Cruz, Lesser, and Urban. Missing votes because of legislative business outside the Chamber; Representative Reed; and missing votes due to a death in the family, Representative Luxenberg. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Representative Betts.

REP. BETTS (78TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, for the purpose of journal notations.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Please proceed, Representative.

REP. BETTS (78TH):

Yes, Representative D'Amelio, Frey, Legeyt, and MacLachlan were business in the district and for transcript, Representative Delnicki and Zawistowski were out of the Chamber for legislative business. I thank you very much.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Thank you, Representative. Representative Albis.

REP. ALBIS (99TH):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. There being no further business on the Clerk's desk, I move that we adjourn subject to the Call of the Chair.

DEPUTY SPEAKER BERGER (73RD):

Motion is to adjourn subject to Call of the Chair. Is there is objection? Is there objection? Hearing none, the House is adjourned subject to the Call of the Chair. (Gavel)

(On motion of Representative Albis of the 99th District, the House adjourned at 3: 49 o'clock p. m. , to meet again at the Call of the Chair. )

CERTIFICATE

I hereby certify that the foregoing 170 pages is a complete and accurate transcription of a digital sound recording of the House Proceedings on Wednesday, March 8, 2017.

I further certify that the digital sound recording was transcribed by the word processing department employees of Alphatranscription, under my direction.

________________________

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