PA 17-123—sHB 7020

Aging Committee

AN ACT REQUIRING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE PROGRAM REVIEW AND INVESTIGATIONS COMMITTEE CONCERNING LONG-TERM CARE

SUMMARY: This act makes various changes in the collection and reporting of long-term care data. It requires the:

1. Department of Social Services (DSS) commissioner to maintain a data collection system, within available resources and in accordance with federal law, to guide the development of the state's long-term care strategic plan ( 1);

2. Long-Term Care Planning Committee's (LTCPC) statewide long-term care plan to include the number of people receiving long-term care services and supports in the community and the number of those receiving these services in institutions ( 2);

3. LTCPC to report the above community and institution services information to the Aging and Human Services committees annually, beginning by January 1, 2018 ( 2);

4. LTCPC, within available appropriations, to evaluate certain Medicaid long-term care expenditure data to help short- and long-term Medicaid expenditure forecasting ( 2); and

5. aging commissioner to determine, among other things, the appropriate data and program outcome measures that fall prevention programs must collect and report to her ( 3).

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2017

1 DSS DATA COLLECTION SYSTEM

The act requires the DSS commissioner, within available resources and in accordance with the federal Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, to maintain a data collection system to guide the department in developing its strategic long-term care plan. In maintaining the system, the commissioner must, as applicable:

1. establish a process to identify and report on participants in the federal Money Follows the Person (MFP) program who signed an informed consent agreement to participate (presumably to participate in data reporting);

2. ensure that individuals and agencies that identify candidates for MFP have access to (a) information regarding plans to transition participants from institutional to community living and (b) options for those ineligible for the program;

3. ensure that MFP participants are counted only once for reporting purposes, regardless of how many times they have been referred to the program;

4. establish a benchmark length of time that MFP participants may hold a “transition in process” status before being placed in a home in the community; and

5. identify steps to reduce the post-transition, premature death of MFP participants with chronic diseases or health conditions, including cardiac, pulmonary, and endocrinal conditions or diabetes.

2 LTCPC AND MEDICAID LONG-TERM CARE EXPENDITURES

The act requires the LTCPC to evaluate available data on average net actual Medicaid nursing home expenditures compared to those for home- and community-based Medicaid waiver recipients who require a nursing home level of care, including the number of individuals served. The committee must do this within available appropriations and to help short- and long-term Medicaid expenditure forecasting.

3 FALL PREVENTION PROGRAM

The act requires the aging commissioner to determine the appropriate data and program outcome measures that entities receiving a grant or entering into an agreement with the department to design, implement, or evaluate a fall prevention program must collect and report to her. She must also determine how frequently the entities must report.

By law, the State Department on Aging must administer a fall prevention program within available appropriations. The program must promote and support fall prevention research; oversee research and demonstration projects; and establish, in consultation with the Department of Public Health commissioner, a professional education program on fall prevention for healthcare providers.

BACKGROUND

LTCPC Statewide Long-Term Care Plan

By law, the LTCPC must establish a statewide long-term care plan and revise it every three years. The law specifies information the plan must include, such as (1) a long-term care system vision and mission statement, (2) the types of available long-term services and the amount of funding needed to meet the demand for these services, and (3) the number and types of providers needed to deliver them.