OFFICE OF FISCAL ANALYSIS

Legislative Office Building, Room 5200

Hartford, CT 06106 (860) 240-0200

http://www.cga.ct.gov/ofa

sSB-191

AN ACT CONCERNING CHARITABLE BINGO GAMES, BAZAARS, RAFFLES, THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER PROTECTION AND OCCUPATIONAL LICENSING.


OFA Fiscal Note

State Impact:

Agency Affected

Fund-Effect

FY 18 $

FY 19 $

Consumer Protection, Dept.

GF - Revenue Gain

60,294

60,294

Consumer Protection, Dept.

GF - Revenue Loss

Less than 59,440

Less than 59,440

Note: GF=General Fund

Municipal Impact:

Municipalities

Effect

FY 18 $

FY 19 $

All Municipalities

Revenue Gain

Minimal

Minimal

Explanation

State Impact

The bill results in a General Fund revenue loss of less than $59,440 in both FY 18 and FY 19 through shifting most charitable gaming regulation to municipalities and eliminating several licenses and one certificate. In FY 16, the Department of Consumer Protection (DCP) took in $40,220 in bingo, bazaar, and raffle revenues, including some funds it then distributed to municipalities. A small portion of the revenues formerly retained by the state, along with the share previously distributed to municipalities from the state, will now go directly to host municipalities. The occupational licenses and certification eliminated under the bill generated $19,220 in General Fund revenues in FY 19.

The General Fund losses under the bill will be offset by a revenue gain of $60,294 as the state shifts to a different type of swimming pool licensure. These changes have a net impact on the General Fund of an $854 revenue gain.

Municipal Impact

There is expected to be a minimal revenue gain to municipalities, resulting from the shift in most charitable gaming regulation from DCP to municipalities. Municipalities will now receive revenue from 1) permit fees and 2) 5% of gross receipts from organizations who administer bingo games. These fees include $75 for Class A permits, $5 per day for Class B permits, and $50 for Class C permits. Parent Teacher Associations must pay $80, but will not receive a permit.

The bill is not anticipated to result in any additional cost to municipalities. As municipalities, under current law, share the responsibility for charitable gaming regulation with DCP, it is anticipated that they have the expertise to carry out the additional responsibility under the bill's provisions.

The Out Years

The annualized ongoing fiscal impact identified above would continue into the future subject to the number of permits issued for various charitable games.

Sources:

Dept. of Consumer Protection