PA 14-134—sHB 5115

Energy and Technology Committee

AN ACT CONCERNING TECHNICAL AND MINOR REVISIONS TO AND REPEAL OF OBSOLETE PROVISIONS OF ENERGY AND TECHNOLOGY STATUTES

SUMMARY: This act makes several unrelated changes in the energy and public utility statutes. It:

1. makes a minor change in the law governing virtual net metering, which allows certain electric customers to share a billing credit they receive when they generate power using renewable energy technologies;

2. explicitly exempts entities that submeter (e. g. , a campground that measures electric use at individual campsites) from the laws and regulations that apply to electric companies;

3. prohibits those who receive an upfront incentive for installing residential solar panels from also benefitting from the net metering law; and

4. makes numerous technical changes that, among other things, eliminate obsolete provisions (e. g. , those regulating telegraph companies) and correct statutory references.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage, except for technical changes regarding geographic information systems ( 79), installation of oil burners and related equipment ( 109), pipeline safety ( 111), installation of gas equipment and piping ( 112), and storage of liquefied petroleum gas (propane) ( 114), which are effective January 1, 2015.

VIRTUAL NET METERING

By law, municipal, state agency, and agricultural electric customers that install specified renewable generation systems (“hosts”) are eligible to receive a billing credit for power they generate and provide to the grid. The customers can share this credit with certain other customers (“beneficial accounts”). The total amount of the credits is capped at $10 million and each of the three categories of hosts is limited to 40% of this amount. The act specifies that the 40% limit also applies to the beneficial accounts of these three categories of hosts.

RESIDENTIAL SOLAR INCENTIVE

Connecticut's Green Bank (formerly known as the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority) offers direct financial incentives for purchasing or leasing certain residential photovoltaic (i. e. , solar power) systems. The incentive can be paid out on either a per kilowatt-hour basis or as a one-time upfront incentive based on expected system performance. The act amends a statutory reference regarding the one-time upfront financial incentive. Prior law prohibited customers who receive this incentive from receiving an additional credit but, through an incorrect statutory reference, did not specify which credit was additionally prohibited. (In practice, the Green Bank prohibited such customers from also receiving zero-emission renewable energy credits. ) The act instead specifies that these customers cannot also receive net metering credits (i. e. , electric billing credits generated when their solar systems produce more power than the customer uses).

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