OLR Bill Analysis

SB 210

AN ACT PROHIBITING THE USE OF BISPHENOL-A IN THERMAL RECEIPT PAPER AND INCREASING THE DUTIES OF THE CHEMICAL INNOVATIONS INSTITUTE.

SUMMARY:

This bill prohibits the manufacture, sale, or offer for sale of thermal receipt or cash register receipt paper containing bisphenol-A in Connecticut by October 1, 2013. The bill defines these papers as any paper that a commercial entity uses to issue a consumer transaction record by a machine. The Department of Consumer Protection commissioner may enforce these provisions.

The bill also expands the Chemical Innovations Institute's responsibilities. By January 15 annually, the institute must submit to the Environment Committee a list of chemicals of high toxic concern and any safe alternatives to them. The institute may consider the standards of any state, federal, or international organization when developing the list. The bill defines “chemical of high toxic concern” as a chemical that is scientifically established to be a carcinogen or a developmental or reproductive toxin.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013, except for the provision concerning the Chemical Innovations Institute, which is effective October 1, 2011.

BACKGROUND

Bisphenol-A (BPA)

BPA is an industrial chemical used to make certain plastics and resins, such as polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Polycarbonate plastics are often used in food and beverage containers, such as water and baby bottles. Epoxy resins can be used to coat the inside of metal products, such as food and baby formula cans, bottle tops, and water supply lines. BPA is also found in certain thermal paper products, such as cash register receipts. Animal studies have found it to have reproductive and developmental toxicity.

Chemical Innovations Institute

The Chemical Innovations Institute (established by PA 10-164) is located in the University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC). The institute must (1) foster green job growth and safer workplaces through clean technology and green chemistry and (2) assist businesses, state agencies, and nonprofit organizations seeking to use alternatives to harmful chemicals.

The institute's duties also include:

1. working with businesses, state agencies, nonprofit organizations, workers, and community groups as an information resource about chemicals of concern to public health and the environment, safe alternatives, and emerging state and federal regulations;

2. researching and identifying chemicals important to the state economy;

3. providing research and technical assistance about chemicals of environmental and public health concern and alternatives;

4. coordinating and sharing information with other states' institutes and an interstate chemicals clearinghouse concerning alternative chemicals and their impact on public health and the environment;

5. offering businesses training on chemical regulations and alternative chemicals; and

6. assisting businesses in identifying funding to implement sustainable chemical processes.

The institute and UCHC must seek administrative funding from federal entities. Both may seek funding from nongovernmental foundations, including health access foundations, private citizens, corporations, and governmental entities.

UCHC is not required to develop, implement, or promote the institute if there is, in aggregate, insufficient federal, state, and private funding to pay for the institute's initial and continuing expenses.

COMMITTEE ACTION

Environment Committee

Joint Favorable

Yea

21

Nay

6

(03/18/2011)