Appendices

Coordination of Adult Literacy Programs Final Report

Legislative Program Review and Investigations Committee

December 2006

APPENDIX A

Agency Responses

Connecticut Community Colleges

State Department of Education

Connecticut Employment and Training Commission

State Department of Labor

Appendix B. Adult Literacy Acronyms and Definitions

ABE

Adult Basic Education

AEFLA

Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (Title II, P.L. 105-220)

AHSCDP

Adult High School Credit Diploma Program

ASE

Adult Secondary Education

ATDN

Connecticut Adult Training and Development Network

CAACE

Connecticut Association for Adult and Continuing Education

CASAS

Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System

CARS

Connecticut Adult Reporting System

CCS

Connecticut Competency System

CETC

Connecticut Employment and Training Commission

CREC

Capital Region Education Council

DOL

Connecticut Department of Labor

DSS

Connecticut Department of Social Services

EDP

External Diploma Program

ESEA

Elementary and Secondary Education Act (P.L. 103-382)

ESL

English as a Second Language

GED

General Educational Development test

JFES

Jobs First Employment Services

LEP

Limited English Proficiency

LV

Literacy Volunteers

NAAL

National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003)

NGA

National Governors Association

NIFL

National Institute for Literacy

NRS

National Reporting System for Adult Education

NSAL

National Survey of Adult Literacy (1992)

OVAE

Office of Vocational and Adult Education, U.S. Department of Education

OWC

Connecticut Office of Workforce Competitiveness

RESC

Regional Education Service Center

SDE

Connecticut State Department of Education

TANF

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

TFA

Temporary Family Assistance

U.S. DOE

U.S. Department of Education

U.S. DOL

U.S. Department of Labor

WIA

Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (P.L. 105-220)

WIB

Workforce Investment Board

Appendix C. State And Federal Adult Literacy Laws: Major Provisions

Connecticut State Statutes

In Connecticut, all school districts are statutorily required to offer adult education instruction to eligible residents that includes: Americanization and United States citizenship; English for adults with limited English proficiency; and elementary and secondary school completion programs and classes. Districts may provide adult education classes on any subject and vocational education area included in their elementary and secondary school curriuculum as well as adult literacy, parenting skills, and any other subject or activity.

Credit requirements. Districts may award adult education diplomas to students who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of 20 adult education credits in certain academic and elective areas. As of July 1, 2004, the credit requirements by statute are: four credits in English; three credits in mathematics; three credits in social studies including one credit in American history and at least one-half credit in civics and American government; two credits in science; and one credit in the arts or vocational education. State law specifically allows adult education credits to be awarded for the following:

• experiential learning (e.g., military experience, occupational experience including training, community service, or avocational skills);

• successful completion of course work at state-accredited higher education institutions and approved public and private high schools and vocational-technical schools;

• satisfactory performance on subject matter tests; and

• independent study projects.

District authority. Each school district must determine the minimum number of weeks per semester for an adult education program. The district is further required to provide certified counseling staff to assist adult education program students with educational and career counseling. Local and regional boards of education providing adult education classes and activities are required to provide rooms and other facilities and employ necessary personnel. The boards have the same powers and duties in relation to adult education classes as with other public schools.

Students. Adult students may be admitted to any public elementary or secondary school to attend adult education classes. Persons enrolled in a full-time educational program in a local or regional school district must obtain the approval of the school district principal to enroll in an adult education activity.

An adult resident is statutorily defined as: (1) any person 16 years or older who in not enrolled in a public school program; (2) a student expelled from a public school for seriously disruptive conduct involving the use of alcohol and subsequently assigned to an adult class; or (3) a public school student who is under 16 and a mother and requests permission from the local or regional board of education to attend adult education classes.

Adult education providers. All local and regional boards of education are required to establish and maintain adult classes or provide through cooperative arrangements with other boards of education, cooperating eligible entities, or regional educational service centers for participation in adult classes for adult residents. A cooperating eligible entity is defined by statute as any corporation or other business entity, nonprofit organization, private occupational school, licensed or accredited institution of higher education, regional vocational-technical school, or library that enters into a written cooperative arrangements with a local or regional board of education or regional educational service center to provides adult education classes or services.

Regional educational service centers (RESCs) are education agencies formed by four or more local or regional boards of education in a state regional planning area to cooperatively provide services and programs. 1 RESCs often provide special education services, while some operate inter-district magnet schools and adult education programs for their member districts.

Fees and charges. Required adult education classes and programs in Americanization and United State citizenship, ESL, and elementary and secondary school completion programs must be provided free of charge to eligible adults. However, a providing school district can charge a registration fee to a cooperating district for that district's residents registered for required adult education classes. Further, adult students may be charged registration fees for nonrequired classes; for these classes, providing school districts may charge a higher registration fee for residents of a cooperating school district than it does for its own residents.

A board of education for any providing school district may also set and collect student fees for books and materials or require a refundable deposit for the lending of books and materials for an adult education classes, activities, or programs. Fees may be waived for a handicapped adult or elderly person (at least 62 years) enrolled in adult education classes, activities, and programs in any subject provided by the elementary or secondary school including vocational education, adult literacy, parenting skills, and any other subject or activity. A board of education providing adult education may establish and maintain an adult education school activity fund to handle the finances of the program.

State grants. To be eligible for reimbursement through a state grant, school districts and RESCs are required to annually submit an adult education proposal to the Department of Education. SDE determines the format of the proposal, including a description of the program and an estimate of the eligible costs for the upcoming fiscal year. Local and regional school districts and RESCs are reimbursed a percentage of their eligible adult education expenses based on a statutory formula.

Eligible expenditures for adult education are broadly defined in statute as those directly attributable to the required adult education program including teachers and teacher aides, administration, clerical assistance, program supplies, facility rentals other than rooms and facilities specifically for adult education classes and activities, staff development, counselors, transportation, security, and child care services.

The percentage of eligible costs for adult education is determined based on a ranking for all towns in a descending order from 1 to 169. All towns are ranked based on their adjusted equalized net grand list per capita. A reimbursement percentage on a continuous scale of 0 to 65 is determined for each town. Priority school districts have a guaranteed floor (not less than 20 percent) built into their reimbursement formula and large schools and those providing basic adult education to Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services clients are given inceases up to a certain ceiling.

Federal Law

Federal legislation concerning adult literacy was first enacted in the mid-1960s as part of the national anti-poverty programs initiated during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Recognizing the link between economic success, effective community participation, and an individual's literacy level, Congress created a grant program to support state adult basic education activities under P.L. 88-452, the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. The current federal adult literacy law, The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA), was enacted as Title II of The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), Public Law 105-220.

Purpose. The main purposes of AEFLA, according to Section 202 of P.L. 105-220, Title II, are to: “…

• assist adults to become literate and obtain the knowledge and skills necessary for employment and self-sufficiency;

• assist adults who are parents to obtain the educational skills necessary to become full partners in the educational development of their children; and

• assist adults in the completion of a secondary school education.”

Under AEFLA, “literate” means an individual is able to read, write, and speak in English, compute, and solve problems, at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job, in his or her family, and in society. The federal definition does not establish any specific educational competency level or single, national literacy standard for adults.

Funding. Federal AEFLA funds are distributed to states according to a formula based on census data on the number of adults age 16 and over who lack a high school diploma and are not enrolled in school. In FY 05, all state Adult Education and Family Literacy Act grant awards totaled nearly $560 million and Connecticut received almost $5.8 million

A 25 percent state match (state and local monies combined) is required and states must also sustain their overall level of spending (maintenance of effort) on adult literacy services. The maintenance of effort requirement applies to aggregate and per-pupil spending and states can face reduced funding allocations for noncompliance.

Most states exceed the 25 percent matching level and Connecticut's state-local contribution typically is among the highest in the country. In FY 02, Connecticut's nonfederal share of total spending on adult education and literacy was 85 percent.

States must award at least 82.5 percent of the federal grant on a competitive basis to local providers of adult education and literacy services. The federal law prohibits states from using more than 10 percent of their AEFLA funding for the education of correctional facility or other institutionalized populations.

The local provider network may include local education agencies (LEAs)/school districts, community colleges, and a variety of community- and faith-based organizations and nonprofit agencies that provide literacy services. In awarding local funding, states must consider 12 statutory criteria that include factors such as: past effectiveness, commitment to serving those most in need, measurable goals, program intensity and duration, high-quality management information, flexible schedules, support services, and coordination with other available community resources.

States are allowed to establish additional criteria and set funding priority areas for their program activities. Currently, Connecticut has identified six federal funding priority areas that include, among others, projects related to workforce preparedness, programs to improve family (parent and child) literacy, and services that promote the transition from adult education to post-secondary education and training.

The state administrative agency can retain up to 17.5 percent of the federal grant, with a maximum of 5 percent for administration and 12.5 percent for leadership activities, which are statewide program improvements such as professional development and technical assistance. In Connecticut, the State Department of Education (SDE) is the agency authorized to administer AEFLA. As the administering and supervising entity, SDE must prepare a state five-year plan for providing adult education and literacy services, monitor and report on program performance, distribute funds to local providers and provide statewide leadership.

Activities. Providers must use federal AEFLA funds to operate programs that provide services or instruction in one or more of the following categories:

• Adult education and literacy services, including workplace literacy services;

• Family literacy services; and

• English literacy services.

Under the federal law, adult education is defined as instruction below the postsecondary level for persons age 16 or older and not enrolled in secondary school who do not have a high school diploma or equivalent level of educational skills, or competency in reading, writing, or speaking English. Workplace literacy services are basic skill and ESL instructional activities offered with the purpose of improving worker productivity through improved English literacy skills. Family literacy programs integrate parent and child literacy activities including early childhood and adult education programs, parent training, and interactive literacy activities between parents and their children.

In addition to literacy programs, local providers may, and many do, offer a variety of related support services such as job placement, child care, and transportation assistance. However, such activities are usually funded from sources other than AEFLA grant money.

Performance standards and reporting. Improving accountability for the results of publicly funded employment, training, and literacy programs was a central goal of the 1998 federal workforce investment reform legislation. Under the provisions of AEFLA, there are three core indicators for assessing state performance of adult literacy activities on an annual basis:

• demonstrated improvements in literacy skill levels;

• placement or retention in, or completion of, postsecondary education, training, unsubsidized employment or career advancement; and

• receipt of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent.

The federal adult education law required the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE), to create a National Reporting System (NRS) on outcomes from state adult education and literacy activities. The reporting system developed by OVAE, which became effective in July 2000, establishes five core measures for assessing the AEFLA performance indicators as well as standardized definitions and data collection methodologies states must use to ensure comparable and reliable information. (The core NRS measures, their working definitions, and the assessement method and reporting process used in Connecticut are described in Appendix D).

Each year, states must negotiate targeted levels of performance for each NRS measure and report progress toward their goals to the U.S. DOE. States that meet or exceed their adult literacy activity goals as well as their performance goals for other WIA-funded employment and training programs can qualify for federal incentive grant funding.

Table 1. WIA Employment and Training Program Performance Measures

 

WIA Title I Programs

Measure

Adult

Dislocated Worker

Youth Age 19-21

Youth Age

14-18

Entered Employment Rate

 

Employment Retention Rate at 6 Months

 

Average Earnings Change in 6 Months

 

 

Earnings Replacement Rate in 6 Months

 

   

Entered Employment and Credential Rate*

   

Employment/Education/Training

and Credential Rate*

   

 

Customer Satisfaction for Participants

Customer Satisfaction for Employers

Skill Attainment Rate

     

Diploma or Equivalent Attainment rate

     

Placement and Retention Rate

     

*Credentials includes a high school diploma, GED, postsecondary degree or certificate, professional license/certificate

Source of Data : GAO Report 04-657 (WIA: State and Local Areas Hve Developed Strategies to Assess Performance but Labor Could Do More to Help, June 2004).

The federal core indicators for WIA Title I employment and training programs that serve adults, youth, and dislocated workers are listed in Table 1. For the most part, they focus on employment rates, credential rates, and changes in the earnings of individual participants. The indicators regarding skill attainment and high school completion, which are comparable to AEFLA core measures, were recently added for the WIA programs that serve youth age 14-18.

Required coordination. Another central goal of the 1998 WIA reforms was to integrate workforce development services through a system of community-based “one-stop” career centers. The centers were intended to give jobseekers and employers in a local labor market area access to many employment, training, and education resources at one site.

To promote collaboration and coordination, WIA requires certain federal programs, including those funded under the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, to be mandatory “one-stop” system partners (see Table 2). By law, mandatory partners are required to: make their core services available at the one-stop centers; use portion of their funding to support the one-stop system; provide representation on the local workforce investment board; and enter into formal agreements (written memoranda of understanding, MOUs) with the local boards concerning these activities.

Table 2. Mandatory WIA One-Stop System Partners

Program

Federal Agency

Adult Education and Literacy (WIA Title II)

Vocational Education (Perkins Act)

Vocational Rehabilitation

Dept. of Education

Employment and Training for Adults, Dislocated Workers, and Youth (WIA Title I)

Employment and training for migrants and seasonal farm workers

Employment and training for Native Americans

Job Corps

Older American Community Service Employment Program

Trade adjustment assistance programs

Unemployment Insurance

Veterans' employment and training programs

Employment Services (Wagner-Peyser Act)

Welfare-to-Work grant-funded programs

Dept. of Labor

Employment and training funded by Community Services Block Grants

Dept. of Health and Human Services

HUD-administered employment and training programs

Dept. of Housing and Urban Development

Source: GAO Report 02-275 (WIA: Improvemetns Needed in Performance Measures to Provide a More Accurate Picture of WIA's Effectiveness, Feb. 2002) p.8; Workforce Alliance Training Policy in Brief 2006, p. 15

APPENDIX D: National Reporting System and CASAS Overview

All states are required under the federal Adult Education and Family Literacy Act to report on five core measures of the effectiveness of their adult literacy activities. The mandated measures and their working definitions are shown in Table 1.

Table 1. Federally Mandated Measures of Adult Literacy Program Effectiveness

AEFLA Core Measures

Definitions

1. Demonstrated Literacy Skill Improvement

 

a. Education Gain Adult Basic and Secondary Education (ABE/ASE)*

Percentage of adults enrolled in basic literacy programs who acquired the basic skills needed to complete one or more levels of instruction in which they were initially enrolled

b. Educational Gain English Literacy

Percentage of adults enrolled in English literacy programs who acquired the level of English language skills needed to complete one or more levels of instruction in which they were enrolled

2. High School Completion

Percentage of adult learners with a high school completion goal who earned a high school diploma or GED after exiting the program

3. Entered Postsecondary Education or Training

Percentage of adult learners with a goal to continue their education who enter postsecondary education or training after exiting the program

4. Entered Employment

Percentage of unemployed adult learners (in the workforce) with an employment goal who were employed at the end of the first quarter after exiting the program

5. Retained Employment

Percentage of adult learners with a) a job retention goal at the time of enrollment and b) those with an employment goal who obtained work after leaving the program who were employed at the end of the third quarter after exiting the program

*ABE/ASE consists of programs covering six instructional levels ranging from beginning literacy to high school completion skills

Source of Data: U.S. Department of Education, 2006 AEFLA Annual Report to Congress on State Performance

States are required to use the National Reporting System (NRS), the AEFLA accountability process developed by the U.S. Department of Education, to report their core measures and other adult literacy activity data. NRS incorporates standard definitions and data collection methodologies to help ensure reliable, comparable performance data is gathered from all state programs

For the all but the first core measure, states can meet the NRS requirements by compiling outcome data based on program records (e.g., diplomas awarded, GED examinations passed), follow-up survey results, or cross-matches of different databases (e.g., adult education and labor/employment databases). Regarding the literacy skill improvement measure, states are required to establish standardized assessment procedures to identify the initial student proficiency as well as to measure gains from program participation. NRS defines six levels of levels of proficiency (Educational Function Levels) for adult basic and secondary programs, and another six levels for ESL programs. The ABE/ASE levels are based on reading, writing, numeracy and functional and workplace skills while the ESL levels also incorporate speaking and listening skills.

The NRS Educational Function Levels for adult basic and secondary programs and for ESL programs are shown in Table 2. According to the U.S. DOE, one NRS level is roughly equal to two grade levels. The literacy skill improvement represented by advancing on Educational Function Level, therefore, is significant.

The NRS levels are benchmarked to common adult literacy assessments, such as the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) used by Connecticut, so that how students function at each level corresponds to their performance (score range) on such standardized tests. The CASAS test scores that correspond to each NRS level are also shown in Table 2. The highest number in each CASAS range is the benchmark test score used to identify learners who complete an NRS level.

Table 2. NRS Educational Function Levels

ABE/ASE NRS Levels

CASAS Score Range

Reading/Math

ESL NRS Levels

CASAS Score Range

Reading/Math/Listening

ABE Beginning Literacy

200 and below

Beginning Literacy

180 and below

ABE Beginning Basic

201-210

Beginning

181-200

ABE Low Intermediate

211-235

Low Intermediate

201-210

ABE High Intermediate

236-245

High Intermediate

211-220

ASE Low

236-245

Low Advanced

221-235

ASE High

246 and above

High Advanced *

N/A

* Connecticut's adult education system, like those in many other states generally does not serve individuals at a high advanced level of English language proficiency as they tend to be well-educated, with high literacy levels in their native language. These students typically would be referred to postsecondary-level ESL programs, such as those offered by community colleges. The ESL high advanced level is being eliminated from the NRS reporting system by U.S. DOE effective FY 07.

Source of Data: SDE, Bureau of Early Childhood, Career and Adult Education, Connecticut Competency System Assessment Policies and Guidelines Fiscal Year 2005-2006, September 2005.

CASAS. The Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System is one of several nationally recognized tools for measuring adult literacy levels.2 CASAS is approved by both the federal and state education departments for assessing the needs of adult learners and is widely used by state and local education agencies as well as many training program operators across the country. Connecticut is one of at least 30 states that uses CASAS for reporting on the federal core measures of adult education program performance.

CASAS assessment instruments measure literacy levels in terms of defined sets of critical skill sets (competencies) adult need in different contexts. There are about 180 different instruments available for a wide variety of assessment purposes including initial skill appraisal, course and program placement guidance, and diagnosis of instructional needs as well as to monitor and document learning gains and other student outcomes.

A general description of the literacy levels in terms of reading, writing, computational, and functional/workplace skills that correspond to CASAS test scores for both ABE (which CASAS uses to refer to both adult basic and adult secondary education programs) and for ESL students is attached. The five CASAS levels shown in the attachment, which range from A to E for adult basic and secondary education as well as English as Second Language, do not directly relate to the National Reporting System levels. However, federal educational function levels for adult basic and secondary education can be matched to the subcategory descriptions within all five CASAS skill levels for ABE. Similarly, the subcategories for the CASAS skill levels A through C for ESL also match up with the six NRS levels for English language proficiency.

Appendix E. Adult Education Program Providers with Cooperating Districts (2006)

Provider District/RESC

Number/List of Cooperating District Municipalities

Branford School District

4

Clinton, Guilford, Madison, North Branford

Danbury School District

6

Bethel, Brookfield, New Fairfield, Newtown, Redding, Ridgefield

Enfield School District

4

East Windsor, Granby, Somers, Suffield

Fairfield School District

1

Easton

Farmington School District

4

Avon, Burlington, Canton, Harwinton

Hamden School District

3

Bethany, Orange, Woodbridge

Middletown School District

14

Chester, Cromwell, Deep River, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Killingworth, Middlefield, Old Saybrook, Portland, Rocky Hill, Westbrook

Naugatuck School District

4

Beacon Falls, Oxford, Wolcott*, Prospect*

New London School District

4

Lyme, Montville, Old Lyme, Waterford

Norwich School District

12

Bozrah, East Lyme, Franklin, Griswold, Ledyard, Lisbon, North Stonington, Preston, Salem, Sprague, Stonington, Voluntown

Shelton School District

4

Ansonia, Derby, Monroe, Seymour

Stamford School District

2

Darien, New Canaan

Vernon School District

16

Andover, Ashford, Bolton, Colchester, Coventry, Ellington, Glastonbury, Hebron, Manchester, Mansfield, Marlborough, South Windsor, Stafford, Tolland, Union, Willington

Waterbury School District

3

Watertown, Wolcott*, Prospect*

Westport School District

2

Weston, Wilton

Windsor Locks School District

1

East Granby

Education Connection (RESC)

27

Barkhamsted, Bethlehem, Bridgewater, Canaan, Colebrook, Cornwall, Goshen, Hartland, Kent, Litchfield, Middlebury, Morris, New Hartford, Norfolk, North Canaan, Plymouth, Roxbury, Salisbury, Sharon, Sherman, Southbury, Thomaston, Torrington, Warren, Washington, Winchester, Woodbury

EastConn (RESC)

16

Brooklyn, Canterbury, Chaplin, Columbia, Eastford, Hampton, Killingly, Lebanon, Plainfield, Pomfret, Putnam, Scotland, Thompson, Windham, Woodstock, Sterling

Total Providers with Cooperating Districts = 18

Total Cooperating District Municipalities = 125

* Wolcott and Prospect have agreements with both Naugatuck and Waterbury

Source: PRI staff analysis

APPENDIX F: Adult Education Providers

FY 05 Enrollment (# Students attending 12+ hours)

Budget (est.) FY 05

   

PROVIDER

ABE

ASE

ESL*

Total

% of Total

State & Local

Federal

Total

% of Total

School Districts/RESCs

                 

Berlin Adult Education

1

7

27

35

0.1%

$39,790

$20,000

$59,790

0.1%

Bloomfield Adult Education

20

35

7

62

0.2%

$62,212

$0

$62,212

0.2%

Branford Adult Education (ERACE)

11

161

127

299

0.9%

$177,820

$205,000

$382,820

0.9%

Bridgeport Adult Education

387

726

1,171

2,284

7.1%

$2,308,483

$170,000

$2,478,483

6.0%

Bristol Adult Education

2

273

85

360

1.1%

$460,610

$0

$460,610

1.1%

Cheshire Adult Education

-

7

26

33

0.1%

$109,234

$0

$109,234

0.3%

Danbury Adult Education (WERACE)

148

548

723

1,419

4.4%

$432,160

$170,000

$602,160

1.5%

East Hartford Adult Education

4

102

116

232

0.7%

$179,913

$0

$179,913

0.4%

East Haven Adult Education

3

200

49

252

0.8%

$765,928

$12,786

$778,714

1.9%

Enfield Adult Education

22

200

48

270

0.8%

$181,333

$0

$181,333

0.4%

Fairfield Adult Education

9

16

73

98

0.3%

$138,700

$0

$138,700

0.3%

Farmington Adult Education

3

11

67

81

0.3%

$62,706

$0

$62,706

0.2%

Greenwich Adult Education

14

16

286

316

1.0%

$164,667

$0

$164,667

0.4%

Groton Adult Education

-

94

-

94

0.3%

$61,682

$0

$61,682

0.2%

Hamden Adult Education

72

179

175

426

1.3%

$439,782

$155,000

$594,782

1.4%

Hartford Adult Education

262

1,692

683

2,637

8.3%

$6,062,762

$88,745

$6,151,507

15.0%

Meriden Adult Education

73

395

165

633

2.0%

$1,657,902

$0

$1,657,902

4.0%

Middletown Adult Education

86

443

245

774

2.4%

$2,517,600

$190,000

$2,707,600

6.6%

Milford Adult Education

5

51

29

85

0.3%

$125,560

$0

$125,560

0.3%

Naugatuck Adult Education

13

158

89

260

0.8%

$377,915

$0

$377,915

0.9%

New Britain Adult Education

107

421

586

1,114

3.5%

$1,384,652

$185,000

$1,569,652

3.8%

New Haven Adult Education

711

1,115

1,405

3,231

10.1%

$3,667,495

$120,000

$3,787,495

9.2%

Newington Adult Education

7

76

43

126

0.4%

$67,105

$0

$67,105

0.2%

New London Adult Education

97

428

379

904

2.8%

$1,752,680

$167,336

$1,920,016

4.7%

New Milford Adult Education

8

101

92

201

0.6%

$154,870

$20,000

$174,870

0.4%

North Haven Adult Education

4

13

12

29

0.1%

$64,065

$0

$64,065

0.2%

Norwalk Adult Education

37

274

555

866

2.7%

$296,731

$0

$296,731

0.7%

Norwich Adult Education

61

524

545

1,130

3.5%

$1,228,006

$215,000

$1,443,006

3.5%

Plainville Adult Education

34

59

56

149

0.5%

$511,296

$43,933

$555,229

1.4%

Shelton/Valley Reg. Adult Education

59

216

279

554

1.7%

$584,524

$55,000

$639,524

1.6%

Simsbury Adult Education

3

3

18

24

0.1%

$27,180

$0

$27,180

0.1%

Southington Adult Education

8

4

14

26

0.1%

$63,012

$0

$63,012

0.2%

Stamford Adult Education

132

302

1,917

2,351

7.4%

$1,116,527

$155,000

$1,271,527

3.1%

Stratford Adult Education

25

82

84

191

0.6%

$216,287

$0

$216,287

0.5%

Trumbull Adult Education

5

26

55

86

0.3%

$179,551

$0

$179,551

0.4%

Vernon Adult Education

35

568

293

896

2.8%

$1,164,113

$164,979

$1,329,092

3.2%

Wallingford Adult Education

31

115

137

283

0.9%

$680,045

$55,000

$735,045

1.8%

Waterbury Adult Education

218

904

884

2,006

6.3%

$2,922,315

$110,000

$3,032,315

7.4%

West Hartford Adult Education

15

59

253

327

1.0%

$372,675

$50,000

$422,675

1.0%

West Haven Adult Education

27

184

102

313

1.0%

$210,000

$0

$210,000

0.5%

Westport Adult Education

-

15

172

187

0.6%

$230,025

$0

$230,025

0.6%

Wethersfield Adult Education

8

24

52

84

0.3%

$68,344

$0

$68,344

0.2%

Windsor Adult Education

43

35

38

116

0.4%

$216,316

$81,645

$297,961

0.7%

Windsor Locks Adult Education

17

23

23

63

0.2%

$45,438

$0

$45,438

0.1%

CREC

91

83

133

307

1.0%

$600,440

$100,000

$700,440

1.7%

Education Connection

54

151

183

388

1.2%

$765,512

$180,000

$945,512

2.3%

EastConn

93

546

197

836

2.6%

$1,011,771

$255,000

$1,266,771

3.1%

CEEs

                 

Family Services Woodfield

75

-

272

347

1.1%

$146,898

$45,000

$191,898

0.5%

Literacy Volunteers - Danbury

-

-

21

21

0.1%

$55,255

$0

$55,255

0.1%

Literacy Volunteers - East Hartford

27

-

16

43

0.1%

$40,636

$0

$40,636

0.1%

Literacy Volunteers - Enfield

9

-

13

22

0.1%

$26,887

$0

$26,887

0.1%

Literacy Volunteers - Greater Hartford

102

-

130

232

0.7%

$234,310

$0

$234,310

0.6%

Literacy Volunteers - Meriden

12

-

26

38

0.1%

$38,896

$0

$38,896

0.1%

Literacy Volunteers - Middletown

4

-

10

14

0.0%

$32,687

$0

$32,687

0.1%

Literacy Volunteers - New Britain / Bristol

8

-

76

84

0.3%

$67,813

$0

$67,813

0.2%

Literacy Volunteers - New Haven

32

-

55

87

0.3%

$78,805

$0

$78,805

0.2%

Literacy Volunteers - New London

-

-

76

76

0.2%

$82,945

$0

$82,945

0.2%

Literacy Volunteers - Norwich

-

-

45

45

0.1%

$41,315

$0

$41,315

0.1%

Literacy Volunteers - Stamford/Greenwich

-

-

155

155

0.5%

$140,720

$0

$140,720

0.3%

Literacy Volunteers - Waterbury

7

-

39

46

0.1%

$38,593

$0

$38,593

0.1%

Urban League

188

58

-

246

0.8%

$190,859

$85,000

$275,859

0.7%

Waterbury OIC

5

-

-

5

0.0%

$19,835

$0

$19,835

0.0%

YMCA of Metro Hartford - Read to Succeed

18

-

-

18

0.1%

$121,462

$0

$121,462

0.3%

Other (Federal Funds Only)

                 

Department of Corrections

1,093

1,351

-

2,444

7.6%

       

APT Foundation

18

16

-

34

0.1%

$0

$50,000

$50,000

0.1%

Bullard Havens Tech. High School

22

-

60

82

0.3%

$0

$154,921

$154,921

0.4%

Connecticut Puerto Rican Forum

-

-

18

18

0.1%

$0

$50,000

$50,000

0.1%

Connecticut Renaissance

27

11

-

38

0.1%

$0

$50,000

$50,000

0.1%

Housing Authority of Ansonia

8

10

-

18

0.1%

$0

$50,000

$50,000

0.1%

Housing Authority of Meriden

-

-

27

27

0.1%

$0

$50,000

$50,000

0.1%

Mercy Learning Center

64

28

27

119

0.4%

$0

$100,330

$100,330

0.2%

NW CT Community Technical College

58

76

84

218

0.7%

$0

$140,000

$140,000

0.3%

Southend Community Services

-

-

37

37

0.1%

$0

$50,000

$50,000

0.1%

Village for Families And Children

-

-

6

6

0.0%

       

TOTAL

4,852

13,215

13,891

31,958

 

$37,285,650

$3,794,675

$41,080,325

 

*Note: ESL enrollment figures also include Citizenship Program

           

Source of Data: SDE Bureau of Early Childhood, Career and Adult Education

         

Appendix G.

Workforce Investment Act: Provisions for Employment and Training Programs

In Connecticut, the state Department of Labor is the designated administrative entity for the employment and training parts of the Workforce Investment Act (i.e., WIA Titles I and III), while the State Education Department is the designated entity for the act's adult education and literacy portion (Title II, the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act). The WIA programs overseen by the state DOL include: labor exchange services (also known as Wagner-Peyser services), which are job search, referral, placement and re-employment assistance as well as recruitment services for employers; and employment support and training programs for three categories of jobseekers. The three categories are:

• adults (persons 18 or older);

• youth (low-income persons age 14 through 21 who meet certain conditions that require assistance to complete their education or secure employment, such as deficient basic literacy skills, pregnancy, or homelessness); and

• dislocated workers (individuals who have been terminated or laid off from their jobs, or received termination or layoff notices, are eligible for or have exhausted unemployment benefits, are self-employed but unemployed because of general economic conditions, or are displaced homemakers).

WIA Title I services. Three sequential tiers of services, which must be provided through one-stop centers, are funded under WIA Title I: core; intensive; and training. Core services are primarily self-service activities and include job search and placement assistance, labor market information, as well as and information about training, unemployment and other benefits and supports (e.g., child care or transportation assistance). They are available to any jobseeker coming to a one-stop center.

Intensive services are available to individuals who complete one or more core services and are still unemployed or underemployed and may include: individual career planning and counseling, resume preparation, job clubs, internships, and comprehensive assessments. Persons who have received one or more intensive services as well as core services and are still unable to find a job may be eligible for WIA-funded employment training and education. By law, priority for WIA intensive and training services is given to public assistance recipients and other low-income individuals and to veterans.

Training. WIA-funded training services, for the most part, must be provided through Individual Training Accounts (ITAs), which operate like vouchers for vocational training and education services. Individuals can use their accounts to purchase training services from anyone on the eligible provider list prepared by the local workforce investment board for their area, as well as for tuition, books, supplies and other related training costs. Eligible training providers can include public or private training programs that meet state-established criteria, organizations that carry out certain apprenticeship programs, and post-secondary education institutions including two-year and four-year colleges and universities.

Connecticut WIA System Components

Connecticut's workforce investment system, as mandated by federal law, consists of a state administering agency, state-level and local-level workforce investment boards, an agency that staffs the state board, and a network of one-stop service delivery centers. Each major component is described briefly below.

Connecticut Department of Labor (DOL)

State agency responsible for administering federal and state employment service, unemployment insurance, and employment and training program

Regulates and enforces working conditions, wage standards, and labor relations

Broad administrative role for WIA employment and training programs and directly operates Jobs First Employment Services (JFES), Connecticut's welfare-to-work program for eligible clients of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which is administered by the state Department of Social Services

Connecticut Employment and Training Commission (CETC)/ State-level Workforce Investment Board

Established by legislature in 1989 and replaced the state Job Training Coordinating Council, taking over its statewide coordinating duties mandated under the federal Job Training Partnership Act of 1978; given additional responsibility for reviewing and reporting on the success of state employment and training programs

At present, functions as State Workforce Investment Board mandated under WIA; authorized under P.A. 99-195 to implement the federal act in Connecticut, serving as vehicle for developing state and local policies, processes and structures to achieve state workforce investment goals; within the state labor department until July 1, 2000, when transferred to the Office of Workforce Competitiveness (P.A. 00-120)

By state law, comprised of 24 members with majority representing business and industry; remainder representing state and local government (current members include commissioners of education, higher education, economic and community development, labor and social services), organized labor, education, and community-based organizations; all members appointed by the governor from recommendations submitted by legislative leadership

Required to develop and update the state's single five-year strategic plan for implementing the goals of WIA in consultation with the regional workforce investment boards (described below); additionally responsible for submitting recommendations to the governor and legislature on the appropriation of the state's federal WIA grant funding

Required to develop, and include in its annual report to the governor and legislature, an education and job training report card that assesses the accomplishments of the state workforce investment system in accordance with federal accountability requirements

Office of Workforce Competitiveness (OWC)

Initially established by Executive Order #14 (April 12, 1999), but made a statutory agency within the Office of Policy and Management for administrative purposes only under P.A. 00-192

Purpose is to provide the governor with advice on workforce investment matters and coordinate the workforce development activities of all state agencies

Must supply to the governor and legislature, with the assistance of the state labor department, necessary reports, information and assistance, drawing on any state agency for help, and serve as staff to support CETC and the JOBs Cabinet.

Connecticut's JOBs Cabinet was also created by the governor under Executive Order #14 as the implementation arm for CETC; chaired by OWC Director, other cabinet members include the commissioners of labor, economic and community development, education, and social services, the OPM Secretary and the Community Colleges Chancellor

Regional Workforce Development Boards/Local Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs)

System of regional workforce development boards, based on business-led Private Industry Councils that had been established as part of earlier federal employment and training legislation created in Connecticut in 1992

Regional boards now function as the local workforce investment boards mandated under WIA; each board also required by WIA to have a youth council

Similar to CETC, business members must constitute the majority of regional board members and whenever possible, at least half of the business and industry representatives should be small businesses including minority businesses

Nonbusiness members must include representatives of community-based organizations, state and local governments, state and local organized labor, human service agencies, economic development agencies, and regional community-technical colleges and other educational institutions including secondary and postsecondary institutions and regional vocational-technical schools

Regional board members appointed by local elected officials from the service area; boards required to broadly represent the interests of the region's population including welfare recipients, persons with disabilities, veterans, dislocated workers, younger and older workers, women, minorities, and displaced homemakers; number of members on a regional board in Connecticut ranges as high as 80

In accordance with state and federal law, the regional boards plan and coordinate workforce investment programs and services at the local level within their region in partnership with local elected officials; boards have oversight, planning, policy-making and funding authority for regional workforce investment activities.

Connecticut Works (CTWorks) Centers/One-Stop Centers

Statewide network of job centers offering comprehensive workforce development assistance to workers, students, and employers known as Connecticut Works; in place before one-stop employment and training delivery systems were federally mandated by the 1998 Workforce Investment Act (See P.A. 94-116)

20 CTWorks centers operate throughout the state under the direction of the regional workforce boards in partnership with DOL and serve as the state's WIA one-stop system.

Provide full array of employment services to jobseekers – job referral, job search, job development, and career workshops; customers who meet eligibility requirement of WIA programs for adults, youth, and dislocated workers, or are JFES program participants, can receive individualized career guidance and financial assistance for job training

For employers, one-stop centers will assist with employee recruitment and job applicant screening and provide labor market and information on tax credits and other job-related assistance for businesses; if certain federal requirements are met, employers may be eligible for customized and on-the-job training programs.

APPENDIX H. SDE 2006-2007 PRELIMINARY Adult Education Reimbursement Percentages Based on Current Law

Town

Name

Percentage

 

Town

Name

Percentage

1

ANDOVER

40.63

 

65

HARTLAND

41.40

2

ANSONIA

62.29

 

67

HEBRON

33.27

3

ASHFORD

53.01

 

68

KENT

8.13

4

AVON

6.96

 

69

KILLINGLY

61.52

5

BARKHAMSTED

32.50

 

71

LEBANON

46.04

7

BERLIN

31.34

 

72

LEDYARD

45.27

8

BETHANY

21.28

 

73

LISBON

48.36

9

BETHEL

29.02

 

74

LITCHFIELD

18.57

11

BLOOMFIELD

30.95

 

76

MADISON

10.06

12

BOLTON

37.53

 

77

MANCHESTER

46.43

13

BOZRAH

40.24

 

78

MANSFIELD

58.81

14

BRANFORD

21.67

 

79

MARLBOROUGH

24.76

15

BRIDGEPORT

63.45

 

80

MERIDEN

60.74

17

BRISTOL

58.42

 

83

MIDDLETOWN

58.18

18

BROOKFIELD

10.83

 

84

MILFORD

20.89

19

BROOKLYN

59.20

 

85

MONROE

15.86

21

CANAAN

15.48

 

86

MONTVILLE

51.07

22

CANTERBURY

53.39

 

88

NAUGATUCK

60.36

23

CANTON

23.21

 

89

NEW BRITAIN

64.61

24

CHAPLIN

56.10

 

90

NEW CANAAN

0.39

25

CHESHIRE

22.44

 

91

NEW FAIRFIELD

15.09

26

CHESTER

17.41

 

92

NEW HARTFORD

28.24

27

CLINTON

27.47

 

93

NEW HAVEN

63.07

28

COLCHESTER

43.33

 

94

NEWINGTON

37.14

29

COLEBROOK

22.05

 

95

NEW LONDON

61.90

30

COLUMBIA

31.73

 

96

NEW MILFORD

25.15

31

CORNWALL

4.64

 

97

NEWTOWN

13.93

32

COVENTRY

44.11

 

98

NORFOLK

12.38

33

CROMWELL

35.98

 

99

NORTH BRANFORD

34.05

34

DANBURY

47.59

 

100

NORTH CANAAN

50.30

35

DARIEN

0.77

 

101

NORTH HAVEN

20.12

36

DEEP RIVER

19.73

 

102

NORTH STONINGTON

28.63

37

DERBY

51.85

 

103

NORWALK

20.00

39

EASTFORD

49.91

 

104

NORWICH

65.00

40

EAST GRANBY

24.38

 

106

OLD SAYBROOK

9.67

41

EAST HADDAM

38.30

 

107

ORANGE

10.45

42

EAST HAMPTON

47.20

 

108

OXFORD

27.08

43

EAST HARTFORD

56.49

 

109

PLAINFIELD

62.68

44

EAST HAVEN

53.78

 

110

PLAINVILLE

45.65

45

EAST LYME

25.92

 

111

PLYMOUTH

54.17

46

EASTON

4.26

 

112

POMFRET

41.01

47

EAST WINDSOR

42.95

 

113

PORTLAND

39.85

48

ELLINGTON

42.56

 

114

PRESTON

51.46

49

ENFIELD

54.55

 

116

PUTNAM

57.26

50

ESSEX

7.35

 

117

REDDING

5.42

51

FAIRFIELD

6.19

 

118

RIDGEFIELD

3.87

52

FARMINGTON

12.77

 

119

ROCKY HILL

26.31

53

FRANKLIN

36.76

 

121

SALEM

33.66

54

GLASTONBURY

16.64

 

122

SALISBURY

5.80

56

GRANBY

30.18

 

123

SCOTLAND

55.71

57

GREENWICH

0.00

 

124

SEYMOUR

44.49

58

GRISWOLD

58.04

 

125

SHARON

5.03

59

GROTON

37.92

 

126

SHELTON

18.96

60

GUILFORD

14.32

 

127

SHERMAN

8.51

62

HAMDEN

46.82

 

128

SIMSBURY

18.18

63

HAMPTON

49.14

 

129

SOMERS

49.52

64

HARTFORD

65.00

 

131

SOUTHINGTON

38.69

             

Town

Name

Percentage

       

132

SOUTH WINDSOR

29.40

       

133

SPRAGUE

52.23

       

134

STAFFORD

55.33

       

135

STAMFORD

20.00

       

136

STERLING

61.13

       

137

STONINGTON

19.35

       

138

STRATFORD

34.43

       

139

SUFFIELD

35.60

       

140

THOMASTON

43.72

       

141

THOMPSON

54.94

       

142

TOLLAND

36.37

       

143

TORRINGTON

57.65

       

144

TRUMBULL

11.61

       

145

UNION

29.79

       

146

VERNON

52.62

       

147

VOLUNTOWN

48.75

       

148

WALLINGFORD

34.82

       

151

WATERBURY

64.23

       

152

WATERFORD

17.02

       

153

WATERTOWN

39.08

       

154

WESTBROOK

11.99

       

155

WEST HARTFORD

23.60

       

156

WEST HAVEN

59.97

       

157

WESTON

1.55

       

158

WESTPORT

1.16

       

159

WETHERSFIELD

32.11

       

160

WILLINGTON

44.88

       

161

WILTON

1.93

       

162

WINCHESTER

56.88

       

163

WINDHAM

63.84

       

164

WINDSOR

30.57

       

165

WINDSOR LOCKS

35.21

       

166

WOLCOTT

47.98

       

167

WOODBRIDGE

7.74

       

169

WOODSTOCK

41.79

       

201

DISTRICT NO. 1

16.25

       

204

DISTRICT NO. 4

13.93

       

205

DISTRICT NO. 5

11.99

       

206

DISTRICT NO. 6

14.32

       

207

DISTRICT NO. 7

27.08

       

208

DISTRICT NO. 8

31.73

       

209

DISTRICT NO. 9

5.03

       

210

DISTRICT NO. 10

24.38

       

211

DISTRICT NO. 11

53.78

       

212

DISTRICT NO. 12

3.10

       

213

DISTRICT NO. 13

29.79

       

214

DISTRICT NO. 14

14.70

       

215

DISTRICT NO. 15

16.64

       

216

DISTRICT NO. 16

40.63

       

217

DISTRICT NO. 17

23.60

       

218

DISTRICT NO. 18

5.80

       

219

DISTRICT NO. 19

54.17

       

241

CREC

42.95

       

242

EDUCATION CONNECTION

31.34

       

243

C.E.S

20.51

       

244

ACES

46.82

       

245

LEARN

33.27

       

253

EASTCONN

51.07

       

APPENDIX I. State and Local Adult Education Expenditures: FY 05

District

State Grant Payment

Total State & Local Spending

% Local

ANSONIA

$ 67,427

$ 125,000

46%

AVON

$ 615

$ 13,854

96%

BARKHAMSTED

$ 1,071

$ 4,239

75%

BERLIN

$ 8,691

$ 39,777

78%

BETHEL

$ 4,717

$ 22,654

79%

BLOOMFIELD

$ 19,542

$ 69,874

72%

BOLTON

$ 3,326

$ 10,825

69%

BOZRAH

$ 3,299

$ 12,081

73%

BRANFORD

$ 19,121

$ 101,830

81%

BRIDGEPORT

$ 1,077,651

$ 1,957,854

45%

BRISTOL

$ 203,166

$ 440,826

54%

BROOKFIELD

$ 1,893

$ 16,310

88%

BROOKLYN

$ 21,737

$ 41,078

47%

CANTERBURY

$ 9,090

$ 18,363

50%

CANTON

$ 1,511

$ 7,500

80%

CHAPLIN

$ 1,918

$ 3,985

52%

CHESHIRE

$ 19,898

$ 102,269

81%

CLINTON

$ 3,379

$ 11,120

70%

COLCHESTER

$ 17,478

$ 44,520

61%

COLEBROOK

$ 319

$ 1,282

75%

COLUMBIA

$ 1,375

$ 5,097

73%

COVENTRY

$ 8,950

$ 21,663

59%

CROMWELL

$ 12,548

$ 49,000

74%

DANBURY

$ 120,140

$ 366,117

67%

DARIEN

$ 51

$ 7,500

99%

DERBY

$ 63,798

$ 129,779

51%

EASTFORD

$ 1,539

$ 3,886

60%

EAST GRANBY

$ 871

$ 5,000

83%

EAST HADDAM

$ 4,666

$ 17,750

74%

EAST HAMPTON

$ 21,646

$ 50,725

57%

EAST HARTFORD

$ 101,509

$ 225,686

55%

EAST HAVEN

$ 381,189

$ 759,478

50%

EAST LYME

$ 14,324

$ 51,795

72%

EASTON

$ 84

$ 3,500

98%

EAST WINDSOR

$ 9,208

$ 25,205

63%

ELLINGTON

$ 12,110

$ 30,315

60%

ENFIELD

$ 61,363

$ 138,998

56%

FAIRFIELD

$ 7,850

$ 135,200

94%

FARMINGTON

$ 3,446

$ 36,053

90%

FRANKLIN

$ 2,135

$ 7,354

71%

GLASTONBURY

$ 4,207

$ 35,214

88%

GRANBY

$ 2,133

$ 9,611

78%

GREENWICH

$ -

$ 206,346

100%

GRISWOLD

$ 45,714

$ 87,511

48%

GROTON

$ 83,209

$ 234,339

64%

GUILFORD

$ 2,578

$ 21,019

88%

HAMDEN

$ 172,692

$ 386,163

55%

HAMPTON

$ 1,085

$ 2,463

56%

HARTFORD

$ 3,345,351

$ 6,096,222

45%

HARTLAND

$ 1,526

$ 4,340

65%

District

State Grant Payment

Total State & Local Spending

% Local

KILLINGLY

$ 62,503

$ 122,867

49%

LEBANON

$ 6,432

$ 15,832

59%

LEDYARD

$ 16,365

$ 39,292

58%

LISBON

$ 9,780

$ 21,537

55%

LITCHFIELD

$ 1,318

$ 7,154

82%

MADISON

$ 1,750

$ 19,748

91%

MANCHESTER

$ 206,236

$ 503,386

59%

MERIDEN

$ 836,269

$ 1,578,505

47%

MIDDLETOWN

$ 934,938

$ 2,078,936

55%

MILFORD

$ 30,867

$ 125,560

75%

MONROE

$ 8,958

$ 59,650

85%

MONTVILLE

$ 25,230

$ 54,338

54%

NAUGATUCK

$ 148,431

$ 282,332

47%

NEW BRITAIN

$ 643,253

$ 1,162,627

45%

NEW CANAAN

$ 11

$ 3,000

100%

NEW FAIRFIELD

$ 2,419

$ 15,404

84%

NEW HARTFORD

$ 1,678

$ 7,123

76%

NEW HAVEN

$ 1,932,595

$ 3,511,933

45%

NEWINGTON

$ 24,284

$ 67,105

64%

NEW LONDON

$ 819,347

$ 1,526,746

46%

NEW MILFORD

$ 35,620

$ 153,430

77%

NEWTOWN

$ 2,475

$ 22,654

89%

NORFOLK

$ 208

$ 1,967

89%

NORTH BRANFORD

$ 5,774

$ 18,185

68%

NORTH HAVEN

$ 12,647

$ 74,065

83%

NORTH STONINGTON

$ 7,427

$ 21,537

66%

NORWALK

$ 52,367

$ 296,731

82%

NORWICH

$ 360,312

$ 648,088

44%

OLD SAYBROOK

$ 6,272

$ 63,350

90%

OXFORD

$ 717

$ 2,500

71%

PLAINFIELD

$ 74,009

$ 135,497

45%

PLAINVILLE

$ 223,418

$ 511,296

56%

PLYMOUTH

$ 2,644

$ 5,570

53%

POMFRET

$ 3,796

$ 10,017

62%

PORTLAND

$ 12,355

$ 38,500

68%

PRESTON

$ 16,043

$ 37,294

57%

PUTNAM

$ 41,257

$ 80,556

49%

REDDING

$ 111

$ 3,625

97%

RIDGEFIELD

$ 273

$ 9,967

97%

ROCKY HILL

$ 9,149

$ 40,000

77%

SALEM

$ 3,365

$ 9,664

65%

SCOTLAND

$ 1,112

$ 2,430

54%

SEYMOUR

$ 40,736

$ 97,005

58%

SHELTON

$ 24,578

$ 139,374

82%

SHERMAN

$ 254

$ 2,983

91%

SIMSBURY

$ 6,100

$ 43,587

86%

SOMERS

$ 7,600

$ 17,952

58%

SOUTHINGTON

$ 17,012

$ 51,909

67%

SOUTH WINDSOR

$ 8,535

$ 35,214

76%

SPRAGUE

$ 11,206

$ 22,482

50%

STAFFORD

$ 20,313

$ 40,203

49%

District

State Grant Payment

Total State & Local Spending

% Local

STAMFORD

$ 217,398

$ 1,254,022

83%

STERLING

$ 8,134

$ 15,778

48%

STONINGTON

$ 16,297

$ 101,589

84%

STRATFORD

$ 71,627

$ 216,287

67%

SUFFIELD

$ 5,296

$ 17,045

69%

THOMASTON

$ 10,063

$ 26,796

62%

THOMPSON

$ 35,215

$ 67,860

48%

TOLLAND

$ 7,989

$ 24,631

68%

TORRINGTON

$ 55,642

$ 114,776

52%

TRUMBULL

$ 23,908

$ 179,551

87%

UNION

$ 1,236

$ 4,642

73%

VERNON

$ 135,163

$ 288,956

53%

VOLUNTOWN

$ 5,823

$ 12,922

55%

WALLINGFORD

$ 222,516

$ 658,410

66%

WATERBURY

$ 1,575,674

$ 2,870,066

45%

WATERFORD

$ 5,040

$ 77,717

94%

WATERTOWN

$ 4,117

$ 11,485

64%

WESTBROOK

$ 982

$ 7,775

87%

WEST HARTFORD

$ 68,307

$ 322,675

79%

WEST HAVEN

$ 119,428

$ 220,000

46%

WESTON

$ 349

$ 25,526

99%

WESTPORT

$ 1,654

$ 161,666

99%

WETHERSFIELD

$ 20,534

$ 68,344

70%

WILTON

$ 435

$ 25,526

98%

WINCHESTER

$ 8,691

$ 18,182

52%

WINDHAM

$ 196,529

$ 348,873

44%

WINDSOR

$ 61,291

$ 216,316

72%

WINDSOR LOCKS

$ 9,940

$ 38,317

74%

WOLCOTT

$ 4,114

$ 10,213

60%

WOODSTOCK

$ 7,198

$ 18,492

61%

DISTRICT NO. 1

$ 8,622

$ 60,127

86%

DISTRICT NO. 4

$ 7,583

$ 56,950

87%

DISTRICT NO. 5

$ 2,254

$ 20,000

89%

DISTRICT NO. 6

$ 376

$ 3,243

88%

DISTRICT NO. 7

$ 3,571

$ 15,844

77%

DISTRICT NO. 8

$ 6,145

$ 22,222

72%

DISTRICT NO. 10

$ 995

$ 4,700

79%

DISTRICT NO. 12

$ 90

$ 2,400

96%

DISTRICT NO. 13

$ 11,471

$ 40,000

71%

DISTRICT NO. 14

$ 3,981

$ 24,820

84%

DISTRICT NO. 15

$ 456

$ 3,342

86%

DISTRICT NO. 16

$ 3,710

$ 9,970

63%

DISTRICT NO. 17

$ 9,996

$ 48,000

79%

DISTRICT NO. 18

$ 2,017

$ 29,536

93%

DISTRICT NO. 19

$ 44,296

$ 86,490

49%

CREC

$ 216,784

$ 582,582

63%

ED. CONNECTION

$ 119,124

$ 465,195

74%

EASTCONN

$ 28,944

$ 66,965

57%

TOTAL

$ 16,064,500

$ 35,006,101

54%

Source of Data: SDE, June 23, 2006

   

APPENDIX J

Survey of Connecticut Adult Education Program Providers (October 2006)

Your Program Name: [SENT TO 47 PROVIDERS; 33 SURVEYS RETURNED (70% response rate)]

1. Do you maintain a formal waiting list for your mandated adult education classes? 22 yes 11 no (n=33)

2. At present, how many individuals are waiting for an opening to participate in your mandated adult education programs and how many are participating? Please provide the information below, if available:

Information as of ___________ 2006 (date)

ABE

GED

CDP

EDP

ESL

Total Number Participating in Classes

(range of responses)

2-278

n=27

3-285

n=28

44-1,210

n=21

0-44

n=14

6-1,496

n=26

Total Number Waiting for Classes

(range of responses)

0-92

n=16

0-44

n=17

0-46

n=15

0-5

n=9

0-315

n=19

3. For your Fall 2006 program schedule, have you added classes or increased class sizes to accommodate student demand for your mandated adult education programs? Please check all that apply.

Added Class(es):

18 (n=30)

12 ABE

3 GED

10 CDP

13 ESL

Increased Class Size:

16 (n=31)

13 ABE

9 GED

8 CDP

11 ESL

4. What are the current sizes of your mandated adult education program classes? In general, what would you like your average class size to be for each type of program?

 

ABE

GED

CDP

ESL

Smallest Class Size (Number)

       

Largest Class Size (Number)

       

Actual Average Class Size (Number)

(range of responses)

1.5-25

(n=31)

1.5-34.5

(n=34.5)

7-26

(n=22)

6-30

(n=32)

Goal Average Class Size (Number)

       

5. What is your policy regarding participation in your mandated adult education programs by individuals who are not residents of your school district(s)? Check one:

14 (n=33) Allow any nonresident to participate without charge if space is available

3 (n=33) Allow any nonresident to participate if space is available and charge nonresident's town

7 (n=33) Do not allow nonresidents to participate

9 (n=33) Other (please explain) e.g., allow if work in town; allow if live in other town but near site, etc.

6. In general, when are your mandated adult education classes available?

 

Offered Daytime?

29 yes (n=32)

Offered Evening?

32 yes (n=32)

Offered Weekend?

6 yes (n=32)

Offered Summer?

23 yes (n=32)

ABE Classes

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

GED Classes

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

CDP Classes

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

ESL Classes

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

___ Yes ___ No

7. At present, how many staff do you employ for your mandated adult education programs?

 

Total Number

Number Full-Time (18 no FT positions)

Number Teachers (range)

2-82 (n=33)

0-27 (n=33); 22 no FT teachers

Number Counselors (range)

0-15 (n=33)

0-3 (n=33); 23 no FT counselors

8. Do you offer any adult education classes or programs targeted for adults with special needs (e.g., free adult special education classes, basic education instruction for deaf or hearing impaired adults, community living courses for adults with developmental disabilities, etc.)? 19 no 12 yes (n=31)

If yes, please describe: _____________________________________________________________

APPENDIX K

Workforce Challenges Facing Connecticut

Highlights from “Connecticut Demographics and Economics”

by the Office of Workforce Competitiveness (OWC)3

“The global transition to knowledge economy raises levels of skills needed in workplace … a strong foundation in math, science, literacy skills and technology is critical.” (p. 5)

“Connecticut's economy must be fueled by innovation and skilled talent to remain competitive and will depend heavily on …”

research and development, venture capital, technology transfer and commercialization

skills upgrading for existing workers, especially older workers staying on the job longer

increased numbers of graduates in math, science, technology and engineering fields (p. 66).

According to OWC, the combination of Connecticut's economic and demographic profiles, in light of the worldwide movement from an industrial economy to an information-based economy, present a significant challenges to generating and retaining the skilled workforce the state needs to be competitive. Among the most significant concerns are: no population growth; barely any workforce growth, with most increases due to immigration; an aging population; a net loss of young, entry-level workers (college-age up to age 34); and the fact much of tomorrow's available workforce will come from areas of high poverty. Poverty remains a critical factor affecting academic achievement. Low graduation rates among minority students and significantly lower student performance on state tests in urban districts mean many individuals in state's “talent pipeline” will be unprepared for and lack the minimum skills levels needed in a knowledge-based economy.

A Demographic Snapshot

Connecticut ranks:

- 45th in total population growth

- 10th in the percentage of residents age 65 and older

- 18th in projected population growth to 2025, with a 0.0% expected growth rate over the period

- 7th oldest state in the nation, with a median age 38.5 in 2003 and projected to reach 40 by 2008

- 14th in the percentage of the population made up of immigrants and 12th in projected increase through 2025

- 4th in exportation of college-bound students, and a “net exporter” of college students

- 23rd in projected high school graduates over the period 2002-2018

By 2010, those over age 45 will represent 40 percent of Connecticut's workforce.

There are more individuals over 62 than there are teenagers in Connecticut and twice as many households without school-aged children as those with.

The 20-34 age cohort in Connecticut declined at roughly twice the national average between 1990 and 2000 (over 20% compared to 12%).

Student in poor communities, compared to the statewide average, are:

- 17 times more likely to drop out of high school; and

- 9 times less likely to pass the 10th grade Connecticut Academic Performance Test CAPT).

1 There are six RESCs statewide: (1) Area Cooperative Educational Services (ACES) in the New Haven area; (2) Cooperative Education Services (CES) in the Bridgeport area; (3) Capital Region Education Council (CREC) in the Hartford area; (4) EastConn in the Windham area; (5) Education Connecticut in the Litchfield area; and (6) LEARN in the Middletown and Eastern shoreline area.

2 Some of the other commonly used standardized adult literacy assessment tools are TABE (Test of Adult Basic Education) and ABLE (Adult Basic Learning Examination), both of which are scored using grade-level equivalents.

3 See “Demographics and Economics in Connecticut,” a PowerPoint presentation prepared by OWC, March 2006.