Connecticut Seal

House of Representatives

File No. 703

General Assembly

 

February Session, 2004

(Reprint of File No. 528)

Substitute House Bill No. 5211

 

As Amended by House

Amendment Schedules

"A", "B", "C" and "D"

This act shall take effect as follows:

Section 1

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Agency Affected

Fund-Effect

FY 05 $

FY 06 $

Criminal Justice Agencies

GF - Net Impact

Significant Savings

Significant Savings

Yea

30

Nay

8

Yea

47

Nay

2

TOP

1 The new board would be within DOC for administrative purposes only.

2 The current Board of Pardons meets twice per year and has a budget of $37, 434.

3 There are currently 40 inmates in DOC custody with a primary offense of aggravated sexual assault.

4 Under the proposal, inmates eligible for parole after serving 50% of their sentence would be granted a conditional parole release after serving 75% and inmates and inmates eligible for parole after serving 85% of their sentence would be granted a conditional parole release after serving 85%.

5 This is based on average parole officer caseload of 60 parolees.

6 Currently, DOC and Parole consider over 3, 000 offenders per month for community supervision.

7 From February 2003 to February 2004, the average grant rates for full panel hearings and administrative hearings are about 88% and 79% respectively.

8 The current average daily cost of incarceration is $75 and current law provides that a person receive $50 per day for time spent in prison.

9 The average daily inmate cost is $72/day but when fringe benefit and debt service costs are included, the cost rises to $96/day.

10 The court must find that the accused person was an alcohol-dependent or drug-dependent person at the time of the crime, and the person needs and is likely to benefit from treatment. Prosecution cannot be suspended for a defendant who is charged with a class A, B or C felony, operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or who was twice previously ordered to be treated under CGS Section 17a-696.

11 According to the Attorney General, the state has collected about $2 million in the last 5 years related to recovering prison costs.

12 About half of the 1, 300 inmates currently serving mandatory minimum sentences in the Department of Correction are for nonviolent offenses.