Wednesday, February 8, 1989

February 8, 1989]                            JOURNAL OF THE SENATE
JOURNAL OF THE SENATE                                  [Wednesday,

    The Senate was called to order at 11:32 a.m., the President in
the Chair.

    The Prayer was offered by the Chaplain, Rev.  Joseph A. Devine
of Waterbury, Connecticut.

    The following is the prayer.

    Let us pray: O God, who has  given  us  this beautiful State of
Connecticut  as our heritage, we pray today for strength,  courage
and guidance.  We ask your blessings not only on ourselves in the
Circle  but  on all the people of our state whom we so  faithfully
serve. We ask this through our Heavenly Father. Amen.

                       ____________________

                              PLEDGE

    Senator Larson of the  3rd  led  the  Senate  in the Pledge of
Allegiance.

                       ____________________

                             PETITION

    The  following  petition  was  received by the  Clerk  of  the
Senate,  Wednesday  February   8,   1989  in  accordance  with the
provisions of Joint Rule 11.

                         PETITION NO. 10

    In  accordance  with  the  provisions of Joint  Rule  11,  the
Committee on Planning and Development is respectfully requested to
draft  a Bill based on Proposed Senate Bill No.  595, entitled "AN
ACT CONCERNING MUNICIPAL HISTORIANS".

                      SEN. UPSON, 15th DIST.
                     SEN. HAMPTON, 33rd DIST.
                     SEN. GUNTHER, 21st DIST.
                      SEN. SCOTT, 14th DIST.
                    SEN. FREEDMAN, 26th DIST.
                    SEN. BENVENUTO, 36th DIST.
                      SEN. EADS, 30th DIST.
                    SEN. ROBERTSON, 34th DIST.
                    SEN. LOVEGROVE, 28th DIST.
                   SEN. McLAUGHLIN, 32nd DIST.
                      SEN. SOMMA, 16th DIST.
                    SEN. SCARPETTI, 22nd DIST.

                       ____________________

               COMMUNICATION FROM HIS EXCELLENCY,
                           THE GOVERNOR

    The   following   communications   were  received   from   His
Excellency, the Governor, read  by  the  Clerk and referred to the
Senate Committee on Executive and Legislative Nominations:

                         February 3,1989

TO THE HONORABLE SENATE:
    Pursuant  to  Sections  17-257b   of  the  Connecticut General
Statutes,  I have the honor to nominate, and with your advice  and
consent reappoint, EZRA E. H. GRIFFITH, M.D. of North Haven, to be
a   member  of  the  Psychiatric  Security  Review  Board,  as   a
psychiatrist  experienced  with  the  criminal  justice system, to
serve from June 30, 1989, for the term ending June 30, 1995.

                        WILLIAM A. O'NEILL
                             Governor

                         February 3,1989

TO THE HONORABLE SENATE:
    Pursuant  to  Sections  17-257b  of  the  Connecticut  General
Statutes, I have the honor to  nominate,  and with your advice and
consent  reappoint, ROBERT B.  BERGER, ESQUIRE of Enfield, to be a
member of the Psychiatric Security Review Board, as a attorney who
is a member of the bar of this state, to serve from June 30, 1989,
for the term ending June 30, 1995.

    Pursuant to Section 4-9a of the  Connecticut General Statutes,
I  am  also appointing him Chairman of  the  Psychiatric  Security
Review Board, to serve at the pleasure of the Governor.

                        WILLIAM A. O'NEILL
                             Governor

NOTE: Term Correction


                       ____________________

                      INTRODUCTION OF BILLS
              SENATE AND HOUSE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

    On  motion of Senator O'Leary of the 7th, the first reading of
the following bills and resolutions  was waived, the list of bills
and  resolutions as prepared by the Clerks was accepted,  and  the
bills and  resolutions  referred  to  the  committees as indicated
thereon in concurrence:

                            JUDICIARY

    S.B.   No.   2  (COMM)  JUDICIARY.  'AN  ACT  REINSTATING  AND
VALIDATING  THE  CORPORATE  EXISTENCE   OF   FALVEY   TRUCKING   &
EXCAVATING,   INC.,  LANDMARK  CONNECTICUT  HOTEL  CORP.  AND  TEN
HARTFORD AVENUE, INC', to reinstate  and  validate  the  corporate
existence   of   Falvey  Trucking  &  Excavating,  Inc.,  Landmark
Connecticut Hotel Corp. and Ten Hartford Avenue, Inc.

                          PUBLIC SAFETY

    S.B.  No.  157  (COMM)  PUBLIC  SAFETY.  'AN  ACT   CONCERNING
AUTHORIZATION OF BONDS OF THE STATE FOR THE ERECTION OF A VETERANS
WAR MEMORIAL IN HAMDEN', to provide funds for the  erection  of  a
veterans war memorial in Hamden.

    S.B.   No.  179  (COMM)  PUBLIC  SAFETY.  'AN  ACT  CONCERNING
AUTHORIZATION OF BONDS OF THE STATE FOR THE YOUNG MEN'S  CHRISTIAN
ASSOCIATION   OF   METROPOLITAN  HARTFORD,  INC',  to  ensure  the
continued  availability  of  safe,  affordable   housing   meeting
regional  needs at the downtown branch of the Hartford Young Men's
Christian Association.

                            JUDICIARY

    S.B. No. 329 (COMM) JUDICIARY. 'AN ACT CONCERNING THE  PENALTY
FOR INTERFERENCE WITH A CEMETERY OR BURIAL GROUND', to establish a
minimum fine of five hundred dollars for the crime of  interfering
with a cemetery or burial ground.

                          TRANSPORTATION

    S.B.   No.   413  (COMM)  TRANSPORTATION.  'AN  ACT  REQUIRING
MOTORCYCLISTS  TO  WEAR  PROTECTIVE  HEADGEAR',  to   reduce   the
incidence  of  death  and  traumatic brain injury among motorcycle
operators and passengers by requiring the use of helmets.

    S.B. No. 416 (COMM) TRANSPORTATION.  'AN  ACT  CONCERNING  THE
SPEEDING  LIMIT  ON  INTERSTATE  HIGHWAYS',  to increase the speed
limit on interstate highways outside of urbanized areas  to  sixty
miles per hour.

    S.B.  No.  540  (COMM)  TRANSPORTATION.  'AN ACT REQUIRING THE
DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES TO ISSUE SPECIAL  NUMBER  PLATES  FOR
COLLEGES  AND  UNIVERSITIES  IN  THE  STATE',  to  promote  higher
education in Connecticut by creating special number license plates
for state colleges and universities.

    S.B.  No.  771  (RAISED)  TRANSPORTATION.  'AN  ACT IMPOSING A
PENALTY FOR THE IMPROPER USE OF EMISSIONS COMPLIANCE STICKERS', to
provide  a  penalty  for  the improper use of emissions compliance
stickers.

    S.B. No.  772  (RAISED)  TRANSPORTATION.  'AN  ACT  PERMITTING
EMANCIPATED  MINORS  TO  REGISTER  MOTOR  VEHICLES',  to permit an
emancipated minor to register a motor vehicle owned by him.

    S.B. No. 773 (RAISED) TRANSPORTATION. 'AN ACT  INCREASING  THE
AMOUNT  OF  THE  SURETY  BOND  FOR  APPLICANTS  FOR  A DEALER'S OR
REPAIRER'S LICENSE', to require  an  applicant  for  a  repairer's
license  to  furnish  a  surety bond in the amount of ten thousand
dollars, and an applicant for a dealer's license to furnish a bond
in  the  amount  of twenty-five thousand dollars. Current statutes
require a repairer to furnish a bond for two thousand five hundred
dollars and a dealer to furnish a bond for five thousand dollars.

    S.B.  No.  774 (RAISED) TRANSPORTATION. 'AN ACT CONCERNING THE
USE OF MUNICIPAL LICENSE PLATES',  to  permit  the  motor  vehicle
commissioner  to  adopt  regulations concerning the use of general
distinguishing number plates issued to municipalities.

    S.B. No.  775  (RAISED)  TRANSPORTATION.  'AN  ACT  CONCERNING
STOLEN,  LOST OR DESTROYED VESSELS', to permit persons who present
evidence to the motor vehicle commissioner that their  vessel  has
been  stolen, lost or destroyed to have another vessel numbered in
their names for the remainder of the numbering period or  to  have
another registration decal issued in their names for the remainder
of the registration period.

                    INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE

    S.B. No. 776 (RAISED)  INSURANCE  AND  REAL  ESTATE.  'AN  ACT
CONCERNING  A BROKERED TRANSACTIONS GUARANTY FUND', to establish a
guaranty fund for brokered transactions within the  department  of
insurance.

    S.B.  No.  777  (RAISED)  INSURANCE  AND  REAL ESTATE. 'AN ACT
CONCERNING CHECKS FROM INSURANCE  AGENTS  AND  BROKERS  WHICH  ARE
RETURNED  FOR INSUFFICIENT FUNDS', to require that insurers report
checks issued  by  agents  and  brokers  which  are  returned  for
insufficient funds, and to require that if an agent or broker does
not provide such  funds  within  five  days  of  notice  from  the
commissioner his license shall be suspended.

    S.B.  No.  778  (RAISED)  INSURANCE  AND  REAL ESTATE. 'AN ACT
CONCERNING THE HEALTH  REINSURANCE  ASSOCIATION',  to  permit  the
Health  Reinsurance  Association to develop alternative provisions
and cost containment features for comprehensive health care plans,
and to clarify the residency requirement for participation in such
plans.

                            JUDICIARY

    H.B.  No.  5099  (COMM)  'AN  ACT  REQUIRING  APPLICANTS FOR A
DRIVER'S LICENSE TO COMPLETE A COURSE CONCERNING ALCOHOL AND DRUGS
AND THE DANGERS OF DRIVING AFTER DRINKING ALCOHOL OR USING DRUGS',
to require that as a condition of receiving a driver's license  an
applicant  complete  a  course dealing with alcohol, drugs and the
dangers of driving a motor vehicle after drinking alcohol or using
drugs.

                          PUBLIC SAFETY

    H.B.  No.  5160 (COMM) 'AN ACT REQUIRING PHOTOGRAPHS ON PISTOL
AND REVOLVER PERMITS', to require that  all  pistol  and  revolver
permits  include  photographs  of the permittee for identification
purposes.

                          TRANSPORTATION

    H.B. No. 5164  (COMM)  'AN  ACT  CONCERNING  AUTHORIZATION  OF
BONDS  OF  THE  STATE  FOR  THE  MUNICIPAL ABANDONED VEHICLE TRUST
FUND', to provide funds for the municipal abandoned vehicle  trust
fund.

                            JUDICIARY

    H.B.  No.  5221  (COMM) 'AN ACT REINSTATING AND VALIDATING THE
CORPORATE EXISTENCE OF CERTAIN  CORPORATIONS',  to  reinstate  and
validate  the corporate existence of Hansen Brothers, Inc., Valley
Ob-Gyn  Associates,  P.C.,  Programmed  Marketing,  Inc.  and  New
England Institute of Alcohol Studies, Inc.

    H.B.   No.   5860   (COMM)   'AN   ACT  CONCERNING  CONSENSUAL
INTERCOURSE BETWEEN MINORS', to  decriminalize  consensual  sexual
intercourse  between minors when there is less than a two-year age
differential.

    H.B. No. 5867 (COMM) 'AN  ACT  CONCERNING  PETITIONS  FOR  THE
COMMITMENT  OF  NEGLECTED,  UNCARED-FOR OR DEPENDENT CHILDREN', to
require the commissioner of children and youth services to  review
and approve certain petitions seeking the commitment of neglected,
uncared-for or dependent children.

    H.B. No. 5870 (COMM) 'AN  ACT  CONCERNING  THE  VALIDATION  OF
LATE-FILED MUNICIPAL TAX LIENS', to validate real estate tax liens
which were not filed by towns within the time prescribed by law.

    H.B.  No.  5927  (COMM)  'AN  ACT  PROHIBITING  THE   USE   OF
PHOTOGRAPHIC  RADAR  DEVICES  TO SUPPORT SPEEDING CONVICTIONS', to
provide that a photographic radar device shall not be  accorded  a
prima  facie  presumption  of  accuracy  sufficient  to  support a
speeding conviction.

                          TRANSPORTATION

    H.B. No. 5959  (COMM)  'AN  ACT  CONCERNING  THE  ISSUANCE  OF
IDENTITY CARDS TO PERSONS FIFTEEN YEARS OF AGE', to permit persons
fifteen years of age to obtain identity cards.

    H.B.  No.  5975   (COMM)   'AN   ACT   REQUIRING   A   VEHICLE
IDENTIFICATION  NUMBER ON ALL WINDOWS IN MOTOR VEHICLES', to deter
motor vehicle theft in the state.

                     PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

    H.B. No. 6317 (COMM) 'AN ACT CONCERNING FIRE, SEWER AND  OTHER
SPECIAL  TAXING  DISTRICTS',  to implement certain recommendations
made by the Connecticut advisory commission  on  intergovernmental
relations  with  respect  to special taxing districts and to allow
residents who are not citizens but who own property and pay  taxes
to  be  eligible  to  vote  and  hold office in any fire, sewer or
school district.

                           ENVIRONMENT

    H.B. No. 6475 (COMM) 'AN ACT CLARIFYING THE CONNECTICUT  WATER
DIVERSION   POLICY   ACT',   to   require   the   commissioner  of
environmental protection consider the  age  of  the  water  supply
system and capital investment made by a municipality in granting a
diversion permit and to insure the  grandfathering  of  diversions
registered on or before July 1, 1983.

                            JUDICIARY

    H.B.  No.  6793  (COMM) 'AN ACT CONCERNING THE DISTRIBUTION OF
INTESTATE ESTATES', to clarify that a person who abandons  his  or
her  spouse  is  not  entitled to share in such spouse's intestate
estate.

    H.B. No. 6885 (COMM) 'AN ACT CONCERNING SPEEDING',  to  permit
persons arrested for speeding up to sixty-five miles per hour on a
nonlimited access highway to pay their fines by mail.

                          TRANSPORTATION

    H.B. No. 7195 (RAISED) 'AN ACT RESTRICTING  PUBLIC  ACCESS  TO
CERTAIN  HOME  ADDRESS  INFORMATION  RETAINED BY THE MOTOR VEHICLE
DEPARTMENT', to permit the motor vehicle commissioner to  withhold
from  public  inspection  the  home  address  of any member of the
federal or state judiciary.

    H.B. No. 7196 (RAISED) 'AN  ACT  DEFINING  RESIDENCE  IN  THIS
STATE  FOR  PURPOSES OF MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION', to define the
term "residence" for purposes of motor vehicle registration.

    H.B.  No.  7197  (RAISED)  'AN  ACT  INCREASING  THE  FEE  FOR
RESTORATION  OF  A  MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATOR'S LICENSE', to increase
the fee for restoration of a motor vehicle operator's license from
ten to fifty dollars.

                    INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE

    H.B.  No. 7198 (RAISED) 'AN ACT CONCERNING CERTIFIED INSURANCE
CONSULTANTS',  to  change  the  name   of   "certified   insurance
consultants" to "licensed insurance consultants."

                            JUDICIARY

    H.B.  No.  7199  (RAISED)  'AN ACT CONCERNING INVESTIGATION OF
CHILD ABUSE', to permit a police officer to petition the court for
an  order directing that a child be x-rayed if there is reasonable
cause to believe that physical injuries have been  inflicted  upon
such  child  by  a  person  responsible  for  such child's health,
welfare or care.

    H.B.  No.  7200  (RAISED)  'AN  ACT  CONCERNING  TESTIMONY  OF
CHILDREN  IN SEXUAL ABUSE OR CHILD ABUSE CASES', to insure that in
a criminal prosecution involving the alleged  sexual  abuse  of  a
minor  child the constitutional right of a defendant to physically
confront the witnesses against him  is  not  unduly  infringed  by
requiring  the  state to demonstrate a compelling need to take the
testimony of the minor victim outside the physical presence of the
defendant,  to  authorize the court in such a prosecution to adopt
special procedures for the presentation of the  testimony  of  the
child victim, and to authorize the administration of a simple oath
to a child witness.

                PROGRAM REVIEW AND INVESTIGATIONS

    H.B.   No.   7201   (RAISED)   'AN   ACT   IMPLEMENTING    THE
RECOMMENDATIONS    OF   THE   LEGISLATIVE   PROGRAM   REVIEW   AND
INVESTIGATIONS COMMITTEE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INVESTIGATION RELATED TO
THE    DIVISION   OF   CRIMINAL   JUSTICE',   to   implement   the
recommendations   of   the   legislative   program   review    and
investigations  committee  concerning  the  division  of  criminal
justice.

                       ____________________

                        SENATE RESOLUTION
                        RESOLUTION ADOPTED

    The following resolution was introduced, read and adopted.

    S.R.  No.  12  SEN.  O'LEARY,  7th  DIST. RESOLUTION RAISING A
COMMITTEE TO INFORM THE HOUSE THAT THE SENATE IS READY TO MEET  IN
JOINT CONVENTION.

    On  motion  of  Senator  O'Leary of  the  7th  resolution  was
adopted.

    The following is the resolution.

Resolved by the Senate:
    That a committee of three senators be appointed to inform the
House  that  the  Senate  is ready to meet  the  House  in  Joint
Convention.

    The President appointed Senators Daniels of the 10th, Morton
of the 23rd and Eads of the 30th.

                       ____________________

                              RECESS

    On  motion of Senator O'Leary of the 7th, the Senate at  11:38
a.m. recessed.

                       ____________________

                           AFTER RECESS

    The Senate reconvened at 1:57 P.M. President in the Chair.

                       ____________________

                            PETITIONS

    The following  petitions  were  received  by  the Clerk of the
Senate,   Wednesday  February  8,  1989  in  accordance  with  the
provisions of Joint Rule 11.

                         PETITION NO. 11

    In  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Joint  Rule 11, the
Committee  on Education is respectfully requested to draft a  Bill
based  on  Proposed  Senate   Bill   No.   63,  entitled  "AN  ACT
ESTABLISHING A DEDICATED FUND FOR EDUCATION".

                      SEN. UPSON, 15th DIST.
                      SEN. SMITH, 8th DIST.
                     SEN. GUNTHER, 21st DIST.
                    SEN. LOVEGROVE, 28th DIST.
                     SEN. HAMPTON, 33rd DIST.
                    SEN. SCARPETTI, 22nd DIST.
                      SEN. SOMMA, 16th DIST.
                      SEN. EADS, 30th DIST.
                    SEN. FREEDMAN, 26th DIST.
                      SEN. SCOTT, 14th DIST.
                    SEN. BENVENUTO, 36th DIST.
                    SEN. ROBERTSON, 34th DIST.

                       ____________________

                         PETITION NO. 12

    In  accordance  with  the  provisions of Joint  Rule  11,  the
Committee on Appropriations is  respectfully  requested to draft a
Bill  based  on Proposed Senate Bill No.  668,  entitled  "AN  ACT
CONCERNING THE CONNECTICUT BUDGET PROCESS".

                    SEN. FREEDMAN, 26th DIST.
                      SEN. EADS, 30th DIST.
                    SEN. LOVEGROVE, 28th DIST.
                     SEN. GUNTHER, 21st DIST.
                      SEN. SMITH, 8th DIST.
                      SEN. UPSON, 15th DIST.
                     SEN. HAMPTON, 33rd DIST.
                     SEN. MORTON, 23rd DIST.
                      SEN. SOMMA, 16th DIST.
                    SEN. BENVENUTO, 36th DIST.
                      SEN. SCOTT, 14th DIST.

                       ____________________

                         PETITION NO. 13

    In  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Joint  Rule 11, the
Committee  on Human Services is respectfully requested to draft  a
Bill based on Proposed  Senate  Bill  No.   617,  entitled "AN ACT
ALLOWING TRANSFER OF RESIDENCE TO A HANDICAPPED CHILD WITHOUT LOSS
OF ELIGIBILITY UNDER STATE MEDICAL  ASSISTANCE WHEN THE TRANSFEROR
IS AGE SIXTY-FIVE OR OVER".

                    SEN. BENVENUTO, 36th DIST.
                    SEN. FREEDMAN, 26th DIST.
                      SEN. EADS, 30th DIST.
                     SEN. HAMPTON, 33rd DIST.
                    SEN. SCARPETTI, 22nd DIST.
                      SEN. SOMMA, 16th DIST.
                      SEN. UPSON, 15th DIST.
                    SEN. ROBERTSON, 34th DIST.
                    SEN. LOVEGROVE, 28th DIST.
                     SEN. GUNTHER, 21st DIST.
                   SEN. McLAUGHLIN, 32nd DIST.
                      SEN. SCOTT, 14th DIST.

                       ____________________

                         PETITION NO. 14

    In  accordance  with  the provisions of  Joint  Rule  11,  the
Committee on Human Services is  respectfully  requested to draft a
Bill  based  on  Proposed Senate Bill No.  495, entitled  "AN  ACT
ALLOWING  TRANSFER  OF   RESIDENCE  TO  PARENTS  WITHOUT  LOSS  OF
ELIGIBILITY  UNDER MEDICAL ASSISTANCE WHEN TRANSFEROR AND  PARENTS
ARE AGE SIXTY-FIVE OR OVER".

                    SEN. BENVENUTO, 36th DIST.
                    SEN. FREEDMAN, 26th DIST.
                      SEN. EADS, 30th DIST.
                    SEN. LOVEGROVE, 28th DIST.
                     SEN. GUNTHER, 21st DIST.
                      SEN. SMITH, 8th DIST.
                     SEN. HAMPTON, 33rd DIST.
                    SEN. SCARPETTI, 22nd DIST.
                      SEN. SOMMA, 16th DIST.
                      SEN. UPSON, 15th DIST.
                    SEN. ROBERTSON, 34th DIST.
                      SEN. SCOTT, 14th DIST.

                       ____________________

                     BUSINESS FROM THE HOUSE
                     HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTIONS
                       RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED

    The  following  favorable reports were taken from  the  table,
read the third time, the reports of the committee accepted and the
resolutions adopted.

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  48 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE DOUGLASS B. WRIGHT OF  WEST  HARTFORD,  TO  BE  A
STATE REFEREE.

    Senator  Avallone  of  the 11th explained the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    Remarking favorably on the resolution was Senator Upson of the
15th.

    Remarking  unfavorably  on  all   the  resolution  was Senator
Gunther of the 21st.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  49 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE WALTER R. BUDNEY OF IVORYTON, TO BE  A  JUDGE  OF
THE SUPERIOR COURT.

    Senator  Avallone  of  the 11th explained the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  50 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE JOSEPH W. BOGDANSKI OF MERIDEN,  TO  BE  A  STATE
REFEREE.

    Senator  Avallone  of the 11th explained  the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  51 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE ELAINE GORDON OF BRANFORD, TO BE A JUDGE  OF  THE
SUPERIOR COURT.

    Senator  Avallone  of  the 11th explained the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    Remarking favorably on the  resolution was Senator Sullivan of
the 12th.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  52 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE ANDRE M. KOCAY OF WEST HARTFORD, TO BE A JUDGE OF
THE SUPERIOR COURT.

    Senator  Avallone  of  the 11th explained the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    Remarking  favorably  on the resolution was Senator Harper  of
the 6th.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  53 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE GEORGE W. RIPLEY OF GLASTONBURY, TO BE A JUDGE OF
THE SUPERIOR COURT.

    Senator  Avallone  of  the 11th explained the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    Remarking favorably on the  resolution  was  Senator Meotti of
the 4th.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  54 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE A. WILLIAM MOTTOLESE OF COS COB, TO BE A JUDGE OF
THE SUPERIOR COURT.

    Senator  Avallone  of  the 11th explained the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    Remarking favorably on the resolution was Senator Benvenuto of
the 36th.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  55 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE JOHN M. ALEXANDER  OF  WINDSOR,  TO  BE  A  STATE
REFEREE.

    Senator  Avallone  of  the 11th explained the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  47 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE MARSHALL K. BERGER, JR. OF CANTON, TO BE A  JUDGE
OF THE SUPERIOR COURT.

    Senator  Avallone  of  the 11th explained the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

                     BUSINESS FROM THE HOUSE
                      HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION
                  UNDER SUSPENSION OF THE RULES
                        RESOLUTION ADOPTED

    The  following favorable report was taken from the table, read
the third time, the report of  the  committee  indicated, accepted
and the resolution adopted.

    JUDICIARY.  H.J.  No.  60 RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION
OF THE HONORABLE JOHN J. RYAN OF GREENWICH, TO BE A JUDGE  OF  THE
SUPERIOR COURT.

    Senator Avallone of the  11th  explained  the  resolution  and
moved its adoption.

    Remarking unfavorably on the resolution was Senator  Lovegrove
of the 28th.

    Remarking favorably on the  resolution  was Senator Blumenthal
of the 27th.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

                     BUSINESS ON THE CALENDAR
        FAVORABLE REPORTS OF THE JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE
              EXECUTIVE AND LEGISLATIVE NOMINATIONS
                       RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED

    The  following  favorable reports were taken from  the  table,
read the third time, the reports of the committee accepted and the
resolutions adopted.

    EXECUTIVE  AND LEGISLATIVE NOMINATIONS. S.J. No. 20 RESOLUTION
CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF DANA S. HANSON OF NEWINGTON, TO BE AN
AD  HOC  MEMBER  OF  THE CONNECTICUT RESOURCES RECOVERY AUTHORITY,
MID-CONNECTICUT PROJECT.

    Senator Morton of the 23rd  explained the resolution and moved
its adoption.

    Remarking favorably on the resolution  was Senator Matthews of
the 9th.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

    EXECUTIVE  AND LEGISLATIVE NOMINATIONS. S.J. No. 21 RESOLUTION
CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF ROBERT EMIL MILLER, Ph.D. OF  POMFRET
CENTER,  TO  BE  A  MEMBER  OF  THE  NEW  ENGLAND  BOARD OF HIGHER
EDUCATION.

    Senator Morton of the 23rd  explained the resolution and moved
its adoption.

    Remarking  favorably on the resolution were Senators  Johnston
of the 29th, Sullivan of the 12th and Herbst of the 35th.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the resolution was adopted.

                       ____________________

                     BUSINESS ON THE CALENDAR
        FAVORABLE REPORTS OF THE JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES
                           BILLS PASSED

    The following  favorable  reports  were  taken from the table,
read  the third time, the reports of the committees  accepted  and
the bills passed.

    FINANCE,  REVENUE  AND  BONDING.  Substitute  for S.B. No. 200
(RAISED) (File No. 4) AN ACT CONCERNING  BOND  AUTHORIZATIONS  FOR
THE ARTS ENDOWMENT FUND.

    Senator Sullivan of the 5th  explained  the bill and moved its
passage.

    The chair ordered the vote be taken by roll call.

    The following is the result of the vote:


    On the roll call vote the bill was passed.

                       ____________________

                           ADJOURNMENT

    On motion of Senator O'Leary  of  the  7th, the Senate at 2:50
p.m.  adjourned subject to the call of the chair.

                       ____________________

                     BUSINESS FROM THE HOUSE
                       CHANGE OF REFERENCE
                           HOUSE BILL

    The following report on House  Bill,  recommending a change of
reference was received from the committee indicated, the report of
the committee accepted, and the bill referred as recommended:

    JUDICIARY.   H.B.   No.   7178   (RAISED)  AN  ACT  CONCERNING
RETIREMENT CREDIT AS A SCHOOL NURSE.
    The bill was then referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

                       ____________________

                         JOINT CONVENTION

    The  Honorable  Senate, preceded by the  Honorable  Lieutenant
Governor and  the  Clerks  of  the  Senate,  entered  the House of
Representatives and met the House in Joint Convention.

    The  President  of the Senate called the Joint  Convention  to
order.

    The prayer was offered by the Senate Chaplain, Reverend Joseph
A. Devine of Waterbury, Connecticut.

    The following is the prayer.

    Let  us  pray:  Almighty  God,  we  come  together  in   Joint
Convention today to evaluate the needs of our state. May our sense
of  values  guide  us to prudence in planning and realism  in  our
priorities.  Bless our Governor  Bill  O'Neill, the members of our
Senate  and  House  of  Representatives that  they  might  have  a
discerning sensitivity in these  days  when the needs are so great
and the shrinking dollars are so short. May they have a wisdom and
a conviction that grows  out  of  a  sincere  understanding of the
concerns and the needs of all the people of our state. We ask this
through our Heavenly Father. Amen.

                       ____________________

                       PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

    The  Joint Convention recited the Pledge of Allegiance to  the
Flag.

                       ____________________

                   JOINT CONVENTION RESOLUTIONS
                       RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED

    The following Joint  Convention  Resolutions  were introduced,
read and adopted.

    J.C.  No.  22  SEN.  O'LEARY,  7th  DIST.; REP. FRANKEL, 121st
DIST. RESOLUTION RAISING A COMMITTEE TO INFORM THE  GOVERNOR  THAT
THE   SENATE  AND  HOUSE  OF  REPRESENTATIVES  ARE  MET  IN  JOINT
CONVENTION TO RECEIVE HIS BUDGET MESSAGE.

    On a motion of Senator O'Leary of the 7th, the resolution  was
adopted.

    The following is the resolution.

Resolved by this Assembly:
    That a committee of two  Senators  and  two Representatives be
appointed to inform His Excellency, the Governor, that the  Senate
and the House of Representatives  are  met in Joint Convention for
the purpose of receiving his message concerning the budget.

    The  President  appointed Senator O'Leary of the 7th,  Senator
Smith of  the  8th,  and  Representative  Frankel  of  the  121st,
Representative Jaekle of the 122nd Districts.

                       ____________________

    The  Governor thereupon appeared in the Hall of the House,  to
deliver his budget address.

                       ____________________

    J.C.  No.  23  SEN.  O'LEARY,  7th  DIST.; REP. FRANKEL, 121st
DIST. RESOLUTION CONCERNING THE PRINTING OF THE GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE
CONCERNING THE BUDGET.

    On  motion of Senator O'Leary of the 7th, the  resolution  was
adopted.

    The following is the resolution.

Resolved by this Assembly:
    That  the  message  of the Governor concerning the  budget  be
printed in  the  journals  of  the  Senate  and  House  and that a
sufficient number of copies be printed for general distribution.

    After the Governor gave his budget address, Senator O'Leary of
the 7th moved for dissolution of the Convention.

    The President thereupon dissolved the Joint Convention and the
Senate withdrew.

                       ____________________

                        GOVERNOR O'NEILL'S
                       1989 BUDGET ADDRESS
                 BEFORE THE 1989 GENERAL ASSEMBLY
                         February 8, 1989

    Lieutenant  Governor,  Mr.  Speaker, Mr.  President,  Reverend
Clergy, ladies and gentlemen of the  House and Senate, good people
of Connecticut:

    It  has been five weeks since I last stood here before you--35
days that have been  as  difficult  a  period  as I've experienced
since I became Governor eight years ago. Since January 4th, I have
devoted most of  my  waking  hours  to  working  on the budget for
1989-1990  that  I now present to you in this chamber--and to  the
people all across Connecticut.

    The days, as I say, have not passed easily. As I grappled with
the  many aspects of this document--and as the shadows  lengthened
outside my  office  window--I  often  found  myself  thinking very
deeply about this state that I love and know so well.  I reflected
upon  Connecticut's  industry  and   its  institutions,  upon  its
wonderful strengths and the challenges that lie before it.

    But most of all, I thought about the people of Connecticut and
the society that you and I  have  built  together  during the past
eight  years.  I looked at Connecticut as it struggled earlier  in
this decade, as it exists today, and as it can exist tomorrow. And
I  weighed  the  role  that  state  government  has  had  in   our
progress--in our  undeniable  progress  in  education, in road and
bridge  repair, in programs for the elderly and the poor,  in  our
battles against  drugs  and  pollution--in  fact,  in  raising the
entire level of our society to a point where it is widely  admired
and widely imitated.

    I have emerged from this process with a feeling of great pride
in  what  my  administration  has  achieved  with  the  people  of
Connecticut--and of great  expectation  for what we can achieve in
the future.  It is true that we have obstacles to overcome in  the
days ahead; it is never easy to  remain  Number One.  But it is my
strong  feeling that we must remain positive and confident in  our
approach, and that government must take a positive and responsible
role in the lives of its citizens.

    Today, I present  this  budget  to  you,  the  members of this
General  Assembly.  Today, our work together begins.  I think  you
will find it to be an   honest,   straightforward   document.   It
represents  an  8.9% overall increase in  expenditures,  including
$661 million in the Special  Transportation Fund, $5.09 billion in
the  General Fund, and $1.2 billion in a newly-funded  Educational
Excellence Fund--for a total  $6.97  billion.  I believe that this
budget's  many  features will properly maintain the  economic  and
social progress that has marked Connecticut's  journey through the
1980's.

    But this is also a budget formulated in a different atmosphere
than we have enjoyed in recent  years.   Our fiscal picture is not
as bright as it was a year or two ago.  We have felt the effect of
an unanticipated dip in our  revenues from the state sales and use
tax,  combined with increased spending in several vital areas such
as Corrections.  In addition, as you know, a major factor has been
the  Federal  Tax  Reform Act of 1986, which  has  created  budget
difficulties not only here in  Connecticut, but also in many other
states  and  in  the  federal  government as  well,  where  it  is
responsible for an estimated $24 billion  of this year's projected
federal deficit of $161 billion.

    In any  event,  our  string   of  budget  surpluses  has  most
decidedly  and most abruptly come to an end--so abruptly, in fact,
that many rightfully concerned  citizens  have lately been asking
the question: Where did the surplus go?

    Well,  I will answer that question, because there has  been  a
great deal of misinformation regarding it.  The surpluses totalled
about  $1.1 billion over a four-year period.  Of that amount,  the
vast majority--about $1  billion--went  into  the following areas:
More than $300 million is going right back to the towns and cities
of Connecticut where your  local  mayors  and  selectmen use it to
keep  down your local property taxes.  More than $370 million went
into our Educational  Excellence  Trust  Fund,  where it was again
sent  back  to municipalities across the state to help  begin  the
hard push toward  educational  excellence  for our children.  That
makes  a  total of more than $670 million that has  gone  directly
back to the towns and cities of  Connecticut--and that has allowed
local  governments  to  hold  the line on and  even  reduce  local
property taxes.

    The last major use of the  surplus has been our Budget Reserve
Fund,  where  $183  million  has  been used  to  meet  the  budget
shortfalls of the past two years.  Contrary to the belief of many,
however, this fund is far from depleted.  It contains $130 million
today--and it will continue to  contain $130 million if the budget
I present to you is adopted in a timely fashion.

    All  told, this, I believe, has been a responsible use of  the
surplus.  It was not frittered  away  or wasted.  It was, in large
part,  returned  to  the people who created it:  the  citizens  of
Connecticut. And it was no doubt because this surplus was returned
to   our  cities  and  towns  that  148  of  the  156  Connecticut
municipalities reporting last year  could claim surpluses of their
own--totalling some $174 million--in their operating budgets.

    I  think it's about time that we at the state level took  some
of the credit we deserve for  the  state's  enormous role in these
local  success  stories! It's about time that the people  at  home
realized that each year  nearly  $2  billion  in  state money goes
directly back to their towns where it pays for teacher  retirement
costs, helps pay for local  services  and salaries, and holds down
local taxes.

    But  today  we enter a period  of  significant  challenges--of
retrenchment,  as  I  have  called  it--and  we  must respond with
appropriate measures. However much we may wish to say "yes" to all
the voices that cry for new  state  dollars--$6 billion for a Long
Island Sound clean-up, $8 billion for local road repair,  billions
more for universal health  care--we  must also be responsible.  We
must  ferret  out the places where growth can be curbed and  where
state agencies can and will exercise restraint.

    This budget does  that.   It  calls  for  state agencies, as a
whole,  to  make do with less than they believe necessary just  to
maintain basic services.  Almost  1,300 jobs have been eliminated.
Vacancies,  in  many  cases, will not be  filled.   I  will  order
lay-offs when and where they are appropriate.

    In addition, I am calling for  further  belt-tightening in our
state  agencies.   We  will reduce or  totally  eliminate  certain
inflationary increases in  all  our  departments.   We will reduce
funding for part-time and temporary positions. We will cut back on
the use of overtime. I  am  calling  for  the agencies to purchase
only  equipment that is essential, to cut back on travel by up  to
50%--and I am ordering state  government  to put the brakes on the
use of consultants.

    We  will  continue  to  eliminate  the  needless  expense  and
confusion  brought  on  by  duplication  of  effort.   I  recently
announced   just   such  a  consolidation  in  our  job   training
program--and we will soon do  much   the same in the area of child
welfare,  where,  in  the coming year, we will  endeavor  to  keep
children safe and families  together by fundamentally streamlining
and improving the existing service delivery system.

    Through these and other significant measures we have been able
to  reduce  our   agencies'   budget   requests   by  nearly  $400
million--and continue the process of making the machinery of state
government as lean and responsive as we can make it.  I can assure
you  that these cuts are not superficial.  They will cause pain in
the state agencies, and in  places  they will be noticeable to the
public. But I believe they are necessary.

    What is left, beyond these reductions and changes, is a budget
that is carefully  considered  and  that, I believe, will continue
Connecticut's drive to greatness.

    I  have been proud during the past eight years to preside over
a period of wonderful  prosperity  and  development in this state.
The process has not always been easy, and we've had some difficult
stretches along the way--but  overall,  our  story has been a good
one. Our people are working and prospering and I believe, in great
part, happy with their lives. Our quality of life is unmatched. We
have  been  able  to address some of  the  enormous  and  pressing
problems of our day with  solutions  that have been broad and bold
and effective.

    Ladies and gentlemen, I am not about to stand here and preside
over the dismantlement of all we've worked so hard to accomplish!

    For if we are to be great, as we must always strive to be, our
greatness will be measured in our determination to go forward with
the programs we know to be right  and  good. Our greatness will be
measured  not in our eagerness to deny, but in our willingness  to
assist. Our greatness will be  measured  in our ability to act now
so that we don't have to re-act later.

    State  government is asked to do an enormous amount--and I  am
proud of the way Connecticut has  answered  that challenge. During
this  decade, for example, we at the state level have had to  take
on increased  responsibility  in  many  areas  in which the federal
government has ruthlessly pulled away from its own commitments.

    A look at some of these federal pullbacks is revealing.  Since
1981, federal grants for job  training  have been reduced from $81
million to $13 million; federal grants for student loans have been
dropped from $226 million to $80  million; federal revenue sharing
grants--money  that  went to our cities--went from $54 million  to
zero.  And, ladies  and  gentlemen,  federal grants for subsidized
housing  have gone from $650 million in 1981 to $110 million  last
year. In fact, if we take  federal grants in 20 key areas, such as
clean  water,  child  care,  highway funds, and  the  ones I  have
mentioned--and adjust for inflation--the State of Connecticut last
year  received $1.2 billion less in federal funds than it  did  in
1981. In all of these areas, the  federal government--during eight
years  of Republican administration--has simply taken a walk,  and
we have had to step  in  with  state  dollars  to  take over these
programs and run them.

    And during the last  six  years,  while  we were taking on all
these  essential and costly additional programs, the taxpayers  of
this state did not pay a single  dollar  in new general taxes.  In
fact, they enjoyed tax cuts totalling more than a billion dollars.
Never in the history of this state,  I believe, has our prosperity
been so evident.

    Today,  however,  if Connecticut is to continue its  drive  to
greatness--as I believe  it  must--  we  will  need new sources of
revenue.   If  the programs and services that set  us  apart  from
other states in our vision, our decency, and our compassion are to
carry on, then we will have to pay something more for them.

    The budget I present to you today calls for four new taxes. It
does not call for an income tax!  I have made every effort to make
these  new  taxes  fair and equitable to all, according  to  their
ability to pay.

    I am first  requesting  a  10%  surcharge  on  taxes  paid  by
corporate  businesses--to begin to stem the losses due to  federal
tax reform--as well as an  increase in the minimum corporation tax
from  $100  to  $250.  These measures would take effect  with  the
income year beginning January 1, 1989.

    I am also asking for two  changes  in  the state sales and use
tax.   First, an elimination of the exemption--effective April  1,
1989--of the  existing  7.5%  sales  tax  on  certain  services to
businesses,  including  but  not limited  to  legal,  engineering,
architectural, surveying, and  accounting  services.  Second, I am
asking  that--beginning April 1, 1989--the sales tax exemption  be
lifted from all public utility services, including but not limited
to  telephone,  telecommunications,  gas, electricity,  and  cable
television.

    And to protect the poor, the handicapped, and the elderly from
unfair  treatment under this tax, I am also proposing  legislation
that will provide rate breaks to  those  who qualify under certain
income and other guidelines.

    Finally,  I  am  calling  for all capital gains  to  be  fully
incorporated into the current  interest  and  dividends tax rates,
effective for transactions occurring after February 8, 1989.   Two
years ago, when the federal  government  initiated this measure, I
exempted Connecticut taxpayers from doing the same, simply because
we did not need the money.   Now  I  propose  that we fall in line
with the federal example as most other states have done.

    Taken together, these new taxes will raise $688 million in new
revenue for the State of  Connecticut.   These funds will allow us
to  maintain  our  strength and our stability  at  all  levels  of
society.

    I understand the call for  greater  budget cuts.  I can assure
you that I understand its appeal to the citizens of this state. No
one likes to pay taxes.  I don't like  to pay taxes, either. But I
also  possess  a  basic  faith in our  state  government  here  in
Connecticut.  I believe  that  there  are  important  needs, vital
needs out across the face of this state and I am not going to turn
my back on them--and I don't think  the people of Connecticut want
me to turn my back on these needs.

    I  will not turn my back on the elderly, for instance, or  the
landmark  ConnPACE  program   which   for  so  many  has eased the
financial strains brought on by the cost of prescription drugs.

    I  will not turn my back on the homeless--who need the shelter
that state funds help provide.  Or on the working poor or those of
moderate  means who might need a hand up--not a  handout--as  they
seek decent and  affordable  housing--especially  in  light of the
federal government's disgraceful neglect in this area.

    I  will  not turn my back on the jobless--as  they  and  their
potential employers seek the  benefits  of a revamped job training
program.   And I will not turn my back on the poor, as we work  to
take them off the public  welfare  rolls  and into the dignity and
pride of real jobs.

    I will not turn my back  on  the  needs  of  the environment--
especially  our  need  for  open space; or  on  the  families  and
businesses that benefit from a safe and dependable system of child
day  care in this state; or on our motorists, who  deserve a  full
commitment to the continuation  of  the road and bridge rebuilding
program.

    I  will not turn my back on economic development, which is  so
important if Connecticut companies are to continue to innovate and
breed  the  new industries and new products that we need  for  our
future jobs and our future well-being.

    In all of these areas, we have basic commitments to keep.   If
we've told the  people  of  Connecticut  that  we  are going to do
certain things, then we ought to do them.  I am not proposing that
we pump new money and new programs into these parts of the budget,
but I don't believe we need to inflict them with deep and  hurtful
cuts either.

    However, there does exist in  this  state one area of powerful
and  continuing importance that, I believe, demands an  additional
commitment from us all--and that is the education of our children.

    I will not turn my back  on  the  children  of Connecticut.  I
will not forsake them as they make their way into the complexities
of life in the 21st century.  My pledge to excellence in education
remains  absolutely firm.  I have said many times that we  possess
no natural  resources  here  in  Connecticut,  no  oil  fields, no
reserves   of  natural  gas,  no  vast  agricultural  lands.    In
Connecticut, our main resource  is  our people, and our ability to
think  hard  and  work  hard as we  face  the  increasingly  tough
competition of the global marketplace.

    Consequently, our ability to  educate  our children thoroughly
is  essential if the successes we enjoy today are to continue into
the next generation.  You can be  sure  that the children in Japan
are  preparing and the children in West Germany and Korea and  the
Soviet  Union  are  preparing.    We   can't  afford  to  wait for
Washington  to move in this vital area.  We in Connecticut have to
move--and that's exactly what  we've  been doing.  Our Educational
Excellence  Program is a national model.  Our willingness to raise
teachers'  salaries--to   attract   bright  young  talent into the
teaching  profession--shows  not only that we are concerned  about
the quality of our teachers,  but,  more  importantly, that we are
concerned about our children, and their future, and the future  of
this state.

    As  a  continuation  of  my  commitment  to  education,  I  am
proposing  today  that we restructure our  Educational  Excellence
Fund as a  permanently-funded  feature  of  state government--and,
indeed, that we dedicate all the revenue from our four new  taxes,
plus several existing  revenue  sources,  to  this education fund.
State government now pays for virtually half the cost of our local
schools--some $1.2 billion that  local  school systems plan on and
depend  upon.   We  owe  it  to our children  and  our  future  to
establish a fund that is  stable  and  that  will distribute money
fairly  in  the  years ahead to the towns of  Connecticut  without
putting an undue burden on the local taxpayer.

    No, I will not turn  my  back  on  any  of  these needs.  I am
willing  to  stand  squarely before you and say that  we  have  an
obligation to do what we can  afford to do.  We in Connecticut are
not  overtaxed.   In  fact, we rank 48th out of the 50  states  in
state and local general revenues per $1,000 of personal income. It
is my belief that if we are the richest state in the nation--which
we are--we  must  also  strive  to  continue  to  be  the greatest
state--for all our citizens, not just the ones at the top.

    I  must warn you today, however, that all of our work, all  of
our  accomplishments,  are  at  risk  if  we  cannot guarantee our
citizens  their  inalienable right to a safe society.   I  believe
that our most important fight in  the year ahead will be the fight
to  rid  our streets and our society of the scourge of  drugs  and
crime that threatens to make victims of us all.

    I want the word to  go  out  today  from  this podium to every
crack  den, to every schoolyard drug dealer, to every drug-twisted
criminal across this state: We will  find you, we will arrest you,
we  will convict you, we will take away your property and we  will
put you in jail.

    It is essential that this message  go out, and that we back it
up.  I am urging today that we supply our criminal justice  system
with whatever it needs to  fight  this  battle  effectively.  I am
calling  for more than 200 new judges, state's  attorneys,  public
defenders, deputy  sheriffs,  investigators,  and support staff to
help  reduce the caseload and provide early screening of  criminal
cases.  The cost of these  new  positions  I  propose be offset by
increased fines and fees, so that criminals pay the cost of crime.

    In  addition, I am calling for the continued  construction  of
new jail cells here in  Connecticut.   The budget I present to you
today provides for the completion of nearly 1,400 new prison  beds
by the end of the 1990 fiscal  year, with another 2,000 in various
stages  of  planning  or  construction.  We will  also  be  adding
personnel to staff  these  facilities,  as  well  as for community
services, parole services, addiction services, and halfway houses.

    And,  most importantly in the long run, we must  continue  our
efforts in educating our  young  ones  against  the perils of drug
use--so that the drug pushers will no longer find customers.   And
we must continue to treat  those  who  seek  treatment so they can
once again join the rest of us in building and maintaining a  safe
society.

    For it is  our  common  goal--and  certainly  it is my fondest
hope--that  we  can create a Connecticut that is whole and  sound,
that offers fairness to all, and opportunity to all who would take
it.   That is the driving force behind this budget, and I hope  it
will be the motivation for your deliberations  and your actions in
the months ahead.

    In developing this budget, it has been my belief that we  must
cut where we can, but we must  not  cut for the sake of cutting or
to   satisfy   a  political  agenda.   That, I  think   would   be
irresponsible.  We  must  remember  that  every program cut has an
effect on the people in this state, invariably upon people who are
in need.  If we cut the program,  the  problem does not disappear,
the need will not evaporate.  Inevitably, the cost will have to be
picked up by local governments  or  the suffering will spread--and
the  problems  will grow more pervasive and eventually  much  more
expensive to solve.

    By the same token, there is a  limit  as to what we can fairly
ask  of the citizens of Connecticut.  We must make sure that  this
state remains vibrant and  competitive  in  all respects.  We must
strive to make state government efficient and cost effective.   We
must make sensible use  of  the  taxpayers's  money,  which  means
eliminating  duplication  and  weeding out the  unneeded  and  the
unwanted.  All of this,  I  can  assure,  you,  I  am dedicated to
doing.

    But,  ultimately,  as  we consider this budget,  we  must  ask
ourselves a simple question.   Have we built in Connecticut a fair
and  decent society--one that works well for the vast majority  of
the people most of  the  time--and,  if  so, is that society worth
maintaining?

    I  am proud to stand before you today and assert that what  we
have built is worth  maintaining.   For  it is nothing less than a
framework   for  our  daily  lives  as  we  work  and  dream   and
strive--together and  individually--in  this small and exceptional
state.

    There  is greatness everywhere we look in Connecticut.   There
is wisdom and stability  in  our  institutions.   There  is common
sense  and compassion and ingenuity in our people.  Let it be  our
job in the weeks ahead to seize those virtues and put them to work
in  all  we  do.   We owe no less to the good  men  and  women  of
Connecticut who have put their trust in us.