Location:
EXECUTIVE AND LEGISLATIVE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE;
Scope:
Connecticut laws/regulations;

OLR Research Report


April 30, 2013

 

2013-R-0226

QUESTIONS FOR NOMINEE TO CRRA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

By: Kristen L. Miller, Legislative Analyst II

CONNECTICUT RESOURCES RECOVERY AUTHORITY (CRRA) (CGS 22A-261 AND 262)

● The authority's board of directors consists of 11 members appointed by the governor and legislative leaders. The governor appoints three members, and the Senate president pro tempore, the House speaker, the Senate minority leader, and House minority leader each appoint two members.

● Three directors must represent towns with a population of fewer than 50,000 and two must represent towns with populations greater than 50,000.

● Five directors represent the public and must have extensive, high-level experience in a specified field. Three must be experienced in finance, business, or industry; one in an environmental field; and one in an energy field.

● Directors serve four-year terms and must be confirmed by both houses. The governor designates one member to serve as chairman, with the advice and consent of both houses. The chairman serves at the governor's pleasure.

● CRRA is a quasi-public agency that plans, designs, builds, and operates solid waste disposal, volume reduction, recycling, intermediate processing, and resources recovery facilities. The chairman, with approval of the board of directors, appoints the authority's president, who supervises the authority's administrative affairs and technical activities.

CURRENT ISSUES

1. A recent study commissioned by CRRA found that recycling — a $746 million industry employing about 4,800 people — is a growing sector of the state's economy.

a. What is the future of the recycling industry and its projected economic impact? Do you believe the demand for recycled products will grow?

b. What changes do you foresee in recycling technology and practices?

c. Is CRRA using the latest recycling technology and techniques? How quickly does CRRA adapt to changes in technology?

2. What do you believe will be the most pressing issues for CRRA's board this year?

ENERGY EXPERTISE

1. You were appointed to CRRA's board because you have specific subject area expertise in the energy field. How will that expertise, particularly as the Executive Director at UConn's Center for Energy and Environmental Law, benefit the board?

2. What is the difference, if any, in the financial benefit to CRRA between burning solid waste to generate energy and sell it to the electrical grid and selling the recyclables it collects on the commodity market? How volatile are these respective markets?

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AND RECYCLING

1. Connecticut's recycling rate has remained near 30% for a number of years.

a. How effective is single-stream recycling at increasing the rate of recycling?

b. Do you believe that programs such as “pay-as-you-throw” are effective at increasing recycling and reducing solid waste disposal?

c. Are “producer responsibility” laws (i.e., requiring producers of certain products to ensure proper disposal or recycling) effective at reducing the amount of solid waste disposed of in Connecticut?

d. Do you believe the state will reach its goal of achieving a 58% recycling rate by 2024? What are the greatest impediments to reaching this goal?

2. Should the state expand the list of mandatory recyclable items? If so, what items would you add to the list?

3. About 25% to 30% of municipal solid waste is food and lawn waste. What has CRRA done to encourage composting? How can municipalities encourage their residents to reduce food and lawn waste?

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