Location:
EXECUTIVE AND LEGISLATIVE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE;
Scope:
Connecticut laws/regulations;

OLR Research Report


January 22, 2013

 

2013-R-0062

QUESTIONS FOR NOMINEE TO CRRA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

By: Kristen L. Miller, Legislative Analyst II

CONNECTICUT RESOURCES RECOVERY AUTHORITY (CRRA) (CGS 22A-261 AND 262)

● The authority's board of directors consists of 11 members appointed by the governor and legislative leaders. The governor appoints three members, and the Senate president pro tempore, the House speaker, the Senate minority leader, and House minority leader each appoint two members.

● Three directors must represent towns with a population of fewer than 50,000 and two must represent towns with populations greater than 50,000.

● Five directors represent the public and must have extensive, high-level experience in a specified field. Three must be experienced in finance, business, or industry; one in an environmental field; and one in an energy field.

● Directors serve four-year terms and must be confirmed by both houses. The governor designates one member to serve as chairman, with the advice and consent of both houses. The chairman serves at the governor's pleasure.

● CRRA is a quasi-public agency that plans, designs, builds, and operates solid waste disposal, volume reduction, recycling, intermediate processing, and resources recovery facilities. The chairman, with approval of the board of directors, appoints the president of the authority, who supervises the authority's administrative affairs and technical activities.

CURRENT ISSUES

1. The economic climate has forced public and private entities to operate with smaller budgets. What steps has CRRA taken to operate more efficiently?

2. Over time, have tipping fees generally increased, decreased, or remained the same? What factors cause tipping fees to increase?

3. You were appointed to CRRA's board because you have a specific subject area expertise. How will that expertise benefit the board?

4. A recent study commissioned by CRRA found that recycling - a $746 million industry employing about 4,800 people - is a growing sector of the state's economy.

a. How do you see the state of the recycling industry and its impact on the economy? Will the industry continue to grow?

b. What changes do you foresee in recycling technology and practices?

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AND RECYCLING

1. Connecticut's recycling rate has remained near 30% for a number of years.

a. How effective is single-stream recycling at increasing the rate of recycling?

b. Do you believe that programs such as “pay-as-you-throw” would encourage people to recycle more?

c. Do you believe the state will reach its goal of achieving a 58% recycling rate by 2024?

2. Connecticut's bottle bill incentivizes people to recycle certain beverage containers by charging a five cent deposit on the containers and returning the deposit amount when the containers are recycled at certain facilities, such as retailers and redemption centers. Has the bottle bill been successful at encouraging recycling? Are there other ways that the state could increase the recycling rate for beverage containers?

3. Last year, Governor Malloy established a working group to evaluate and recommend changes to the state's recycling system. In December, the working group issued its report and, among other things, recommended promoting product stewardship principles to ensure shared responsibility for products during their lifetime. In recent legislative sessions, laws have passed to require the producers of certain products to ensure that they are properly disposed of or recycled. How effective are these types of programs at removing products from the waste stream?

4. Should the state expand the list of mandatory recyclable items? If so, what items would you add to the list?

5. About 25% to 30% of municipal solid waste is food and lawn waste. What has CRRA done to encourage composting? How can municipalities encourage their residents to reduce food and lawn waste?

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