OLR Bill Analysis

HB 6563

AN ACT CONCERNING THE OFFICE OF WORKFORCE COMPETITIVENESS.

SUMMARY:

This bill moves the Office of Workforce Competitiveness (OWC) from the Department of Labor (DOL) to the Office of Policy and Management (OPM). Along with this relocation, the bill:

1. reassigns duties previously shared with or performed exclusively by the labor commissioner to OWC;

2. designates OWC, rather than DOL, as the lead agency for development of employment training strategies and initiatives to support the state's position in the knowledge economy;

3. removes approval and reporting requirements imposed upon OWC under current law; and

4. repeals DOL's implied authorization of orders and regulations issued by OWC, as well as DOL's authority to implement its own policies when OWC orders and regulations conflict with DOL's policies.

The bill also makes conforming and technical changes to reflect OWC's relocation to OPM.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

REASSIGNED DUTIES FOLLOWING OWC RELOCATION TO OPM

Table 1: Reassigned Duties

DUTY

CURRENT ASSIGNMENT

ASSIGNMENT UNTIL THE BILL

BILL SECTION

Serve as governor's principal workforce development policy advisor

Labor commissioner, with the assistance of OWC

OWC

1

Serve as liaison between governor and any local, state, or federal organization or entity for workforce development matters

Labor commissioner, with the assistance of OWC

OWC

1

Coordinate workforce development activities of all state agencies

Labor commissioner, with the assistance of OWC

OWC

1

Coordinate state implementation of federal Workforce Investment Act of 1998, and advise and assist the governor with related matters

Labor commissioner, with the assistance of OWC

OWC

1

Establish methods and procedures to ensure maximum involvement of members of public, legislature, and local officials in workforce development matters

Labor commissioner, with the assistance of OWC

OWC

1

Enter into contractual agreements to carry out duties

Labor commissioner, with the assistance of OWC

OWC

1

Submit annual report to Governor and Education, Commerce, Labor, and Higher Education Committees about workforce shortages with recommended methods for addressing needs

Labor commissioner, with the assistance of OWC and DOL

OWC

1

Call for and receive reports and information from any office, department, board, commission, or other agency as needed to carry out duties

Labor commissioner

OWC

1

Select nine public members of the Connecticut Career Ladder Advisory Committee (see BACKGROUND)

Labor commissioner, with recommendation of OWC staff, in conjunction with Permanent Commission on the Status of Women

OWC, in conjunction with Permanent Commission on the Status of Women

2

Create an integrated system of state-wide industry advisory committees for each career cluster offered by technical high school and regional community technical college systems

Labor commissioner, with assistance of OWC

OWC

3

Support industry advisory committees in the establishment of skills standards, curricula, and career ladders

DOL, technical high school and regional community technical college systems, and State Department of Education

OWC, technical high school and regional community technical college systems, and State Department of Education

3

Funding of Connecticut Career Choices (within available appropriations)

DOL, working with OWC

OWC

6

Identify areas where local or regional boards of education should expand their academic offerings

Labor commissioner and OWC

OWC

7

ELIMINATED APPROVAL AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

This bill eliminates the requirement that OWC receive labor commissioner approval for written participation guidelines it establishes for the film industry training program. It also removes the requirement that OWC report to the labor commissioner on the status of the film industry training program.

BACKGROUND

Connecticut Career Ladder Advisory Committee Purpose and Membership

The Connecticut Career Ladder Advisory Committee promotes the creation of new career ladder programs and the enhancement of existing career ladder programs for occupations in Connecticut with a projected workforce shortage. It consists of 13 members: (1) the commissioners of labor, education, and public health; (2) the president of the Board of Regents for Higher Education; and (3) nine public members with various areas of specific expertise.

Areas of public members' expertise include:

1. development of the early childhood education workforce,

2. job training for women,

3. development of the health care workforce,

4. labor market analysis,

5. health care employers,

6. early childhood education employers, and

7. workforce development programs.

COMMITTEE ACTION

Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee

Joint Favorable

Yea

13

Nay

7

(03/26/2013)