Location:
CRIME AND CRIMINALS; VOTING;
Scope:
Connecticut laws/regulations;

OLR Research Report


April 27, 2012

 

2012-R-0175

VOTING RIGHTS OF FELONS CONVICTED IN ANOTHER STATE

By: Kristin Sullivan, Principal Analyst

You asked whether an individual who is convicted of a felony in another state, and serves time there, may subsequently register to vote in Connecticut after moving here.

An individual who is convicted of a felony in another state, and serves his or her required time there, may register to vote in Connecticut after moving here if he or she meets all the other registration requirements.

By law, an individual forfeits his or her right to become an elector (a voter) upon conviction of a felony and commitment to any state or federal prison (CGS 9-46). An individual may subsequently register to vote in Connecticut if he or she (1) has paid all fines and completed any required prison and parole time and (2) meets the qualifications for admission as an elector.

To be qualified for admission as an elector, a person must be a U.S. citizen, a bona fide resident of the town in which he or she applies for admission, and at least age 17 and turning 18 on or before the next regular election. Mentally incompetent people cannot be admitted as electors (CGS 9-12). When registering to vote, a person must sign a form under penalties of perjury swearing that he or she has not been convicted of a disfranchising felony, or if so, has been released from confinement and, if applicable, parole (CGS 9-20).

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