OLR Bill Analysis

HB 5276 (as amended by House "A")*

AN ACT CONCERNING THE CAPITOL SCHOLARSHIP GRANT PROGRAM.

SUMMARY:

This bill eliminates a moratorium for FY 12 and FY 13 on new students receiving financial assistance under the Capitol Scholarship grant program (see BACKGROUND). Under current law, students cannot receive a Capitol Scholarship grant in FY 12 or FY 13 unless they received a grant in FY 11. The bill also eliminates a requirement that grants be proportionately reduced in FY 12 and FY 13 if total program grants exceed the program's budgeted appropriation.

Additionally, the bill appears to make a conforming change to reflect the grant program's current administration by removing a reference to the Board of Regents for Higher Education (BOR). However, the bill replaces this reference to BOR with one to the Office of Higher Education (OHE), which does not currently exist (see BACKGROUND).

*House Amendment “A” removes the reference to BOR and replaces it with one to OHE.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

BACKGROUND

Office of Higher Education

Connecticut does not currently have an Office of Higher Education. HB 5032 (File 562), which passed the House, renames the existing Office of Financial and Academic Affairs for Higher Education (OFAAHE) as the Office of Higher Education. OFAAHE, among other things, administers the Capitol Scholarship grant program.

Capitol Scholarship

Capitol Scholarship grants are available to state residents who have not received a bachelor's degree and have been accepted at a postsecondary school, technical institute, college, or university in Connecticut, or in any other state that allows its students to bring state student financial assistance funds into Connecticut. Grant awards are based on academic performance and financial need. Maximum grants are $ 3,000 per year for those attending in-state institutions and $ 500 per year for those going out-of-state.

COMMITTEE ACTION

Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee

Joint Favorable

Yea

18

Nay

0

(03/13/2012)