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GOVERNMENT, REGIONAL;

OLR Research Report


February 26, 2010

 

2010-R-0072

REGIONAL GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATIONS

By: Ryan F. O'Neil, Research Assistant

Mary M. Janicki, Research Analyst

You asked for information on various regional government organizations in Connecticut, including the types of regional entities and their municipal members, the authorization and purpose for each, and the sources of funding.

This report includes the above information on the following regional entities:

1. community action agencies (12 different agencies);

2. counties (8);

3. local health districts (20);

4. regional education service centers (6);

5. regional planning organizations (15), which include:

a. councils of elected officials (2),

b. councils of governments (8), and

c. regional planning agencies (5);

6. regional school districts (17);

7. resource recovery authorities (3);

8. tourism districts (3);

9. water authorities (3);

10. water utility coordinating committees (4); and

11. workforce development boards (5).

We have included a list of organizations for each type of regional district or entity and their revenue sources where available. Unless otherwise noted, the information reported in the tables was taken from the websites of the various agencies, districts, and organizations.

COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCIES (CAA)

Authorization

CGS 17b-885 – 17b-895, inclusive.

Purpose

A CAA is a network of federally designated public or private nonprofit anti-poverty agencies previously designated by and authorized to accept funds from the federal Community Services Administration under the 1964 Economic Opportunity Act or a successor agency established under CGS 17b-892. Twelve CAAs provide services to Connecticut residents statewide, including:

1. employment and job training,

2. financial literacy and money management,

3. early childhood education and youth development,

4. housing and shelter, and

5. energy assistance.

By law, a CAA's functions are subject to the approval of the commissioner of social services.

Funding

A CAA can:

1. enter into contracts with private and public nonprofit agencies to receive and administer funds,

2. receive and administer funds and contributions from private and local public sources to support community action programs, and

3. receive and administer funds under any federal or state assistance program that allows a nonprofit agency to operate appropriate community action projects.

A CAA, subject to the approval of its governing board, may transfer the funds it receives and delegate powers to other agencies.

Table 1 lists the state's CAAs and the towns in which they are located. Table 2 shows their revenue sources, where available.

Table 1: Community Action Agencies

Action for Bridgeport Community Development

The ACCESS Community Action Agency

Bristol Community Organization

CTE The Community Action Agency Greater Stamford

Community Action Agency of New Haven

Community Action Committee of Danbury

Community Renewal Team

Human Resources Agency of New Britain

Norwalk Economic Opportunity Now

Training, Education And Manpower

New Opportunities

Thames Valley Council for Community Action

Bridgeport

Andover

Plainfield

Bristol

Darien

East Haven

Bethel

Avon

Haddam

New Britain

New Canaan

Ansonia

Barkhamsted

New Hartford

Bozrah

Easton

Ashford

Pomfret

Burlington

Greenwich

Hamden

Bridgewater

Branford

Hartford

 

Norwalk

Beacon Falls

Berlin

Norfolk

Colchester

Fairfield

Bolton

Putnam

Farmington

Stamford

New Haven

Brookfield

Bloomfield

Killingworth

 

Weston

Bethany

Bethlehem

Prospect

East Lyme

Monroe

Brooklyn

Scotland

Plainville

 

North Haven

Canaan

Canton

Madison

 

Westport

Derby

Cheshire

Southbury

Franklin

Strafford

Canterbury

Somers

Plymouth

 

West Haven

Cornwall

Chester

Manchester

 

Wilton

Milford

Colebrook

Southington

Griswold

Trumbull

Chaplin

Stafford

     

Danbury

Clinton

Marlborough

   

Orange

Goshen

Thomaston

Groton

 

Columbia

Sterling

     

Kent

Cromwell

Middlefield

   

Oxford

Hartland

Torrington

Lebanon

 

Coventry

Thompson

     

New Fairfield

Deep River

Middletown

   

Seymour

Harwinton

Wallingford

Ledyard

 

Eastford

Tolland

     

New Milford

Durham

North Branford

   

Shelton

Litchfield

Waterbury

Lisbon

 

Ellington

Union

     

Newtown

East Granby

Newington

   

Woodbridge

Meriden

Watertown

Lyme

 

Hampton

Vernon

     

North Canaan

East Haddam

Old Saybrook

     

Middlebury

Winchester

Montville

 

Hebron

Willington

     

Redding

East Hampton

Portland

     

Morris

Wolcott

New London

 

Killingly

Windham

     

Ridgefield

East Hartford

Rocky Hill

     

Naugatuck

Woodbury

North Stonington

 

Lebanon

Woodstock

     

Roxbury

East Windsor

Simsbury

         

Norwich

 

Mansfield

 

     

Salisbury

Enfield

South Windsor

         

Old Lyme

           

Sharon

Essex

Suffield

         

Preston

           

Sherman

Glastonbury

Westbrook

         

Salem

           

Warren

Granby

West Hartford

         

Sprague

           

Washington

Guilford

Wethersfield

         

Stonington

               

Windsor

         

Voluntown

               

Windsor Locks

         

Waterford

Table 2: Revenue Sources for Community Action Agencies

Community Renewal Team (2009)

 

Human Resources Agency of New Britain (2008)

Source

Amount

 

Source

Amount

Grants and Contracts

 

 

Intergovernmental:

 

Federal

$41,506,045

 

Federal

$11,873,281

State

14,790,165

 

State

3,564,295

Private Weatherization Program

2,168,623

 

Local

808,652

Other Revenue

8,114,697

 

In-kind contributions

971,390

Total

$66,579,530

 

Fees

946,877

     

Total

$18,164,495

FORMER COUNTY GOVERNMENTS

Authorization

Currently, there is no authorization. Repealed by Public Act 152, 1959 and additional, conforming acts enacted in the 1959 and 1961 biennial sessions of the General Assembly.

Purpose

Since 1960, counties in Connecticut exist only as geographical regions, without their own independent government. The duties and functions of the state's eight counties were eliminated by legislation passed in 1959 and 1961. Prior to their elimination, the counties had limited functions. Primarily, they operated jails but also maintained courthouse buildings; inspected weights and measures; resolved disputes over maintenance of roads, highways, and sidewalks; administered certain kinds of trust funds; and contributed financial aid for agricultural extension services, hospitals, and forest fire fighting.

Funding

Currently, there is no authorization. At the time of their abolition, Connecticut's county governments had seven principal revenue sources:

1. an annual levy on towns and cities, called the county tax;

2. a share of the state's unincorporated business tax;

3. liquor manufacturers' and wholesalers' license fees collected by the State Liquor Control Commission;

4. state grants for the boarding of sentenced jail prisoners;

5. town and city payments for jail inmates in adjourned or continued cases;

6. trust funds; and

7. miscellaneous sources such as interest, income from rent or sale of property, and civil defense payments.

Table 3 lists the counties and the towns within them.

Table 3: Counties

Fairfield

Hartford

Litchfield

Middlesex

New Haven

New London

Tolland

Windham

Bethel

Avon

Hartland

Barkhamsted

Norfolk

Chester

Ansonia

New Haven

Bozrah

Andover

Ashford

Bridgeport

Berlin

Manchester

Bethlehem

North Canaan

Clinton

Beacon Falls

North Branford

Colchester

Bolton

Brooklyn

Brookfield

Bloomfield

Marlborough

Bridgewater

Plymouth

Cromwell

Bethany

North Haven

East Lyme

Columbia

Canterbury

Danbury

Bristol

New Britain

Canaan

Roxbury

Deep River

Branford

Orange

Franklin

Coventry

Chaplin

Darien

Burlington

Newington

Colebrook

Salisbury

Durham

Cheshire

Oxford

Griswold

Ellington

Eastford

Easton

Canton

Plainville

Cornwall

Sharon

East Haddam

Derby

Prospect

Groton

Hebron

Hampton

Fairfield

East Granby

Rocky Hill

Goshen

Thomaston

East Hampton

East Haven

Seymour

Lebanon

Mansfield

Killingly

Greenwich

East Hartford

Simsbury

Harwinton

Torrington

Essex

Guilford

Southbury

Ledyard

Somers

Plainfield

Monroe

East Windsor

South Windsor

Kent

Warren

Haddam

Hamden

Wallingford

Lisbon

Stafford

Pomfret

New Canaan

Enfield

Southington

Litchfield

Washington

Killingworth

Madison

Waterbury

Lyme

Tolland

Putnam

New Fairfield

Farmington

Suffield

Morris

Watertown

Middlefield

Meriden

West Haven

Montville

Union

Scotland

Newtown

Glastonbury

West Hartford

New Hartford

Winchester

Middletown

Middlebury

Wolcott

New London

Vernon

Sterling

Norwalk

Granby

Wethersfield

New Milford

Woodbury

Old Saybrook

Milford

Woodbridge

North Stonington

Willington

Thompson

Redding

Hartford

Windsor

   

Portland

Naugatuck

 

Norwich

 

Windham

Ridgefield

 

Windsor Locks

   

Westbrook

   

Old Lyme

 

Woodstock

Shelton

             

Preston

   

Sherman

             

Salem

   

Stamford

             

Sprague

   

Stratford

             

Stonington

   

Trumbull

             

Voluntown

   

Weston

             

Waterford

   

Westport

                   

Wilton

                   

Source: Secretary of the State

LOCAL HEALTH DISTRICTS

Authorization

CGS 19a-241 – 19a-246, inclusive.

Purpose

Each public health district board may adopt reasonable rules and regulations for promoting general health within the district consistent with law and the Public Health Code. Each district has the authority to:

1. sue and be sued;

2. make and execute contracts and other instruments necessary or convenient to the exercise of health district powers;

3. make, amend, and repeal bylaws, rules, and regulations;

4. acquire real estate;

5. provide for the financing of the programs, projects, or other district functions; and

6. exercise other powers as are necessary to properly carry out its duties.

Funding

Health districts are funded by member municipality appropriations of at least $1 per capita from tax receipts, annual state reimbursements, and allotments of state or federal funds.

Tables 4 and 5 list the state's local health districts and their revenue sources, where available.

Table 4: Local Health Districts

Bristol-Burlington

Central Connecticut

Chatham

Chesprocott

Connecticut River Area

East Shore

Bristol

Berlin

East Hampton

Cheshire

Clinton

Branford

Burlington

Newington

East Haddam

Prospect

Deep River

East Haven

 

Rocky Hill

Haddam

Wolcott

Old Saybrook

North Branford

 

Wethersfield

Hebron

     
   

Marlborough

     
   

Portland

     

Eastern Highlands

Farmington Valley

Ledge Light

Naugatuck Valley

Newtown

North Central

Andover

Avon

East Lyme

Ansonia

Bridgewater

East Windsor

Ashford

Barkhamsted

Groton

Beacon Falls

Newtown

Ellington

Bolton

Canton

Ledyard

Derby

Roxbury

Enfield

Chaplin

Colebrook

New London

Naugatuck

 

Stafford

Columbia

East Granby

Waterford

Seymour

 

Suffield

Coventry

Farmington

 

Shelton

 

Vernon

Mansfield

Granby

     

Windham

Scotland

Hartland

     

Windsor Locks

Tolland

New Hartford

       

Willington

Simsbury

       

Northeast

Pomperaug

Quinnipiac Valley

Torrington Area

Trumbull-Monroe

Brooklyn

Oxford

Bethany

Bethlehem

Salisbury

Monroe

Canterbury

Southbury

Hamden

Canaan

Thomaston

Trumbull

Eastford

Woodbury

North Haven

Cornwall

Torrington

 

Hampton

 

Woodbridge

Goshen

Warren

 

Killingly

   

Harwinton

Watertown

 

Plainfield

   

Kent

Winchester

 

Pomfret

   

Litchfield

   

Putnam

   

Morris

   

Sterling

   

Norfolk

   

Thompson

   

North Canaan

   

Woodstock

   

Plymouth

   

Uncas

West Hartford-Bloomfield

Weston-Westport

     

Bozrah

Bloomfield

Weston

     

Montville

West Hartford

Westport

     

Norwich

         

Sprague

         

Table 5: Revenue Sources for Central Connecticut and Eastern Highlands Local Health Districts

Central Connecticut Health District

(2009)

 

Eastern Highlands Health District (2010 estimates)

Source

Amount

 

Source

Amount

Town of Berlin Assessment

$81,759

 

Member Town Contributions

$361,620

Town of Newington Assessment

120,119

 

State Grant-in-Aid

170,930

Town of Rocky Hill Assessment

76,470

 

Services Fees

188,890

Town of Wethersfield Assessment

105,791

 

Total

$721,440

State Per Capita Grant

197,569

     

State Lead Grant

0

     

Preventative Health & Health Services Block Grant

14,273

     

Public Health Preparedness Grant

63,439

     

Other Grants (Asthma, Dental, Smart Dining)

37,210

     

Permits and Fees

104,665

     

Interest Income

18,000

     

Program Income

1,700

     

Flu/Pneumonia Income

54,000

     

Fund Balance Transfer (to) / from

81,795

     

Total

$956,790

     

REGIONAL EDUCATION SERVICE CENTERS (RESC)

Authorization

CGS 10-66a et seq.

Purpose

RESCs provide educational services and programs to boards of education so the boards do not have to provide them individually. Among the services RESCs currently provide are certain special education services, teacher and school employee fingerprinting and background checks, and administrative and transportation services for the interdistrict public school attendance program (Open Choice). Some RESCs also operate interdistrict magnet schools. RESCs must be run by boards of directors made up of at least one member representing and designated by each participating board of education.

State law allows a RESC to be established in any of the 15 OPM-designated state planning regions. A minimum of four local boards of education in a region may form a RESC by submitting a plan of organization and operation to the State Board of Education for its approval. The law generally allows only one RESC to be established in each planning region. But if a region has more than 50,000 students, the law allows two RESCs. Regardless of the number of RESCs in a region, each board of education can be a member of only one RESC.

Tables 6 and 7 list the state's RESCs and their revenue sources, where available.

Table 6: Regional Education Support Centers

Area Cooperative Educational Services

Cooperative Educational Services

Capitol Region Education Council

EASTCONN

Education Connection

LEARN

Ansonia

Bridgeport

Avon

Andover

Barkhamsted

Clinton

Bethany

Darien

Berlin

Ashford

Bethel

East Haddam

Branford

Fairfield

Bloomfield

Bozrah

Brookfield

East Hampton

Cheshire

Greenwich

Bolton

Brooklyn

Canaan

East Lyme

Derby

Monroe

Bristol

Canterbury

Colebrook

Groton

East Haven

New Canaan

Burlington

Chaplin

Cornwall

Guilford

Hamden

Norwalk

Canton

Colchester

Danbury

Ledyard

Meriden

Ridgefield

Cromwell

Columbia

Kent

Madison

Milford

Stamford

East Granby

Coventry

Litchfield

Montville

Naugatuck

Stratford

East Hartford

Eastford

New Fairfield

New London

New Haven

Trumbull

East Windsor

Griswold

New Milford

No. Stonington

North Branford

Weston

Ellington

Hampton

Newtown

Norwich

North Haven

Westport

Enfield

Hebron

Norfolk

Old Saybrook

Orange

Wilton

Farmington

Killingly

N. Canaan

Preston

Oxford

 

Glastonbury

Lebanon

Plymouth

Region 4

Region 5

 

Granby

Mansfield

Redding

Region 17

Region 13

 

Hartford

Marlborough

Region 1

Region 18

Region 16

 

Hartland

Plainfield

Region 6

Salem

Seymour

 

Harwinton

Pomfret

Region 7

Stonington

Shelton

 

Manchester

Putnam

Region 12

Waterford

Wallingford

 

New Britain

Region 8

Region 14

Westbrook

Waterbury

 

New Hartford

Region 11

Region 15

 

Wolcott

 

Newington

Scotland

Salisbury

 

Woodbridge

 

Plainville

Sprague

Sharon

 

West Haven

 

Portland

Stafford

Sherman

 

 

 

Rocky Hill

Sterling

Thomaston

 

 

 

Simsbury

Thompson

Torrington

 

 

 

Somers

Union

Watertown

 

 

 

South Windsor

Voluntown

Winsted

 

 

 

Suffield

Willington

 

 

 

 

Vernon

Windham

 

 

 

 

West Hartford

Woodstock

 

 

 

 

Wethersfield

 

 

 

 

 

Windsor

 

 

 

 

 

Windsor Locks

 

 

 

Table 7: Revenue Sources for Regional Educational Support Centers

Cooperative Educational Services

Capitol Region Education Council

EASTCONN

Education Connection

LEARN

Source

Amount

Source

Amount

Source

Amount

Source

Amount

Source

Amount

School Readiness

$650,124

State Grants

$57,224,861

Local Fee-for-Service Funds

$19,484,839

Local

$10,234,636

Federal

$2,891,142

Administration

2,800,419

Member Board of Education

36,930,427

Competitive Grant Funds

19,095,142

State Grants

7,363,308

State Direct

213,283

Facilities

4,398,611

Other Agencies

54,659,893

RESC Unrestricted Formula Grant

389,697

Federal Grants

2,427,141

State Grant

15,117,946

Professional Development

1,589,021

Federal Grants

655,450

Total

$38,969,678

Federal via State

911,337

Local

9,707,480

Special Education

19,700,478

Total

$149,470,631

 

 

Total

$20,936,422

Private Funds

252,320

Transportation

1,724,969

 

 

       

Total

$28,182,171

Special Revenue Funds

3,870,229

 

             

Interdistrict Magnet Schools and School Choice

9,088,715

 

             

Total

$43,822,566

 

             

REGIONAL PLANNING ORGANIZATIONS

The Office of Policy and Management (OPM) must designate local planning regions within the state (CGS 16a-4a (4)). It has assigned towns to each of 15 designated planning regions, which include every town but Stafford.

Through local ordinance, the municipalities within each of these planning regions have voluntarily created one of the three types of regional planning organizations allowed under Connecticut law to carry out a variety of regional planning and other activities on their behalf: (1) council of elected officials (CEO), (2) council of governments (COG), or (3) regional planning agency (RPA).

Detailed descriptions of each sub-category of planning organization follow.

Councils of elected officials

Authorization. CGS 4-124c – 4-124h, inclusive and ordinances adopted by the municipal members' legislative bodies.

Purpose. A regional council of elected officials is one of three types of regional planning organizations (the others being regional councils of governments and regional planning agencies). CEOs were authorized in 1965 and have all the powers of a regional planning agency or a council of governments if no such entity exists in the region. They are also authorized to consider public matters common to two or more member municipalities (such as transportation, health, safety, welfare, education, and economic conditions of the area); promote cooperative arrangements and coordinate activity among member towns; and make recommendations to member towns and other public agencies.

Funding. CEOs may receive funds from any source, including the state and federal governments, and bequests, gifts, or contributions from any individual, corporation, or association. Any town, city, or borough participating in a CEO must appropriate funds each year to carry out the council's purposes. The funds must be appropriated and paid in accordance with a dues formula established by the council.

Tables 3 and 4 list the state's CEOs and their revenue source, where available.

Table 8: Housatonic Valley and Litchfield Hills Council of Elected Officials

Housatonic Valley

Litchfield Hills

Bethel

Barkhamsted

Bridgewater

Colebrook

Brookfield

Goshen

Danbury

Hartland

New Fairfield

Harwinton

New Milford

Litchfield

Newtown

Morris

Redding

New Hartford

Ridgefield

Norfolk

Sherman

Torrington

 

Winchester

Source: Secretary of the State's website

Table 9: Revenue Sources for Litchfield Hills Council of Elected Officials (2009)

Source

Amount

State Grant-in-Aid

$0

ConnDOT Grant

83,250

Municipal Dues

55,276

DEMHS Grant

15,000

Other Grants

26,000

Reserve Fund

36,905

Total

$216,431

Councils of governments

Authorization. CGS 4-124i – 4-124r, inclusive and ordinances adopted by the municipal members' legislative bodies.

Purpose. A council of government is one of three types of regional planning organizations (the others being councils of elected officials and regional planning agencies). Authorized in 1971 as a type of regional planning organization structure, COGs replace CEOs or a regional planning agencies in an OPM-defined planning region. COGs carry out the planning duties and responsibilities for the region. This includes preparing the required plan of development and reviewing certain zoning and subdivision matters.

Funding. COGs may receive funds from any source, including the state and federal governments, and bequests, gifts, or contributions from any individual, corporation, or association. Any town, city, or borough participating in a COG must appropriate funds each year for the council to perform its purposes. The funds must be appropriated and paid in accordance with a dues formula established by the council.

Tables 10 and 11 list state's COGs and their revenue source, where available.

Table 10: Councils of Government

Capitol Planning

Central Naugatuck Valley

Northeastern Connecticut

Northwestern Connecticut

South Central

Southeastern Connecticut

Windham

Valley

Andover

Manchester

Beacon Falls

Brooklyn

Canaan

Bethany

Bozrah

Ashford

Ansonia

Avon

Marlborough

Bethlehem

Canterbury

Cornwall

Branford

Colchester

Chaplin

Derby

Bloomfield

Newington

Cheshire

Eastford

Kent

East Haven

East Lyme

Columbia

Seymour

Bolton

Rocky Hill

Middlebury

Killingly

North Canaan

Guilford

Franklin

Coventry

Shelton

Canton

Simsbury

Naugatuck

Plainfield

Roxbury

Hamden

Griswold

Hampton

 

East Granby

Somers

Oxford

Pomfret

Salisbury

Madison

Groton

Lebanon

 

East Hartford

South Windsor

Prospect

Putnam

Sharon

Meriden

Ledyard

Mansfield

 

East Windsor

Suffield

Southbury

Sterling

Warren

Milford

Lisbon

Scotland

 

Ellington

Tolland

Thomaston

Thompson

Washington

New Haven

Montville

Willington

 

Enfield

Vernon

Waterbury

Union

 

N. Branford

New London

Windham

 

Farmington

West Hartford

Watertown

Woodstock

 

North Haven

N. Stonington

 

 

Glastonbury

Wethersfield

Wolcott

   

Orange

Norwich

   

Granby

Windsor

Woodbury

   

Wallingford

Preston

   

Hartford

Windsor Locks

     

West Haven

Salem

   

Hebron

       

Woodbridge

Sprague

   
         

 

Stonington

   

Source: Secretary of the State

   

 

Voluntown

 

 

Table 11: Revenue Sources for Capital and Central Naugatuck Councils of Government

Capital (2009)

 

Central Naugatuck Valley (2008)

Source

Amount

 

Source

Amount

Local

$515,455

 

Federal

$9,430,649

Contract/fee for service

508,515

 

State

154,528

Federal

1,418,360

 

Other Government Agencies (towns)

195,174

State

217,885

 

Misc.

12,206

Total

$2,660,215

 

Total

$9,792,557

Regional planning agencies (RPA)

Authorization. CGS 16a-4a; 8-31a – 8-37a, inclusive; and ordinances adopted by the municipal members' legislative bodies.

Purpose. Each RPA must prepare a plan of conservation and development for its area (regarding land use, housing, highways, parks, schools, etc.) at least once every 10 years and revise it at least every three years. The adoption and review process for such plans includes developing recommendations for an original plan or amendments to an existing plan; holding public hearings; addressing voting requirements; and distributing the plan, part, or amendment to the member municipalities and OPM. An RPA also assists public and private agencies in developing and complying with any of its plans. It is authorized to provide administrative, management, technical, or planning assistance to municipalities or other public agencies within its region.

RPAs may also study and recommend to member towns the most efficient and economical way to develop and operate facilities and services.

Funding. RPAs may receive funds from any source, including the state and federal governments, and bequests, gifts, or contributions made by any individual, corporation, or association. Any town, city or borough participating in a regional planning agency must appropriate funds each year for the RPA to perform its purposes. The funds must be appropriated and paid in accordance with a dues formula established by the RPA.

Tables 12 and 13 list the state's RPAs and their revenue sources, where available.

Table 12: Regional Planning Agencies

Central Connecticut

Connecticut River Estuary

Greater Bridgeport

Midstate

Southwestern

Berlin

Chester

Bridgeport

Cromwell

Darien

Bristol

Clinton

Easton

Durham

Greenwich

Burlington

Deep River

Fairfield

East Haddam

New Canaan

New Britain

Essex

Monroe

East Hampton

Norwalk

Plainville

Killingworth

Stratford

Haddam

Stamford

Plymouth

Lyme

Trumbull

Middlefield

Weston

Southington

Old Lyme

 

Middletown

Westport

 

Old Saybrook

 

Portland

Wilton

 

Westbrook

 

 

 

Table 13: Revenue Sources of Regional Planning Agencies

Central Connecticut (2008)

 

Connecticut River Estuary (2009)

 

Greater Bridgeport (2009)

Source

Amount

 

Source

Amount

 

Source

Amount

State

$561,349

 

Investment/Miscellaneous

$4,500

 

Transportation Planning

$727,231

ADA Paratransit Service

921,216

 

State Grant in Aid

68,000

 

State Grant-In-Aid

12,339

Member Municipalities

88,000

 

Town Dues

124,200

 

Local

80,215

Municipalities (Capital Region Purchasing Council) Dues

3,500

 

Town Services

20,000

 

Total

$819,785

Municipalities (Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy) Dues

5,805

 

Domestic Preparedness

0

 

   

Other

7,977

 

Recycling/HHW Ops

76,732

 

 

 

Total

$1,587,847

 

Gateway Commission

53,000

 

   
     

Transportation

240,508

 

   
     

Other Grants

3,000

 

   
     

Total

$589,940

 

   

REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS

Authorization

CGS 10-39 et seq.

Purpose

Towns may vote to approve an agreement establishing a regional school district to share a common board of education. The procedure involves several steps, including the establishment of a temporary regional study committee, funding the study, reporting committee's findings and recommendations, review and approval from the State Board of Education, and simultaneous referenda in each participating town.

(State law also allows boards of education to form more informal cooperative arrangements that require less of a commitment in order to provide a particular function, service, or activity, such as, a specialized teacher or sports team.)

Funding

Sources include member towns' local property taxes and their Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grants and state and federal categorical grants (for programs including special education, transportation, breakfast, health services, school readiness, and early reading).

Tables 14 and 15 list the state's regional school districts and their revenue sources, where available.

Table 14: Regional School Districts

Region 1

Region 4

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 8

Canaan

Chester

Bethany

Goshen

Barkhamsted

Andover

Cornwall

Deep River

Orange

Morris

Colebrook

Hebron

Kent

Essex

Woodbridge

Warren

New Hartford

Marlborough

North Canaan

     

Norfolk

 

Salisbury

         

Sharon

         
           

Region 9

Region 10

Region 11

Region 12

Region 13

Region 14

Easton

Burlington

Chaplin

Bridgewater

Durham

Bethlehem

Redding

Harwinton

Hampton

Roxbury

Middlefield

Woodbury

   

Scotland

 

Washington

 
           

Region 15

Region 16

Region 17

Region 18

Region 19

 

Middlebury

Beacon Falls

Haddam

Lyme

Ashford

 

Southbury

Prospect

Killingworth

Old Lyme

Mansfield

 
       

Willington

 

Note: There is no Regional School District 2 or 3.

Table 15: Revenue Sources for Regional School Districts (2009 unless otherwise noted)

Region 14

Region 15

Region 16

Region 18 (est. 09-10)

Region 19

Source

Amount

Source

Amount

Source

Amount

Source

Amount

Source

Amount

Miscellaneous

$1,831,610

Total from towns

$57,897,060

Beacon Falls ECS Grant

$4,044,804

Classroom rental

$1,974

Transportation Grant

$280,500

State Grants

645,906

Investment

75,000

Beacon Falls Taxes

8,611,143

Earned on Interest Bearing Accounts

29,603

Agriculture Education Grant

447,550

State Building Grants

547,046

Special Education tuition

35,000

Prospect ECS Grant

5,319,201

ECS/Consolidated Grant

751,142

Agriculture Education Tuition

139,050

Total ECS Grant

2,194,189

Blind tuition

20,000

Prospect Taxes

14,140,840

Transportation

0

Special Education Tuition

60,000

Total

$5,218,751

Miscellaneous income

10,000

Use of School Collected Fees

23,500

Federal grants

355,955

Interest, Other income

20,000

   

Income from surplus

50,000

State reimbursement for construction

2,447,044

Total

$1,138,674

Member Town Contributions

17,366,670

   

Total local sources

190,000

Carry over

600,000

   

Total

$18,313,770

   

Transportation grant

250,000

State Grants

704,453

       
   

Adult education grant

0

Interest Income

50,000

       
   

Total state sources

250,000

Total

$35,940,985

       
   

Total

$58,980,865

           

RESOURCE RECOVERY AUTHORITIES

Authorization

CGS 7-273aa – 7-273oo, inclusive.

Purpose

Resource recovery authorities are established by the charter or ordinance of member municipalities to develop and maintain comprehensive waste management and recycling programs.

Funding

Revenue sources include (1) user fees for municipal solid waste tipped at an authority-sponsored transfer station, (2) administrative fees for processing recyclables, (3) hauler permit fees, and (4) grants.

Tables 16 and 17 list the state's resource recovery authorities and their revenue sources, where available.

Table 16: Resource Recovery Authorities

Housatonic Resources Recovery Authority (HRRA)

Southeastern Conn. Regional Resources Recovery Authority (SCRRRA)

Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA)

Bethel

Griswold

Avon

Granby

Old Saybrook

Bridgewater

Groton

Barkhamsted

Greenwich

Orange

Brookfield

Ledyard

Beacon Falls

Griswold

Oxford

Danbury

Montville

Bethany

Groton

Portland

Kent

New London

Bethlehem

Guilford

Preston

New Fairfield

North Stonington

Bloomfield

Haddam

Rocky Hill

New Milford

Norwich

Bolton

Hamden

Roxbury

Newtown

Preston

Bozrah

Hartford

Salem

Redding

Sprague

Bridgeport

Harwinton

Salisbury

Ridgefield

Stonington

Canaan

Hebron

Sharon

Sherman

Waterford

Canton

Killingworth

Shelton

   

Cheshire

Ledyard

Simsbury

   

Chester

Litchfield

South Windsor

   

Clinton

Lyme

Southbury

   

Colebrook

Madison

Sprague

   

Cornwall

Manchester

Stonington

   

Coventry

Marlborough

Stratford

   

Cromwell

Meriden

Suffield

   

Deep River

Middlebury

Thomaston

   

Durham

Middlefield

Tolland

   

East Granby

Milford

Torrington

   

East Hampton

Monroe

Trumbull

   

East Hartford

Montville

Vernon

   

East Haven

Naugatuck

Wallingford

   

East Lyme

New Hartford

Waterbury

   

East Windsor

New London

Waterford

   

Easton

Newington

Watertown

   

Ellington

Norfolk

West Hartford

   

Enfield

North Branford

Westbrook

   

Essex

North Canaan

Westport

   

Fairfield

North Haven

Wethersfield

   

Farmington

North Stonington

Winchester

   

Glastonbury

Norwich

Windsor Locks

   

Goshen

Old Lyme

Woodbridge

 

 

Woodbury

Table 17: Revenue Sources for Resource Recovery Authorities (2009)

Housatonic Resources Recovery Authority (HRRA)

 

Connecticut Resources Recovery Authority (CRRA)

Source

Amount

 

Source

Amount

Charges for services - User fees

$304,526

 

Service Charges

 

Intergovernmental

89,925

 

Members

$77,236,000

Investment earnings

3,548

 

Others

26,838,000

Miscellaneous

14,300

 

Energy Sales

54,568,000

Total

$412,299

 

Ash Disposal

2,511,000

     

Other Operating Revenue

10,550,000

     

Total

$171,703,000

TOURISM DISTRICTS

Authorization

CGS 10-397

Purpose

The state's three regional tourism districts must promote and market the districts as regional leisure and business traveler destinations to stimulate economic growth.

Funding

In addition to receiving state appropriations through the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism, each regional tourism district may accept and must solicit private funds for the promotion of tourism within its towns and cities. They can also coordinate activities with any private nonprofit tourist association within the district and the state that promotes tourism industry businesses in this state.

Table 18 lists the state's tourism districts and the towns within them.

Table 18: Tourism Districts

Eastern

Central

Ashford

Killingly

Putnam

Andover

Essex

Old Saybrook

Bozrah

Lebanon

Salem

Avon

Farmington

Orange

Brooklyn

Ledyard

Scotland

Berlin

Glastonbury

Plainville

Canterbury

Lisbon

Sprague

Bethany

Granby

Portland

Chaplin

Lyme

Sterling

Bloomfield

Guilford

Rocky Hill

Colchester

Mansfield

Stonington

Bolton

Haddam

Simsbury

Columbia

Montville

Thompson

Branford

Hamden

Somers

Coventry

New London

Union

Canton

Hartford

South Windsor

East Lyme

North Stonington

Voluntown

Cheshire

Hebron

Southington

Eastford

Norwich

Waterford

Chester

Killingworth

Stafford

Franklin

Old Lyme

Willington

Clinton

Madison

Suffield

Griswold

Plainfield

Windham

Cromwell

Manchester

Tolland

Groton

Pomfret

Woodstock

Deep River

Marlborough

Vernon

Hampton

Preston

 

Durham

Meriden

Wallingford

     

East Granby

Middlefield

West Hartford

     

East Haddam

Middletown

West Haven

     

East Hampton

Milford

Westbrook

     

East Hartford

New Britain

Wethersfield

     

East Haven

New Haven

Windsor

     

East Windsor

Newington

Windsor Locks

     

Ellington

North Branford

Woodbridge

     

Enfield

North Haven

 

Western

Ansonia

Colebrook

Kent

Norfolk

Sherman

Weston

Barkhamsted

Cornwall

Litchfield

Oxford

Southbury

Westport

Beacon Falls

Danbury

Middlebury

Plymouth

Stamford

Wilton

Bethel

Darien

Monroe

Prospect

Stratford

Winchester

Bethlehem

Derby

Morris

Redding

Thomaston

Wolcott

Bridgeport

Easton

Naugatuck

Ridgefield

Torrington

Woodbury

Bridgewater

Fairfield

New Canaan

Roxbury

Trumbull

 

Bristol

Goshen

New Fairfield

Salisbury

Warren

 

Brookfield

Greenwich

New Hartford

Seymour

Washington

 

Burlington

Hartland

New Milford

Sharon

Waterbury

 

Canaan

Harwinton

Newtown

Shelton

Watertown

 

Source: Secretary of the State

WATER AUTHORITIES

Authorization

There are three water authorities in the state.

The Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) was authorized by No. 511 of the 1929 Special Acts, as amended from time to time

The South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority was authorized by Special Act 77-98, as amended from time to time.

The Southeastern Connecticut Water Authority was authorized by No. 381 of the 1967 Special Acts, as amended from time to time.

Purpose

MDC is chartered by the state to provide potable water and sewerage services on a regional basis.

The South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority and Southeastern Connecticut Water Authority were also created by special acts primarily to provide an adequate supply of pure water and safe of wastewater disposal at a reasonable cost within each district.

The two authorities also are permitted to:

1. serve other areas that may be served under cooperative agreements and authorized acquisitions and

2. advance water conservation and the conservation and compatible recreational use of land held by each authority.

Funding

Funding sources include fees for water use by residential and business customers. MDC also collects revenue for sewer usage.

Tables 19 and 20 list the state's water authorities and their revenue sources, where available.

Table 19: Water Authorities

South Central Regional Water Authority

Southeastern Connecticut Water Authority

Metropolitan District Commission

Ansonia

Ledyard

Bloomfield

Beacon Falls

Montville

East Hartford

Bethany

North Stonington

Hartford

Branford

Stonington

Newington

Cheshire

 

Rocky Hill

Derby

 

West Hartford

East Haven

 

Wethersfield

Guilford

 

Windsor

Hamden

   

Killingworth

   

Madison

   

Milford

   

New Haven

   

North Branford

   

North Haven

   

Orange

   

Prospect

   

Seymour

   

West Haven

   

Woodbridge

   

Table 20: Revenue Sources for Water Authorities

South Central Regional Water Authority (2009)

 

Metropolitan District Commission (2008)

Source

Amount

 

Source

Amount

Water

$72,093,000

 

Water services

$56,753,810

Other

9,253,000

 

Taxation - member towns

32,670,177

Total

$81,346,000

 

Assessments

1,387,523

 

 

 

Sewer user fees

10,837,597

     

Intergovernmental revenue

16,657,569

     

Investment income

890,911

     

Other local revenue

2,967,692

     

Total

$122,165,279

WATER UTILITY COORDINATING COMMITTEES

Authorization

CGS 25-33e – 25-33j, inclusive

Purpose

The commissioner of public health must delineate the boundaries for public water supply management areas and establish a water utility coordinating committee for each. The committees must develop a preliminary assessment of water supply conditions and problems within each management area and prepare a coordinated water system plan. The plan promotes cooperation among public water systems.

Table 21 lists the state's water utility coordinating committees and the towns within them.

Table 21: Water Utility Coordinating Committees

Upper Connecticut River

Southeastern Connecticut

South Central

Housatonic

Avon

Bozrah

Ansonia

Bethel

Barkhamstead

Colchester

Beacon Falls

Bridgewater

Berlin

East Haddam

Bethany

Brookfield

Bloomfield

East Hampton

Branford

Danbury

Bristol

East Lyme

Cheshire

New Fairfield

Burlington

Franklin

Chester

New Milford

Colebrook

Griswold

Clinton

Newtown

East Granby

Groton

Cromwell

Ridgefield

East Hartford

Hebron

Deep River

Roxbury

East Windsor

Lebanon

Derby

Sherman

Ellington

Ledyard

Durham

Southbury

Enfield

Lisbon

East Haven

Woodbury

Farmington

Lyme

Essex

 

Glastonbury

Montville

Guilford

 

Granby

North Stonington

Haddam

 

Hartford

Norwich

Hamden

 

Hartland

Old Lyme

Killingworth

 

Harwinton

Preston

Madison

 

Manchester

Salem

Meriden

 

New Britain

Sprague

Middlefield

 

New Hartford

Stonington

Middletown

 

Rocky Hill

Voluntown

Milford

 

Simsbury

Waterford

Naugatuck

 

Somers

 

New Haven

 

South Windsor

 

North Branford

 

Southington

 

North Haven

 

Suffield

 

Old Saybrook

 

Vernon

 

Orange

 

West Hartford

 

Oxford

 

Windsor

 

Portland

 

Windsor Locks

 

Prospect

 
   

Seymour

 
   

Wallingford

 
   

West Haven

 
   

Westbrook

 
   

Woodbridge

 

Source: Department Of Public Health

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT BOARDS

Authorization

CGS 31-3j to 31-3r, inclusive

Purpose

In 1992, the General Assembly established regional workforce development boards to replace the private industry councils that monitored job training programs under the federal Job Training Partnership Act. The boards assess regional needs, develop plans, select program providers, oversee programs, negotiate performance measures, and promote private sector involvement within the region.

Funding

Federal Workforce Investment Act funds are distributed through the state Department of Labor to the five regional boards.

Table 22 lists the state's workforce development boards and the towns within them.

Table 22: Workforce Development Boards

Capital Workforce Partners

Northwest Regional Workforce Investment Board

Workforce Alliance

The Workplace

Eastern Connecticut Workforce Investment Board

Andover

New Britain

Barkhamsted

New Hartford

Bethany

Madison

Ansonia

Ashford

Montville

Avon

Newington

Bethlehem

Naugatuck

Branford

Meriden

Beacon Falls

Bozrah

New London

Berlin

Plainville

Bethel

Norfolk

Chester

Middlefield

Bridgeport

Brooklyn

North Stonington

Bloomfield

Plymouth

Bridgewater

North Canaan

Clinton

Middletown

Darien

Canterbury

Norwich

Bolton

Rocky Hill

Brookfield

Prospect

Cromwell

Milford

Derby

Chaplin

Old Lyme

Bristol

Simsbury

Canaan

Redding

Deep River

New Haven

Easton

Colchester

Plainfield

Burlington

Somers

Cheshire

Ridgefield

Durham

North Branford

Fairfield

Columbia

Pomfret

Canton

South Windsor

Colebrook

Roxbury

East Haddam

North Haven

Greenwich

Coventry

Preston

East Granby

Southington

Cornwall

Salisbury

East Hampton

Old Saybrook

Monroe

East Lyme

Putnam

East Hartford

Stafford

Danbury

Sharon

East Haven

Orange

New Canaan

Eastford

Salem

East Windsor

Suffield

Goshen

Sherman

Essex

Portland

Norwalk

Franklin

Scotland

Ellington

Tolland

Hartland

Southbury

Guilford

Wallingford

Oxford

Griswold

Sprague

Enfield

Vernon

Harwinton

Thomaston

Haddam

West Haven

Seymour

Groton

Sterling

Farmington

West Hartford

Kent

Torrington

Hamden

Westbrook

Shelton

Hampton

Stonington

Glastonbury

Wethersfield

Litchfield

Warren

Killingworth

Woodbridge

Stamford

Killingly

Thompson

Granby

Windsor

Middlebury

Washington

 

 

Stratford

Lebanon

Union

Hartford

Windsor Locks

Morris

Waterbury

 

 

Trumbull

Ledyard

Voluntown

Hebron

 

Newtown

Watertown

 

 

Weston

Lisbon

Waterford

Manchester

 

New Fairfield

Winchester

 

 

Westport

Lyme

Willington

Marlborough

 

New Milford

Winsted

 

 

Wilton

Mansfield

Windham

     

Wolcott

       

Woodstock

     

Woodbury

         

RO:df