Topic:
FELONIES; SENTENCING; CRIMINAL LAW; PRISONS AND PRISONERS; STATISTICAL INFORMATION; CRIME; CRIMINALS; MISDEMEANOR;
Location:
CRIMINAL LAW; SENTENCING;

OLR Research Report


January 6, 2006

 

2006-R-0033

CRIMINAL OFFENSES

By: George Coppolo, Chief Attorney

Ryan O'Neil, Research Assistant

You asked us to identify all offenses in the General Statutes that could result in a prison sentence.

SUMMARY

Based on information provided to us by Greg Pac, a case flow statistician for the Judicial Department, we identified 1,629 offenses in the General Statutes that could result in imprisonment. The information Pac provided is from a data base of offenses the Judicial Department maintains.

The department database often divides a criminal statute into separate crimes. For example, CGS 53a-59 establishes the crime of assault in the first degree. But the statute specifies several ways the offense may be committed and it imposes a mandatory minimum sentence if the victim is under 10 years old or a witness. The Judicial Department data base counts each of these ways as different crimes and also counts it as a separate crime if the victim is under 10 years old or a witness. Thus, there are more crimes than statutes that establish the crimes, especially in the penal code.

Of these 1,629 offenses contained on the department's data base, 383 were in the Penal Code (Title 53a) and 1,246 were not. Table 1 shows the number of offenses for each category of maximum sentence that we found.

Table 1: Maximum Sentences for All Crimes

Number of Offenses

Maximum Sentence

3

7 days

5

10 days

179

1 month/30 days

57

2 months/60 days

137

3 months/90 days

2

4 months

1

5 months

227

6 months/180 days

413

1 year/12 months/365 days

1

18 months

62

2 years

22

3 year

287

5 years

2

6 years

4

7 years

108

10 years

6

15 years

82

20 years

14

25 years

4

30 years

1

40 years

3

60 years

9

Life imprisonment/capital punishment

Table 2 shows the number of offenses for each category of maximum sentence that we found, excluding the offenses found in the penal code.

Table 2: Maximum Sentences for Offenses Not in the Penal Code

Number of offenses

Length

3

7 days

5

10 days

179

1 month/30 days

57

2 months/60 days

118

3 months/90 days

2

4 months

1

5 months

203

6 months/180 days

325

1 year/12 months/365 days

1

18 months

61

2 years

21

3 year

180

5 years

2

6 years

4

7 years

51

10 years

6

15 years

21

20 years

2

25 years

4

30 years

Table 3 provides a breakdown of offenses by classification and by its location in or outside of the penal code.

Table 3: Classification and Location of Offenses

Classification

Total Offenses

Penal Code

Non-Penal Code

Class A felony

24

24

0

Class B felony

80

62

18

Class C felony

77

62

15

Class D felony

165

106

59

Unclassified felony

258

3

255

Class A misdemeanor

175

88

87

Class B misdemeanor

48

24

24

Class C misdemeanor

50

19

31

Unclassified misdemeanor

273

131

142

CRIMINAL OFFENSES

Attachment 1 specifies the offenses that carry a prison term as a possible penalty. The table specifies the statutory citation, the type and classification of the offense, a brief description of the offense, and the possible minimum and maximum prison sentence. It is organized by citation starting from the lowest statutory citation to the highest. The type of offense indicates whether it is a felony(F) or misdemeanor(M). The classification indicates whether it is a class A, B, C, or D felony, a class A, B, or C misdemeanor, or an unclassified felony or misdemeanor(U). Attachment 2 provides the same information as Attachment 1 organized from lowest to highest maximum prison sentence. Attachment 3 provides the same information as Attachment 2 except it excludes penal code offenses.

GC:ro