HOUSING (GENERAL); ELDERLY; ASSISTED LIVING;

ASSISTED LIVING;

Connecticut laws/regulations;

OLR Research Report


September 8, 2003

 

2003-R-0637

STATE-FUNDED ASSISTED LIVING PROGRAMS STATUS

By: Helga Niesz, Principal Analyst

You asked about the status of (1) the five-site 300-unit moderate- and low-income assisted living demonstration program, (2) assisted living in state-funded elderly congregate housing, (3) state-funded assisted living in federally funded senior housing, and (4) the private assisted living demonstration program. Assisted living is an emerging long-term care model that provides health care and other assistance to people in various types of elderly housing who may not need or want nursing home care, yet need some help with activities of daily living, such as dressing, walking, eating, bathing, errands, and chores. Below each of your questions are answered in the order asked.

300-UNIT MODERATE AND LOW-INCOME ASSISTED LIVING DEMONSTRATION

Construction has begun on the Retreat in Hartford and Herbert T. Clarke House in Glastonbury, two of the five chosen sites, and they are projected to be open in the second half of 2004. The other three sites are still in the process of obtaining various approvals needed before construction can begin; these are Marian Glen in New Britain, Luther Ridge in Middletown, and Smith Street Assisted Living in Seymour.

Legislation enacted in 1998 and 1999 (1) directed the Department of Social Services (DSS), the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD), and the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority to establish an assisted living demonstration program for moderate- and lower-income seniors and (2) authorized construction of up to 300 units of state-subsidized affordable housing for the program. Applicants must be at least 65 years old, at risk of being placed in a nursing home, and eligible for DSS’ Connecticut Home Care Program for Elders (CHCPE) (PA 98-239, PA 99-279; CGS 17b-347e).

STATE-FUNDED ELDERLY CONGREGATE HOUSING

Sixteen of the state’s 24 state-funded elderly congregate housing projects are now offering assisted living services. These are Augustana Homes in Bethel, D. J. Komanetsky Estates in Bristol, Herbert T. Clark House in Glastonbury, Mystic River Homes in Noank, Mount Carmel in Hamden, Bacon Congregate in Hartford, Luther Manor in Middletown, Ella B. Scantlebury in New Haven, Ludlow Commons in South Norwalk, The Marvin in Norwalk, St. Jude Common in Norwich, Silverbrook Estates in Orange, Seely-Brown Village in Pomfret, Prospect Ridge in Ridgefield, Virginia Connolly in Sumsbury, and F. J. Pitkat Congregate in Rockville. The program has served 277 people from its beginning in May 2001 up to July 2003.

A congregate housing complex contains separate living units for frail elderly residents, but also provides some housekeeping, personal care, and transportation services and usually at least one meal a day in a common dining room. Legislation in 2000 allows all state-assisted congregate housing projects to offer additional, more extensive assisted living services and permits the CHCPE program to pay for them for those who qualify financially. DECD pays for services for some seniors who do not qualify for CHCPE. The services must be provided through assisted living services agencies (ALSAs) (PA 00-2, June Special Session, CGS 8-119m, 17b-342(c)).

STATE ASSISTED LIVING DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM IN FEDERALLY FUNDED ELDERLY HOUSING

Legislation in 2000 and 2001 required the DECD commissioner to establish a demonstration program in up to four federal elderly housing developments to provide assisted living services. Three are already operational: Tower 1/Tower East in New Haven, Immanuel House in Hartford, and Juniper Hill in Mansfield. There are no current plans for a fourth project. The program has served 132 people from its beginning in May 2001 up to July 2003 (PA 00-2, June Special Session, PA 01-2, June Special Session, CGS 8-206e(d)).

PRIVATE ASSISTED LIVING PILOT LEGISLATION

Two new pilot programs pay for assisted living services (but not room and board) for some seniors in private assisted living facilities if they are in danger of running out of money to pay for their care and their assets and income qualify them for the CHCPE. The two pilots, a Medicaid waiver for up to 50 people and a state-funded program for 25 people, began in January 2003. Applicants must live in a private managed residential community where an ALSA provides the services and be ineligible to receive these services under any other pilot established by the state. The program is currently serving 17 clients at 10 facilities (PA 02-7, May 9 Special Session, CGS 17b-365 & 17b-366).

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