CHAPTER 558*
WAGES

*Function of commissioner of labor with respect to this chapter. 129 C. 345. Cited. 160 C. 133, 139.

Table of Contents

Sec. 31-58. Definitions.
Sec. 31-58a. Minimum wage for minors in government or agricultural employment.
Sec. 31-59. Investigation.
Sec. 31-60. Payment of less than minimum or overtime wage. Regulations.
Sec. 31-61. Wage board.
Sec. 31-62. Report and regulations.
Sec. 31-63. Orders and appeal.
Sec. 31-64. Reconsideration of wage rates.
Sec. 31-65. Modification of orders.
Sec. 31-66. Employers' records. Orders to be posted.
Sec. 31-67. Exception for person with impaired capacity.
Sec. 31-68. Collection of minimum or overtime wage.
Sec. 31-68a. Enforcement of chapter.
Sec. 31-68b. Reciprocal agreements.
Sec. 31-69. Penalty.
Sec. 31-69a. Additional penalty.
Sec. 31-69b. Discharge, discipline, penalty or discrimination prohibited. Right of action.
Sec. 31-70. Withholding wages.
Sec. 31-71. Weekly payment of wages; how paid when employment ends.
Sec. 31-71a. Payment of wages: Definitions.
Sec. 31-71b. Weekly payment of wages.
Sec. 31-71c. Payment of wages on termination of employment.
Sec. 31-71d. Payment where wages disputed.
Sec. 31-71e. Withholding of part of wages.
Sec. 31-71f. Employer to furnish employee certain information.
Sec. 31-71g. Penalty.
Sec. 31-71h. Regulations.
Sec. 31-71i. Waiver of weekly payment requirement.
Sec. 31-72. Civil action to collect wage claim, fringe benefit claim or arbitration award.
Sec. 31-73. Refund of wages for furnishing employment.
Sec. 31-74. Wages not to be scaled.
Sec. 31-74a. Computation and payment of vacation pay.
Sec. 31-75. Discrimination in compensation on account of sex.
Sec. 31-76. Enforcement.
Sec. 31-76a. Investigations on complaint of nonpayment of wages and certain misrepresentations re employees.
Sec. 31-76b. Overtime pay: Definitions.
Sec. 31-76c. Length of workweek.
Sec. 31-76d. Workweek for certain establishments.
Sec. 31-76e. Maximum workweek under contract or collective bargaining agreement.
Sec. 31-76f. Piece rates; two or more kinds of work.
Sec. 31-76g. Crediting of certain extra compensation.
Sec. 31-76h. Hospital employees.
Sec. 31-76i. Exceptions.
Sec. 31-76j. Prior wage orders and regulations.
Sec. 31-76k. Payment of fringe benefits upon termination of employment.
Sec. 31-76l. Regulations.
Sec. 31-76m. Remission of portion of fine or civil penalty to municipality.


PART I*
MINIMUM WAGES

*Minimum wage law should receive liberal construction as regards beneficiaries so it may accomplish its purpose. 147 C. 277. Burden rests on employer to establish that his employees come within exemption. Id. Cited. 223 C. 573, 594.

Sec. 31-58. Definitions. As used in this part:
(a) "Commissioner" means the Labor Commissioner;
(b) "Wage board" means a board created as provided in section 31-61;
(c) "Fair wage" means a wage fairly and reasonably commensurate with the value of a particular service or class of service rendered, and, in establishing a minimum fair wage for such service or class of service under this part, the commissioner and the wage board, without being bound by any technical rules of evidence or procedure, (1) may take into account all relevant circumstances affecting the value of the services rendered, including hours and conditions of employment affecting the health, safety and general well-being of the workers, and (2) may be guided by such considerations as would guide a court in a suit for the reasonable value of services rendered where services are rendered at the request of an employer without contract as to the amount of the wage to be paid and (3) may consider the wages, including overtime or premium rates, paid in the state for work of like or comparable character by employers who voluntarily maintain minimum fair wage standards;
(d) "Department" means the Labor Department;
(e) "Employer" means any owner or any person, partnership, corporation, limited liability company or association of persons acting directly as, or in behalf of, or in the interest of an employer in relation to employees, including the state and any political subdivision thereof;
(f) "Employee" means any individual employed or permitted to work by an employer but shall not include any individual employed in camps or resorts which are open no more than six months of the year or in domestic service in or about a private home, except any individual in domestic service employment as defined in the regulations of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, or an individual employed in a bona fide executive, administrative or professional capacity as defined in the regulations of the Labor Commissioner or an individual employed by the federal government, or any individual engaged in the activities of an educational, charitable, religious, scientific, historical, literary or nonprofit organization where the employer-employee relationship does not, in fact, exist or where the services rendered to such organizations are on a voluntary basis, or any individual employed as a head resident or resident assistant by a college or university, or any individual engaged in baby sitting, or an outside salesman as defined in the regulations of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act; or any individual employed by a nonprofit theater, provided such theater does not operate for more than seven months in any calendar year;
(g) A resort is defined as an establishment under one management whose principal function it is to offer lodging by the day, week, month or season, or part thereof, to vacationers or those in search of recreation;
(h) "Employ" means to employ or suffer to work;
(i) "Wage" means compensation due to an employee by reason of his employment;
(j) "Minimum fair wage" in any industry or occupation in this state means a wage of not less than two dollars and sixty-six cents per hour, and effective January 1, 1979, not less than two dollars and ninety-one cents per hour, and effective January 1, 1980, not less than three dollars and twelve cents per hour, and effective January 1, 1981, not less than three dollars and thirty-seven cents per hour, and effective October 1, 1987, not less than three dollars and seventy-five cents per hour, and effective October 1, 1988, not less than four dollars and twenty-five cents per hour, and effective January 1, 1999, not less than five dollars and sixty-five cents per hour, and effective January 1, 2000, not less than six dollars and fifteen cents per hour, and effective January 1, 2001, not less than six dollars and forty cents per hour, and effective January 1, 2002, six dollars and seventy cents per hour, or one-half of one per cent rounded to the nearest whole cent more than the highest federal minimum wage, whichever is greater, except as may otherwise be established in accordance with the provisions of this part. All wage orders in effect on October 1, 1971, wherein a lower minimum fair wage has been established, are amended to provide for the payment of the minimum fair wage herein established except as hereinafter provided. Whenever the highest federal minimum wage is increased, the minimum fair wage established under this part shall be increased to the amount of said federal minimum wage plus one-half of one per cent more than said federal rate, rounded to the nearest whole cent, effective on the same date as the increase in the highest federal minimum wage, and shall apply to all wage orders and administrative regulations then in force. The rates for learners, beginners, and persons under the age of eighteen years shall be not less than eighty-five per cent of the minimum fair wage for the first two hundred hours of such employment and equal to the minimum fair wage thereafter, except institutional training programs specifically exempted by the commissioner.
(1949 Rev., S. 3786; 1951, S. 2025d; 1957, P.A. 435, S. 1, 2; 1959, P.A. 683, S. 1; 1961, P.A. 519, S. 1, 2; 1963, P.A. 357; 1967, P.A. 484, S. 1; 492, S. 1; 565, S. 1; 1969, P.A. 535; 1971, P.A. 45, S. 1; 85, S. 1; 615, S. 1, 2; 616, S. 1; 1972, P.A. 116, S. 1; P.A. 73-82, S. 3, 4; P.A. 77-154; 77-329; P.A. 78-358, S. 3, 6; P.A. 79-41; P.A. 83-537, S. 1; P.A. 87-366, S. 1; P.A. 93-144, S. 2; P.A. 95-79, S. 114, 189; P.A. 98-44; P.A. 00-144, S. 1.)
History: 1959 act added "owner" and "partnership" to Subsec. (e) and the proviso and authority to define executive, etc., capacity by regulation to Subsec. (f); 1961 act added to Subsec. (f) the clause re employees of industry and increased the minimum wage rate provided for by Subsec. (j); 1963 act included beginners in minimum wage provisions of Subsec. (j), specified that ninety-five cent minimum wage for learners, beginners and persons under eighteen applies for the first five hundred hours of employment, set rate at one dollar and twenty-five cents thereafter and exempted institutional training programs designated by commissioner from pay provision; 1967 acts redefined "employee" to delete reference to individuals exempt under specified Subdivs. of Fair Labor Standards Act and individuals employed in industries for which wage orders have been established as employees, redefined "minimum fair wage", revising wage amounts and reducing hours at which beginners, etc. are paid a lesser amount from five hundred to two hundred; 1969 act redefined "minimum fair wage" to add provisions pegging increases to increases in federal minimum wage; 1971 acts redefined "employee" to delete exclusion for employees of state, municipalities or political subdivisions and redefined "minimum fair wage" to increase wage amounts, to delete provision re formula for increase in gratuities allowance for restaurant employees and to add provision re fair wage for agricultural employees; 1972 act redefined "employee" to delete exclusion for individuals in manufacturing establishments subject to provisions of Fair Labor Standards Act; P.A. 73-82 redefined "employee" to specifically exclude persons employed in executive, administrative, professional or outside sales capacity; P.A. 77-154 excluded employees of nonprofit theaters which operate less than seven months a year from consideration as employees; P.A. 77-329 qualified exclusion of persons in domestic service from consideration as employees by adding exception and excluded baby-sitters; P.A. 78-358 raised minimum wage, pegged rates to "highest" federal minimum wage, changed basis of wage for beginners, etc. from one dollar and fifty cents for the first two hundred hours and one dollar and eighty-five cents thereafter to not less than eighty-five per cent of basic minimum wage for first two hundred hours and equaling basic minimum wage thereafter and deleted provision re minimum wage for agricultural employees; P.A. 79-41 redefined "employer" to include the state and its political subdivisions; P.A. 83-537 amended Subsec. (f) to exempt any individual employed as a head resident or resident assistant at a college or university from the definition of "employee"; P.A. 87-366 amended Subsec. (j) to increase the minimum fair wage to three dollars and seventy-five cents on October 1, 1987, and to four dollars and twenty-five cents on October 1, 1988; P.A. 93-144 redefined "employee" to delete specific exclusion of persons employed in a bona fide executive, administrative or professional capacity; P.A. 95-79 redefined "employer" to include a limited liability company, effective May 31, 1995; P.A. 98-44 amended Subsec. (j) to increase the minimum fair wage to five dollars and sixty-five cents on January 1, 1999, and to six dollars and fifteen cents on January 1, 2000; P.A. 00-144 amended Subsec. (j) to increase the minimum fair wage to six dollars and forty cents on January 1, 2001, and to six dollars and seventy cents on January 1, 2002.
Cited. 219 C. 520, 522, 523.
Subsec. (f):
Authority of labor commissioner to define term "employee" under former statute. 147 C. 277. When one qualifies as an "executive employee." Id. Cited. 160 C. 133, 139. Qualifications for bona fide administrative capacity exclusion discussed. 243 C. 454.

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Sec. 31-58a. Minimum wage for minors in government or agricultural employment. Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (j) of section 31-58, minors between the ages of sixteen and eighteen years who are employees of the state or any political subdivision thereof shall be paid a minimum wage of not less than eighty-five per cent of the minimum fair wage as defined in said subsection, and notwithstanding the provisions of said subsection, minors between the ages of fourteen and eighteen who are agricultural employees shall be paid a minimum wage of not less than eighty-five per cent of the minimum fair wage as defined in said section except agricultural employees between the ages of fourteen and eighteen who are employed by employers who did not, during the preceding calendar year, employ eight or more workers at the same time shall be paid a minimum wage of not less than seventy per cent of the minimum wage as defined in said section 31-58.
(1971, P.A. 85, S. 2; 615, S. 3; P.A. 79-312, S. 1, 2.)
History: P.A. 79-312 added exceptions re payments to agricultural employees between fourteen and eighteen years old who are employed by employers who did not employ eight or more workers during preceding years.

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Sec. 31-59. Investigation. The commissioner or any authorized representative of the commissioner shall have authority: (a) To investigate and ascertain the wages of persons employed in any occupation in the state; (b) to enter the place of business or employment of any employer of persons in any occupation for the purpose of examining and inspecting any and all books, registers, payrolls and other records of any such employer that in any way appertain to or have a bearing upon the question of wages of any such persons and for the purpose of ascertaining whether the provisions of this part and the orders of the commissioner have been and are being complied with; and (c) to require from such employer full and correct statements in writing, when the commissioner or any authorized representative of the commissioner deems necessary, of the wages paid to all persons in his employment. The commissioner may, on his own motion, and shall, on the petition of fifty or more residents of the state, cause an investigation to be made of the wages being paid to persons in any occupation to ascertain whether any substantial number of persons in such occupation is receiving less than a fair wage. If the commissioner is of the opinion that any substantial number of persons in any occupation or occupations is receiving less than a fair wage, he shall appoint a wage board as provided in section 31-61 to report upon the establishment of minimum fair wage rates of not less than the minimum fair wage as defined in section 31-58 for such persons in such occupation or occupations.
(1949 Rev., S. 3787; 1951, S. 2026d; 1957, P.A. 435, S. 3; 1959, P.A. 683, S. 2.)
History: 1959 act removed references to establishment of minimum wage for restaurant, hotel, inn and cabin employees and to one dollar minimum wage substituting wage as defined in Sec. 31-58.
See Sec. 31-22 re commissioner's duties with respect to enforcement of regulations and reporting of violations.
Cited. 140 C. 73. Cited. 223 C. 573, 585.

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Sec. 31-60. Payment of less than minimum or overtime wage. Regulations. (a) Any employer who pays or agrees to pay to an employee less than the minimum fair wage or overtime wage shall be deemed in violation of the provisions of this part.
(b) The Labor Commissioner shall adopt such regulations, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 54, as may be appropriate to carry out the purposes of this part. Such regulations may include, but are not limited to, regulations defining and governing an executive, administrative or professional employee and outside salesperson; learners and apprentices, their number, proportion and length of service; piece rates in relation to time rates; and shall recognize, as part of the minimum fair wage, gratuities in an amount equal to twenty-three per cent of the minimum fair wage per hour for persons employed in the hotel and restaurant industry, including a hotel restaurant, and not to exceed thirty-five cents per hour in any other industry, and shall also recognize deductions and allowances for the value of board, in the amount of eighty-five cents for a full meal and forty-five cents for a light meal, lodging, apparel or other items or services supplied by the employer; and other special conditions or circumstances which may be usual in a particular employer-employee relationship. Notwithstanding the provisions of this subsection, such regulations shall provide that during the period commencing January 1, 2001, and ending December 31, 2002, the minimum wage for persons employed in the hotel and restaurant industry, including a hotel restaurant, who customarily and regularly receive gratuities shall be four dollars and seventy-four cents per hour, except during said period the minimum wage for bartenders who customarily and regularly receive gratuities shall be six dollars and fifteen cents per hour. The commissioner may provide, in such regulations, modifications of the minimum fair wage herein established for learners and apprentices; persons under the age of eighteen years; and for such special cases or classes of cases as the commissioner finds appropriate to prevent curtailment of employment opportunities, avoid undue hardship and safeguard the minimum fair wage herein established. Regulations in effect on July 1, 1973, providing for a board deduction and allowance in an amount differing from that provided in this section shall be construed to be amended consistent herewith without the necessity of convening a wage board or amending said regulations.
(c) Regulations adopted by the commissioner pursuant to subsection (b) of this section which define executive, administrative and professional employees shall be updated not later than October 1, 2000, and every four years thereafter, to specify that such persons shall be compensated on a salary basis at a rate determined by the Labor Commissioner.
(1951, S. 2034d; 1957, P.A. 435, S. 5; 1959, P.A. 683, S. 3; 1961, P.A. 519, S. 3; 1967, P.A. 492, S. 2; 1971, P.A. 616, S. 2; P.A. 73-561, S. 1, 2; 73-616, S. 29, 64, 67; P.A. 80-64, S. 1, 7; P.A. 99-199; P.A. 00-144, S. 2.)
History: 1959 act extended regulatory authority to cover executive, administrative and professional employees, deleted bonuses and special pay from matters subject to regulation and established gratuity rates of thirty-five cents for restaurant employees and thirty cents for others; 1961 act increased gratuity rates and added "based on the actual cost of food and labor"; 1967 act raised maximum gratuities in Subsec. (b) from forty cents per hour to forty-seven cents until July 1, 1968, and fifty cents thereafter for persons employed in hotel and restaurant industry; 1971 act increased gratuities limit to sixty cents per hour; P.A. 73-561 authorized deduction for board "in the amount of eighty-five cents for a full meal and forty- five cents for a full meal" rather than for "reasonable value of board, based on the actual cost of food and labor" in Subsec. (b); P.A. 73-616 amended Subsec. (b) to add provision allowing amendment of regulations without convening a wage board and amended Subsec. (c) to delete provision specifying that regulations take effect upon publication in the Connecticut Law Journal; P.A. 80-64 made recognition of gratuities as part of minimum wage mandatory rather than optional, substituting "shall" for "may", and changed gratuity limit from sixty cents per hour to twenty-three per cent of the minimum fair wage; P.A. 99-199 amended Subsec. (b) to delete provisions requiring commissioner to consult with wage board prior to adopting regulations, to require commissioner to adopt regulations in accordance with the Uniform Administrative Procedure Act and to make gender neutral changes and amended Subsec. (c) to delete provisions specifying procedure for adoption of regulations and to require that regulations defining executive, administrative and professional employees be updated by the commissioner by October 1, 2000, and every four years thereafter; P.A. 00-144 amended Subsec. (b) by making a technical change and adding provisions requiring regulations re the minimum wage for certain hotel and restaurant employees from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2002.
See chapter 54 re uniform administrative procedures.
See Sec. 31-58(j) for definition of "minimum fair wage".
Cited. 140 C. 73. Constitutionality discussed. 142 C. 437. Cited. 219 C. 520, 527. Cited. 223 C. 573, 585, 594.
Limited amount of gratuity allowed for minimum wage. 18 CS 452.

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Sec. 31-61. Wage board. (a) A wage board shall be composed of not more than three representatives of the employers in any occupation or occupations, an equal number of representatives of the employees in such occupation or occupations and not more than three disinterested persons representing the public, one of whom shall be designated as chairman. The commissioner shall appoint the members of such wage board, the representatives of the employers and employees to be selected so far as practicable from nominations submitted by employers and employees in such occupation or occupations. Two-thirds of the members of such wage board shall constitute a quorum and the recommendations or report of such wage board shall require a vote of not less than a majority of all its members. Members of a wage board shall serve without pay. The commissioner shall make, from time to time, rules and regulations governing the selection of a wage board and its mode of procedure not inconsistent with this part.
(b) A wage board shall have power to administer oaths and to require by subpoena the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of all books, records and other evidence relative to any matter under investigation. Such subpoenas shall be signed and issued by the chairman of the wage board and shall be served and have the same effect as if issued out of the Superior Court. A wage board shall have power to cause depositions of witnesses residing within or without the state to be taken in the manner prescribed for like depositions in civil actions in the Superior Court.
(c) The commissioner shall present to a wage board, promptly upon its organization, all the evidence and information in the possession of the commissioner relating to the wages of workers in the occupation for which the wage board was appointed and all other information which the commissioner deems relevant to the establishment of a minimum fair wage for such persons.
(d) Within sixty days of its organization a wage board shall submit a report, including its recommendations as to minimum fair wage standards for the persons in the occupation the wage standards of which the wage board was appointed to investigate. If its report is not submitted within such time, the commissioner may reconstitute the same board or may constitute a new wage board.
(e) A wage board may differentiate and classify employments in any occupation according to the nature of the service rendered and recommend appropriate minimum fair rates for different employments. A wage board, for the purpose of establishing a fair wage, may recommend overtime or part-time rates, or special pay for special or extra work, deductions for board, lodging, apparel or other items or services supplied by the employer or such other conditions or circumstances as may be usual in a particular employer-employee relationship, including gratuities. A wage board may also recommend minimum fair wage rates varying with localities if, in the judgment of the wage board, conditions make such local differentiation equitable and do not effect an unreasonable discrimination against any locality.
(f) A wage board may recommend a suitable scale of rates for learners and apprentices, which may be less than the regular minimum fair wage rates recommended for experienced workers in such occupation or occupations.
(1949 Rev., S. 3788; 1951, S. 2027d.)
Cited. 140 C. 73.

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Sec. 31-62. Report and regulations. (a) A report from a wage board shall be submitted to the commissioner, who shall, within fifteen days, accept or reject such report. If the report is rejected, the commissioner shall resubmit the matter to the same wage board or to a new wage board, with a statement of the reasons for the resubmission. If the report is accepted, it shall be published, together with such administrative regulations as the commissioner deems appropriate, and notice shall be given of a public hearing to be held by the commissioner not sooner than fifteen nor more than thirty days after such publication, at which all persons in favor of or opposed to the recommendations contained in such report or in such proposed regulation may be heard.
(b) Within fifteen days after such hearing, the commissioner shall approve or disapprove the report of the wage board. If the report is disapproved, the commissioner may resubmit the matter to the same wage board or to a new wage board. If the report is approved, the commissioner shall make an order, which shall define minimum fair wage rates in the occupation or occupations as recommended in the report of the wage board and which shall include such proposed administrative regulations as the commissioner deems appropriate. Such administrative regulations may include, among other things, regulations defining and governing outside salesmen; learners and apprentices, their rates, number, proportion or length of service; piece rates or their relation to time rates; overtime or part-time rates; bonuses or special pay for special or extra work; deductions for board, lodging, apparel or other items or services supplied by the employer; and other special conditions or circumstances. The commissioner may provide in such regulations, without departing from the basic minimum rates recommended by the wage board, such modifications or reductions of or additions to such rates in or for such special cases or classes of cases as those herein enumerated as the commissioner finds appropriate to safeguard the basic minimum rates established.
(1949 Rev., S. 3789; 1951, S. 2028d.)
Cited. 140 C. 73.

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Sec. 31-63. Orders and appeal. Any person in interest in any occupation for which any administrative regulation or a minimum fair wage order has been issued under the provisions of this part who is aggrieved by such regulation or such order may obtain a review of such regulation or such order in the Superior Court by filing an appeal pursuant to the provisions of chapter 54. Hearings in the Superior Court on all appeals taken under the provisions hereof shall be privileged and take precedence over all other matters, except matters of the same character. The jurisdiction of the court shall be exclusive and its judgment and decree final, except that the same shall be subject to review by the Appellate Court, under the provisions of section 51-197b.
(1949 Rev., S. 3791; 1951, S. 2029d; 1971, P.A. 870, S. 87; P.A. 74-183, S. 267, 291; P.A. 76-436, S. 230, 681; June Sp. Sess. P.A. 83-29, S. 26, 82; P.A. 88-317, S. 33, 107.)
History: 1971 act replaced superior court with court of common pleas, effective September 1, 1971, except that courts with cases pending retain jurisdiction unless pending matters deemed transferable; P.A. 74-183 specified that supreme court review is pursuant to Sec. 51-265 later transferred to Sec. 52-6a; P.A. 76-436 replaced court of common pleas with superior court and reference to Sec. 52-6a with reference to Sec. 52-7, effective July 1, 1978; June Sp. Sess. P.A. 83-29 deleted reference to supreme court and substituted appellate court in lieu thereof; P.A. 88-317 required appeal to be filed "pursuant to the provisions of chapter 54" instead of specifying the procedure for the appeal, effective July 1, 1989, and applicable to all agency proceedings commencing on or after that date.
A party cannot avail himself of an appeal as provided for by a statute and in the same proceeding attack the constitutionality of the statute; but the taking of an appeal does not preclude the raising of the constitutional issue in an independent proceeding. 142 C. 437.
Regulations concerning gratuities need not be in conformity with this section. 18 CS 452.

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Sec. 31-64. Reconsideration of wage rates. At any time after a minimum fair wage order has been in effect for six months or more, the commissioner may, on his own motion, and shall, on petition of fifty or more residents of the state, reconsider the minimum fair wage rates set therein and reconvene the same wage board or appoint a new wage board to recommend whether or not the rate or rates contained in such order should be modified. The report of such wage board shall be dealt with in the manner prescribed in section 31-62.
(1949 Rev., S. 3792; 1951, S. 2030d.)

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Sec. 31-65. Modification of orders. The commissioner may, from time to time, propose such modification of or additions to any administrative regulations included in any order of the commissioner, without reference to a wage board, as he deems appropriate to effectuate the purposes of this part, provided such proposed modification or additions could legally have been included in the original order, and notice shall be given of a public hearing to be held by the commissioner not less than fifteen days after such publication, at which all persons in favor of or opposed to such proposed modifications or additions may be heard. After such hearing, the commissioner may make an order putting into effect such proposed modifications of or additions to the administrative regulations as he deems appropriate.
(1949 Rev., S. 3793; 1951, S. 2031d.)

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Sec. 31-66. Employers' records. Orders to be posted. Each employer subject to the provisions of this part, unless exempted by regulation issued by the commissioner or as hereinafter provided, shall keep at the place of employment for a period of three years a true and accurate record of the hours worked by, and the wages paid by him to, each employee, as required by the applicable regulations issued by the Labor Commissioner, and shall furnish to the commissioner or his authorized representative, upon demand, a sworn statement of the same provided if the place of employment is designed primarily as an establishment for the housing and use of coin-operated service or vending machines, such records may be kept by the employer in some location approved by the commissioner other than at the place of employment. Such records shall be open to inspection by the commissioner or his authorized representative at any reasonable time. Each employer subject to this part or to a minimum fair wage order shall keep a copy of such order and the regulations issued by the Labor Commissioner posted at the place of employment where it can be read easily by the employees. Employers shall be furnished copies of orders and regulations on request, without charge.
(1949 Rev., S. 3794; 1951, S. 2032d; 1959, P.A. 683, S. 4; 1969, P.A. 466.)
History: 1959 act specified place and length of time for keeping records as required by commissioner's regulations; removed requirement to post provisions of this part but required posting of regulations, specified posting to be at place of employment and provided for furnishing of regulations without charge; 1969 act allowed employer to keep required records at place authorized by commissioner rather than at place of employment if place of employment is primarily used for housing vending or coin-operated machines.
See Sec. 31-13a re requirement that employers furnish employees with record of hours worked, wages earned and deductions.
Officer of corporation, whose duties are supervisory and whose hours are not controlled and whose compensation is not dependent on hours worked, is not within contemplation of statute. 129 C. 344. Cited. 223 C. 573, 594.
Where duties of a nominal president are insignificant and he performs the same kind and class of work as other employees, such person is an employee. 10 CS 171.

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Sec. 31-67. Exception for person with impaired capacity. The commissioner may cause to be issued, to any person whose earning capacity is impaired by age or physical or mental deficiency or injury, a special license authorizing employment at such wages less than the minimum fair wage and for such period of time as is fixed by the commissioner and stated in the license.
(1949 Rev., S. 3790; 1957, P.A. 435, S. 4.)

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Sec. 31-68. Collection of minimum or overtime wage. (a) If any employee is paid by his employer less than the minimum fair wage or overtime wage to which he is entitled under sections 31-58, 31-59 and 31-60 or by virtue of a minimum fair wage order he may recover, in a civil action, twice the full amount of such minimum wage less any amount actually paid to him by the employer, with costs and such reasonable attorney's fees as may be allowed by the court, and any agreement between him and his employer to work for less than such minimum fair wage or overtime wage shall be no defense to such action. The commissioner may collect the full amount of unpaid minimum fair wages or unpaid overtime wages to which an employee is entitled under said sections or order, as well as interest calculated in accordance with the provisions of section 31-265 from the date the wages should have been received, had they been paid in a timely manner. In addition, the commissioner may bring any legal action necessary to recover twice the full amount of the unpaid minimum fair wages or unpaid overtime wages to which the employee is entitled under said sections or under an order, and the employer shall be required to pay the costs and such reasonable attorney's fees as may be allowed by the court. The commissioner shall distribute any wages or interest collected pursuant to this section to the employee or in accordance with the provisions of subsection (b) of this section.
(b) All wages collected by the commissioner for an employee whose whereabouts are unknown to the commissioner shall be held by the commissioner for three months and thereafter the commissioner may, in his discretion, pay the same, on application, to the husband or wife or, if none, to the next of kin of such employee. As a condition of such payment, the commissioner or his authorized representative shall require proof of the relationship of the claimant and the execution of a bond of indemnity and a receipt for such payment. Any such wages held by the commissioner for two years without being claimed shall escheat to the state, subject to the provisions of sections 3-66a to 3-71a, inclusive.
(1949 Rev., S. 3796; 1959, P.A. 683, S. 5; 1963, P.A. 124; P.A. 89-157, S. 1; P.A. 94-184, S. 1.)
History: 1959 act added overtime wage; 1963 act added Subsec. (b) re disposition of wages of employee whose whereabouts are unknown; P.A. 89-157 provided that an employee may recover twice the amount of wages due him, authorized the commissioner to collect unpaid wages on behalf of the employee and to bring any legal action necessary for the collection of the wages and provided for the distribution of any collected wages; P.A. 94-184 deleted reference to repealed Sec. 3-72a.
Cited. 140 C. 73. Cited. 223 C. 573, 586. Cited. 232 C. 91, 114.
Formula for determining minimum hourly rate examined. 18 CS 157.

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Sec. 31-68a. Enforcement of chapter. The Labor Commissioner may act as agent for or in cooperation with the federal government in the enforcement of this chapter, and as requested by the federal government to aid and assist in the effecting of payment of the prescribed minimum or overtime wage, under either the law of this state or under federal law.
(1971, P.A. 45, S. 2.)

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Sec. 31-68b. Reciprocal agreements. (a) In the performance of his duties under part III of chapter 557 and this chapter, the Labor Commissioner may enter into reciprocal agreements with the Labor Department or corresponding agency of any other state or with the person, board, officer or commission authorized to act on behalf of the Labor Department or corresponding agency, for the collection in such other state of claims and judgments for wages based upon violations of part III of chapter 557 and this chapter by out-of-state employers.
(b) The Labor Commissioner may, to the extent provided for by any reciprocal agreement entered into pursuant to subsection (a) of this section, maintain actions in the courts of such other state for the collection of claims and judgments for wages and may assign such claims and judgments to the Labor Department or agency of such other state for collection to the extent that an assignment is permitted or provided for by the law of such state or by reciprocal agreement.
(c) The commissioner may, upon the written consent of the Labor Department or other corresponding agency of any other state or of a person, board, officer or commission authorized to act on behalf of the Labor Department or corresponding agency of such other state maintain actions in the courts of this state upon assigned claims and judgments for wages arising in such other state in the same manner and to the same extent that such actions by the commissioner are authorized when arising in this state; provided, such actions may be maintained only in cases where such other state by law or reciprocal agreement extends a like comity to cases arising in this state.
(P.A. 93-392, S. 9; 93-435, S. 66; P.A. 94-58.)
History: P.A. 93-435 made technical change in Subsec. (a); P.A. 94-58 applied Subsec. (a) to all out-of-state-employers where previously applicable only to out-of-state employers performing work "for this state, its agencies or any political subdivision of this state".

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Sec. 31-69. Penalty. (a) Any employer or his agent, or the officer or agent of any corporation, who discharges or in any other manner discriminates against any employee because such employee has served or is about to serve on a wage board or has testified or is about to testify before any wage board or in any other investigation or proceeding under or related to this part, or because such employer believes that such employee may serve on any wage board or may testify before any wage board or in any investigation or proceeding under this part, shall be fined not less than one hundred dollars nor more than four hundred dollars.
(b) Any employer or the officer or agent of any corporation who pays or agrees to pay to any employee less than the rates applicable to such employee under the provisions of this part or a minimum fair wage order shall be: (1) Fined not less than four thousand nor more than ten thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than five years or both for each offense if the total amount of all unpaid wages owed to an employee is more than two thousand dollars; (2) fined not less than two thousand nor more than four thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than one year or both for each offense if the total amount of all unpaid wages owed to an employee is more than one thousand dollars but not more than two thousand dollars; (3) fined not less than one thousand nor more than two thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than six months or both for each offense if the total amount of all unpaid wages owed to an employee is more than five hundred but not more than one thousand dollars; or (4) fined not less than four hundred nor more than one thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than three months or both for each offense if the total amount of all unpaid wages owed to an employee is five hundred dollars or less.
(c) Any employer, his officer or agent, or the officer or agent of any corporation, firm or partnership, who fails to keep the records required under this part or by regulation made in accordance with this part or to furnish such records to the commissioner or any authorized representative of the commissioner, upon request, or who refuses to admit the commissioner or his authorized representative to his place of employment or who hinders or delays the commissioner or his authorized representative in the performance of his duties in the enforcement of this part shall be fined not less than fifty dollars nor more than two hundred dollars, and each day of such failure to keep the records required under this part or to furnish the same to the commissioner or any authorized representative of the commissioner shall constitute a separate offense, and each day of refusal to admit or of hindering or delaying the commissioner or his authorized representative shall constitute a separate offense.
(d) Nothing in this part shall be deemed to interfere with, impede or in any way diminish the right of employees to bargain collectively with their employers through representatives of their own choosing in order to establish wages or conditions of work in excess of the applicable minimum under this part.
(1949 Rev., S. 3795; 1951, S. 2033d; 1959, P.A. 683, S. 6; P.A. 93-392, S. 3; P.A. 97-263, S. 18.)
History: 1959 act added failure to keep records required by regulation to penalty provision; P.A. 93-392 amended Subsec. (b) to increase the maximum fine and prison term for nonpayment of minimum or overtime wages from two hundred dollars and ninety days to five thousand dollars and five years, and to allow for the imposition of varying fines and prison terms based on the amount of wages owed by an employer; P.A. 97-263 doubled the amount of all fines in Subsecs. (a), (b) and (c).
Failure to keep records not material when court finds number of hours worked in action between employer and employee. 140 C. 73. Cited. 223 C. 573, 585, 586.
Cited. 10 CS 171.

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Sec. 31-69a. Additional penalty. In addition to the penalties provided in part III of chapter 557, this chapter and chapter 568, any employer, officer, agent or other person who violates any provision of part III of chapter 557, this chapter or subsection (g) of section 31-288, shall be liable to the Labor Department for a civil penalty of three hundred dollars for each violation of said chapters and for each violation of subsection (g) of section 31-288. The Attorney General, upon complaint of the Labor Commissioner, shall institute a civil action to recover such civil penalty. Any amount recovered shall be deposited in the General Fund and credited to a separate nonlapsing appropriation to the Labor Department, for other current expenses, and may be used by the Labor Department to enforce the provisions of part III of chapter 557, this chapter and subsection (g) of section 31-288.
(P.A. 93-392, S. 8; May Sp. Sess. P.A. 94-6, S. 11, 28; P.A. 97-263, S. 19; P.A. 00-58, S. 1.)
History: May Sp. Sess. P.A. 94-6 specified that the appropriation to the department is "separate and nonlapsing" and substituted the budget line item for the appropriation from "personal services" to "other expenses", effective June 21, 1994; P.A. 97-263 increased amount of fine from one hundred fifty to three hundred dollars; P.A. 00-58 added references to chapter 568 and Sec. 31-288(g) and made conforming technical changes.

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Sec. 31-69b. Discharge, discipline, penalty or discrimination prohibited. Right of action. (a) An employer shall not discharge, discipline, penalize or in any manner discriminate against any employee because the employee has filed a claim or instituted or caused to be instituted any investigation or proceeding under part III of chapter 557 or this chapter, or has testified or is about to testify in any such proceeding or because of the exercise by such employee on behalf of himself or others of any right afforded by part III of chapter 557 or this chapter.
(b) Any employee who believes that he has been discharged, disciplined, penalized or otherwise discriminated against by any person in violation of this section may file a complaint with the Labor Commissioner alleging violation of the provisions of subsection (a) of this section. Upon receipt of any such complaint, the commissioner shall hold a hearing. After the hearing, the commissioner shall send each party a written copy of his decision. The commissioner may award the employee all appropriate relief including rehiring or reinstatement to his previous job, payment of back wages and reestablishment of employee benefits to which he otherwise would have been eligible if he had not been discharged, disciplined, penalized or discriminated against. Any employee who prevails in such a complaint shall be awarded reasonable attorney's fees and costs. Any party aggrieved by the decision of the commissioner may appeal the decision to the Superior Court in accordance with the provisions of chapter 54.
(P.A. 93-392, S. 10; 93-435, S. 67.)
History: P.A. 93-435 made technical changes and deleted a provision prohibiting an employer from discharging, disciplining, penalizing in any manner or discriminating against any employee who institutes or testifies at a proceeding under part III of chapter 557 or chapter 558.

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PART II*
GENERAL PROVISIONS

*Cited. 16 CA 232, 236. Secs. 31-70−31-76k cited. Id., 232, 236, 238.

Sec. 31-70. Withholding wages. Any person who or corporation which withholds any part of the wages of any person, because of any agreement expressed or implied requiring notice before leaving the employment, shall be fined not more than fifty dollars.
(1949 Rev., S. 7360.)
Statute does not apply when it is agreed that reciprocal notice shall be given. 58 C. 104.
Never been construed as prohibiting assignment of wages. 15 CS 37.

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Sec. 31-71. Weekly payment of wages; how paid when employment ends. Section 31-71 is repealed.
(1949 Rev., S. 7361, 7362; 1951, S. 3013d; 1961, P.A. 264, S. 7; 1967, P.A. 714, S. 10.)

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Sec. 31-71a. Payment of wages: Definitions. Whenever used in sections 31-71a to 31-71i, inclusive:
(1) "Employer" includes any individual, partnership, association, joint stock company, trust, corporation, the administrator or executor of the estate of a deceased person, the conservator of the estate of an incompetent, or the receiver, trustee, successor or assignee of any of the same, employing any person, including the state and any political subdivision thereof;
(2) "Employee" includes any person suffered or permitted to work by an employer;
(3) "Wages" means compensation for labor or services rendered by an employee, whether the amount is determined on a time, task, piece, commission or other basis of calculation;
(4) "Commissioner" means the Labor Commissioner.
(1967, P.A. 714, S. 1; P.A. 87-366, S. 2.)
History: P.A. 87-366 amended Subdiv. (1) to include the state and its political subdivisions within "employer" definition.
Cited. 212 C. 294, 300, 303. Cited. 231 C. 690, 693, 694, 696.
Cited. 18 CA 451, 452, 459.
Subdiv. (1):
Cited. 209 C. 818. Cited 212 C. 294, 296, 297, 300. Cited. 219 C. 217, 229. Cited. 231 C. 690, 696.
Cited. 37 CA 379, 387, 388.
Subdiv. (2):
Cited. 228 C. 106, 114. Cited. 231 C. 690, 696, 699.
Subdiv. (3):
Cited. 231 C. 690, 696.
Cited. 8 CA 254, 260. Cited. 16 CA 232, 238. Cited. Id., 437, 443. Cited. 27 CA 800, 804, 805.
Cited. 40 CS 246, 248.

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Sec. 31-71b. Weekly payment of wages. (a) Except as otherwise provided in section 12-34b, each employer, by himself, his agent or representative, shall pay weekly all moneys due each employee on a regular pay day, designated in advance by the employer, in cash, by negotiable checks or, upon an employee's written request, by credit to such employee's account in any bank which has agreed with the employer to accept such wage deposits.
(b) The end of the pay period for which payment is made on a regular pay day shall be not more than eight days before such regular pay day, provided, if such regular pay day falls on a nonwork day, payment shall be made on the preceding work day.
(c) This section shall not be construed to prohibit a local or regional board of education and a recognized or certified exclusive bargaining representative of its certified employees from including within their collective bargaining agreement a schedule for the payment of wages to certified employees that differs from the requirements of subsections (a) and (b) of this section.
(1967, P.A. 714, S. 2; 1969, P.A. 251, S. 1; P.A. 00-65, S. 1, 2.)
History: 1969 act authorized payment of wages by credit to employee's bank account upon employee's written request in Subsec. (a); P.A. 00-65 added new Subsec. (c) re payment of wages to certified employees of local and regional boards of education, effective May 16, 2000.
Cited. 212 C. 294, 303. Cited. 228 C. 106, 114.
Cited. 36 CA 29, 32, 38−40. Constitutional requirement of due process not violated merely because mens rea is not required element of a prescribed crime. 37 CA 379−384, 387, 388.
Subsec. (a):
Cited. 36 CA 29, 30, 38.

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Sec. 31-71c. Payment of wages on termination of employment. (a) Whenever an employee voluntarily terminates his employment, the employer shall pay the employee's wages in full not later than the next regular pay day, as designated under section 31- 71b, either through the regular payment channels or by mail.
(b) Whenever an employer discharges an employee, the employer shall pay the employee's wages in full not later than the business day next succeeding the date of such discharge.
(c) When work of any employee is suspended as a result of a labor dispute, or when an employee for any reason is laid off, the employer shall pay in full to such employee the wages earned by him not later than the next regular pay day, as designated under section 31-71b.
(1967, P.A. 714, S. 3.)
Cited. 212 C. 294, 303.
Subsec. (b):
Cited. 40 CS 246, 248.

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Sec. 31-71d. Payment where wages disputed. (a) In case of a dispute over the amount of wages, the employer shall pay, without condition and within the time set by sections 31-71a to 31-71i, inclusive, all wages, or parts thereof, conceded by him to be due, and the employee shall have all remedies provided by law, including those under said sections as to recovery of any balance claimed.
(b) The acceptance by any employee of a payment under this section shall not constitute a release as to the balance of his claim and any release required by an employer as a condition to payment shall be void.
(1967, P.A. 714, S. 4.)
Cited. 212 C. 294, 303, 306.
Subsec. (a):
Cited. 212 C. 294, 306.

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Sec. 31-71e. Withholding of part of wages. No employer may withhold or divert any portion of an employee's wages unless (1) the employer is required or empowered to do so by state or federal law, or (2) the employer has written authorization from the employee for deductions on a form approved by the commissioner, or (3) the deductions are authorized by the employee, in writing, for medical, surgical or hospital care or service, without financial benefit to the employer and recorded in the employer's wage record book.
(1967, P.A. 714, S. 5.)
Cited. 212 C. 294, 303.
Plaintiff, an at-will employee, failed to provide any law or legal analysis to support claim that trial court improperly concluded that, in implementing furlough program affecting all salaried and hourly employees, employer did not violate statute prohibiting withholding of any portion of an employee's salary. 52 CA 724.
Cited. 40 CS 246, 248.

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Sec. 31-71f. Employer to furnish employee certain information. Each employer shall: (1) Advise his employees in writing, at the time of hiring, of the rate of remuneration, hours of employment and wage payment schedules, and (2) make available to his employees, either in writing or through a posted notice maintained in a place accessible to his employees, any employment practices and policies or change therein with regard to wages, vacation pay, sick leave, health and welfare benefits and comparable matters.
(1967, P.A. 714, S. 6.)
Cited. 212 C. 294, 303.

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Sec. 31-71g. Penalty. Any employer or any officer or agent of an employer or any other person authorized by an employer to pay wages who violates any provision of this part may be: (1) Fined not less than two thousand nor more than five thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than five years or both for each offense if the total amount of all unpaid wages owed to an employee is more than two thousand dollars; (2) fined not less than one thousand nor more than two thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than one year or both for each offense if the total amount of all unpaid wages owed to an employee is more than one thousand dollars but not more than two thousand dollars; (3) fined not less than five hundred nor more than one thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than six months or both for each offense if the total amount of all unpaid wages owed to an employee is more than five hundred but not more than one thousand dollars; or (4) fined not less than two hundred nor more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned not more than three months or both for each offense if the total amount of all unpaid wages owed to an employee is five hundred dollars or less.
(1967, P.A. 714, S. 7; P.A. 78-358, S. 1, 6; P.A. 93-392, S. 4.)
History: P.A. 78-358 made imposition of penalty optional rather than mandatory, substituting "may" for "shall", imposed minimum fine of two hundred dollars and raised maximum fine from two hundred to one thousand dollars; P.A. 93-392 increased the maximum penalty for violating the state's wage laws from one thousand dollars and thirty days to five thousand dollars and five years, and to allow for the imposition of varying fines and prison terms based on the amount of wages owed by an employer.
Cited. 212 C. 294, 303. Structural relationship to Sec. 31-72 discussed. 243 C. 454.
Cited. 36 CA 29, 40. Cited. 37 CA 379, 386, 388.

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Sec. 31-71h. Regulations. The commissioner is authorized to issue regulations for the establishment of procedures for carrying out the provisions of sections 31-71a to 31-71i, inclusive.
(1967, P.A. 714, S. 8.)
Cited. 212 C. 294, 303.

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Sec. 31-71i. Waiver of weekly payment requirement. The commissioner may, upon application, waive the provisions of section 31-71b with respect to any particular week or weeks, and may also, upon application, permit any employer, subject to the provisions of this section, to establish regular pay days less frequently than weekly, provided each employee affected shall be paid in full at least once in each calendar month on a regularly established schedule.
(1967, P.A. 714, S. 9.)
Cited. 212 C. 294, 303.

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Sec. 31-72. Civil action to collect wage claim, fringe benefit claim or arbitration award. When any employer fails to pay an employee wages in accordance with the provisions of sections 31-71a to 31-71i, inclusive, or fails to compensate an employee in accordance with section 31-76k or where an employee or a labor organization representing an employee institutes an action to enforce an arbitration award which requires an employer to make an employee whole or to make payments to an employee welfare fund, such employee or labor organization may recover, in a civil action, twice the full amount of such wages, with costs and such reasonable attorney's fees as may be allowed by the court, and any agreement between him and his employer for payment of wages other than as specified in said sections shall be no defense to such action. The Labor Commissioner may collect the full amount of any such unpaid wages, payments due to an employee welfare fund or such arbitration award, as well as interest calculated in accordance with the provisions of section 31-265 from the date the wages or payment should have been received, had payment been made in a timely manner. In addition, the Labor Commissioner may bring any legal action necessary to recover twice the full amount of unpaid wages, payments due to an employee welfare fund or arbitration award, and the employer shall be required to pay the costs and such reasonable attorney's fees as may be allowed by the court. The commissioner shall distribute any wages, arbitration awards or payments due to an employee welfare fund collected pursuant to this section to the appropriate person.
(1951, S. 1291b; 1955, S. 3015d; 1967, P.A. 641; P.A. 78-358, S. 2, 6; P.A. 89-157, S. 2; P.A. 90-55, S. 1, 3.)
History: 1967 act deleted reference to repealed Sec. 31-71, added reference to Secs. 31-71a to 31-37i, authorized recoveries by labor organizations and made provisions applicable to cases where employee or labor organization institutes action to enforce arbitration award; P.A. 78-358 authorized recovery of twice the amount of wages and costs where previously recovery was limited to the amount itself and substituted "recover the amount provided by this section" for "collect such claim" in provision re bringing of legal action; P.A. 89-157 deleted the provisions allowing the labor commissioner to take an assignment of an employee's wage claim and provided for the collection and distribution by the labor commissioner of unpaid wages, payments due an employee welfare fund and arbitration awards; P.A. 90-55 made provisions applicable to cases where employer has failed to compensate an employee in accordance with Sec. 31-76k.
See Sec. 31-89a re civil action to collect past due payments to employee welfare funds.
See Sec. 52-596 re statute of limitation for actions for payment of remuneration for employment.
Award of attorney's fees and costs does not apply to proceedings to confirm, modify or vacate arbitration awards, which are not civil actions within meaning of title 52, but only to civil actions later brought to enforce such orders. 176 C. 401− 403, 405, 406, 408, 409. Cited. 209 C. 818. Cited. 211 C. 648, 652. Cited. 212 C. 294, 295, 297−306, 308−310. Cited. 217 C. 490, 495. Cited. 219 C. 217, 218, 229. Legislature did not exempt real estate salespersons from section as was done in Unemployment and Workers' Compensation Acts. 231 C. 690−696, 699, 700. Award of double damages justified where employer requested employee to work additional hours, assured employee that she would be paid and then subsequently denied payment of overtime wages. 243 C. 454. Determination of whether an individual can be considered an employer where a corporate entity exists depends on the individual's authority to control hours and wages and responsibility for illegally withholding wages. Id.
Cited. 8 CA 254, 255, 260−262, 264−266, 269−272. Cited. 10 CA 22, 31. Provisions govern collection of wages; employees' rights under these statutory provisions are not preempted by collective bargaining agreements. 16 CA 232, 233, 235, 238, 239. Cited. 18 CA 618, 619, 621. Cited. 26 CA 251, 252. Cited. 27 CA 800−805. Cited. 35 CA 31, 35, 42− 44. Cited. 36 CA 29, 40.

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Sec. 31-73. Refund of wages for furnishing employment. (a) When used in this section, "refund of wages" means: (1) The return by an employee to his employer or to any agent of his employer of any sum of money actually paid or owed to the employee in return for services performed or (2) payment by the employer or his agent to an employee of wages at a rate less than that agreed to by the employee or by any authorized person or organization legally acting on his behalf.
(b) No employer, contractor, subcontractor, foreman, superintendent or supervisor of labor, acting by himself or by his agent, shall, directly or indirectly, demand, request, receive or exact any refund of wages, fee, sum of money or contribution from any person, or deduct any part of the wages agreed to be paid, upon the representation or the understanding that such refund of wages, fee, sum of money, contribution or deduction is necessary to secure employment or continue in employment. No such person shall require, request or demand that any person agree to make payment of any refund of wages, fee, contribution or deduction from wages in order to obtain employment or continue in employment. A payment to any person of a smaller amount of wages than the wage set forth in any written wage agreement or the repayment of any part of any wages received, if such repayment is not made in the payment of a debt evidenced by an instrument in writing, shall be prima facie evidence of a violation of this section.
(c) The provisions of this section shall not apply to any deductions from wages made in accordance with the provisions of any law, or of any rule or regulation made by any governmental agency.
(d) Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be fined not more than one hundred dollars or imprisoned not more than thirty days for the first offense, and, for each subsequent offense, shall be fined not more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned not more than six months or both.
(1949 Rev., S. 7363.)
Cited. 37 CA 85, 91−99.
Subsec. (b):
Cited. 37 CA 85, 91, 92, 98.

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Sec. 31-74. Wages not to be scaled. No employer of labor or any person acting for him shall make a discount or deduction from the wages of any person employed by him, when the wages of the employee or any part thereof are paid at an earlier time than that at which such wages would regularly have been paid. Any person violating any provision of this section shall be fined not more than one hundred dollars.
(1949 Rev., S. 7366.)

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Sec. 31-74a. Computation and payment of vacation pay. Whenever an employee is eligible to receive both vacation pay and his regular wage payment on the same pay day, his employer shall compute federal social security and withholding taxes from the regular wage payment and the vacation pay separately.
(P.A. 84-303.)

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Sec. 31-75. Discrimination in compensation on account of sex. No employer shall discriminate in the amount of compensation paid to any employee solely on the basis of sex. Any difference in pay based on sex shall be deemed a discrimination within the meaning of this section, provided nothing herein shall be deemed to prevent the operation of employment practices which recognize length of service or merit rating as a factor in determining wage or salary rates.
(1949, 1953, S. 3016d.)
Cited. 38 CA 506, 508.

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Sec. 31-76. Enforcement. The Labor Commissioner shall carry out the provisions of section 31-75 either upon complaint or upon his own motion. For this purpose, the commissioner, or his authorized representative, may enter places of employment, inspect payrolls, investigate work and operations on which employees are engaged, question employees and take such action as is reasonably necessary to determine compliance with section 31-75. Any employer who violates the provisions of section 31-75 shall be liable to the employee or the employees affected for the difference between the amount of wages paid and the maximum wage paid any other employee for equal work. Action to recover such difference may be maintained in any court of competent jurisdiction by any one or more employees. Any agreement to work for less than the wage to which such employee is entitled under section 31-75 shall not be a defense to such action. At the request of any employee who has received less than the wage to which he is entitled under section 31-75, the commissioner may take an assignment of such wage claim in trust and may bring any legal action necessary to collect such claim. If judgment is rendered against an employer in any civil action brought to collect wages under the provisions of this section, the employer shall be required to pay the taxable costs and such reasonable attorney's fees as may be allowed by the court. No action shall be brought or any prosecution instituted for any violation of section 31-75 unless within one year after the commission of the act complained of. Any person who violates section 31-75 or any employer who discriminates in any manner against any employee because such employee has filed a complaint or taken any other action as herein provided shall, upon conviction, be fined for each violation not more than two hundred dollars.
(1953, S. 3017d; P.A. 97-263, S. 20.)
History: P.A. 97-263 increased amount of fine from one hundred to two hundred dollars.
See Sec. 31-22 re commissioner's duties re enforcement of regulations and reporting of violations.
Cited. 165 C. 318, 337.

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Sec. 31-76a. Investigations on complaint of nonpayment of wages and certain misrepresentations re employees. (a) On receipt of a complaint for nonpayment of wages or a violation of the provisions of subsection (g) of section 31-288, the Labor Commissioner, the director of minimum wage and wage enforcement agents of the Labor Department shall have power to enter, during usual business hours, the place of business or employment of any employer to determine compliance with the wage payment laws or subsection (g) of section 31-288, and for such purpose may examine payroll and other records and interview employees, call hearings, administer oaths, take testimony under oath and take depositions in the manner provided by sections 52-148a to 52-148e, inclusive.
(b) The commissioner or the director, for such purpose, may issue subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses and the production of books and records. Any employer or any officer or agent of any employer, corporation, firm or partnership who wilfully fails to furnish time and wage records as required by law to the commissioner, the director of minimum wage or any wage enforcement agent upon request, or who refuses to admit the commissioner, the director or such agent to the place of employment of such employer, corporation, firm or partnership, or who hinders or delays the commissioner, the director or such agent in the performance of the commissioner's, the director's or such agent's duties in the enforcement of this section shall be fined not less than twenty- five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars. Each day of such failure to furnish the time and wage records to the commissioner, the director or such agent shall constitute a separate offense, and each day of refusal to admit, of hindering or of delaying the commissioner, the director or such agent shall constitute a separate offense.
(1959, P.A. 369; P.A. 77-604, S. 31, 84; P.A. 00-58, S. 2.)
History: P.A. 77-604 substituted reference to Secs. 52-148a to 52-148e for reference to Sec. 52-148; P.A. 00-58 divided existing provisions into Subsecs. (a) and (b), added references to Sec. 31-288(g) in Subsec. (a) and made technical changes in Subsec. (b).

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Sec. 31-76b. Overtime pay: Definitions. As used in sections 31-76b to 31-76j, inclusive:
(1) The "regular rate" at which an employee is employed shall be deemed to include all remuneration for employment paid to, or on behalf of, the employee, but shall not be deemed to include (A) sums paid as gifts; payments in the nature of gifts made at Christmas time or on other special occasions, as a reward for service, the amounts of which are not measured by or dependent on hours worked, production or efficiency; (B) payments made for occasional periods when no work is performed due to vacation, holiday, illness, failure of the employer to provide sufficient work, or other similar cause; reasonable payments for traveling expenses, or other expenses, incurred by an employee in the furtherance of his employer's interests and properly reimbursable by the employer; and other similar payments to an employee which are not made as compensation for his hours of employment; (C) sums paid in recognition of services performed during a given period if either, (i) both the fact that payment is to be made and the amount of the payment are determined at the sole discretion of the employer at or near the end of the period and not pursuant to any prior contract, agreement or promise causing the employee to expect such payments regularly; (ii) the payments are made pursuant to a bona fide profit-sharing plan or trust or bona fide thrift or savings plan, meeting the approval of the Labor Commissioner who shall give due regard, among other relevant factors, to the extent to which the amounts paid to the employee are determined with regard to hours of work, production or efficiency; (D) contributions irrevocably made by an employer to a trustee or third person pursuant to a bona fide plan for providing old-age, retirement, life, accident or health insurance or similar benefits for employees; (E) extra compensation provided by a premium rate paid for certain hours worked by the employee in any day or workweek because such hours are hours worked in excess of eight in a day or in excess of the maximum workweek applicable to such employee under section 31-76c, or in excess of the employee's normal working hours or regular working hours, as the case may be; (F) extra compensation provided by a premium rate paid for work by the employee on Saturdays, Sundays, holidays or regular days of rest, or on the sixth or seventh day of the workweek, where such premium rate is not less than one and one-half times the rate established in good faith for like work performed in nonovertime hours on other days; or (G) extra compensation provided by a premium rate paid to the employee, in pursuance of an applicable employment contract or collective-bargaining agreement, for work outside of the hours established in good faith by the contract or agreement as the basic, normal or regular workday, not exceeding the maximum workweek applicable to such employee under section 31-76c, where such premium rate is not less than one and one-half times the rate established in good faith by the contract or agreement for like work performed during such workday or workweek;
(2) (A) "Hours worked" include all time during which an employee is required by the employer to be on the employer's premises or to be on duty, or to be at the prescribed work place, and all time during which an employee is employed or permitted to work, whether or not required to do so, provided time allowed for meals shall be excluded unless the employee is required or permitted to work. Such time includes, but shall not be limited to, the time when an employee is required to wait on the premises while no work is provided by the employer. (B) All time during which an employee is required to be on call for emergency service at a location designated by the employer shall be considered to be working time and shall be paid for as such, whether or not the employee is actually called upon to work. (C) When an employee is subject to call for emergency service but is not required to be at a location designated by the employer but is simply required to keep the employer informed as to the location at which he may be contacted, or when an employee is not specifically required by his employer to be subject to call but is contacted by his employer or on the employer's authorization directly or indirectly and assigned to duty, working time shall begin when the employee is notified of his assignment and shall end when the employee has completed his assignment;
(3) "Employee" means employee as defined in section 31-58.
(1967, P.A. 493, S. 1; 1972, P.A. 116, S. 2; P.A. 80-64, S. 3, 7.)
History: 1972 act made technical change; P.A. 80-64 deleted references to repealed Sec. 31-76d in Subparas. (E) and (G) of Subdiv. (1).
Cited. 160 C. 133, 138. Scope of federal preemption discussed and determined. 164 C. 233.
Subdiv. (1):
Cited. 16 CA 437, 443, 444.
Subdiv. (2):
Subpara. (A) cited. 16 CA 437, 443.

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Sec. 31-76c. Length of workweek. No employer, except as otherwise provided herein, shall employ any of his employees for a workweek longer than forty hours, unless such employee receives remuneration for his employment in excess of the hours above specified at a rate not less than one and one-half times the regular rate at which he is employed.
(1967, P.A. 493, S. 2.)
Scope of federal preemption discussed and determined. 164 C. 233. Cited. 219 C. 520, 522, 525, 528. Cited. 223 C. 573, 583, 584, 586.
Cited. 16 CA 437, 443.

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Sec. 31-76d. Workweek for certain establishments. Section 31-76d is repealed.
(1967, P.A. 493, S. 3; 1969, P.A. 731; P.A. 80-64, S. 2, 7.)

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Sec. 31-76e. Maximum workweek under contract or collective bargaining agreement. No employer shall be deemed to have violated section 31-76c by employing any employee for a workweek in excess of the maximum workweek applicable to such employee if such employee is employed pursuant to a bona fide individual contract, or pursuant to an agreement made as a result of collective bargaining by representatives of employees, if the duties of such employee necessitate irregular hours of work, and the contract or agreement (1) specifies a regular rate of pay of not less than the minimum hourly rate provided in subsection (j) of section 31-58 and compensation at not less than one and one-half times such rate for all hours worked in excess of such maximum workweek, and (2) provides a weekly guaranty of pay for not more than sixty hours based on the rates so specified.
(1967, P.A. 493, S. 4; P.A. 80-64, S. 4, 7.)
History: P.A. 80-64 deleted reference to repealed Sec. 31-76d.
Scope of federal preemption discussed and determined. 164 C. 233.

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Sec. 31-76f. Piece rates; two or more kinds of work. No employer shall be deemed to have violated section 31-76c by employing any employee for a workweek in excess of the maximum workweek applicable to such employee if, pursuant to an agreement or understanding arrived at between the employer and the employee before performance of work, the amount paid to the employee for the number of hours worked by him in such workweek in excess of the maximum workweek applicable to such employee under section 31-76c: (A) In the case of an employee employed at piece rates, is computed at piece rates not less than one and one-half times the bona fide piece rates applicable to the same work when performed during nonovertime hours; or (B) in the case of an employee performing two or more kinds of work for which different hourly or piece rates have been established, is computed at rates not less than one and one- half times such bona fide rates applicable to the same work when performed during nonovertime hours; and if (i) the employee's average hourly earnings for the workweek exclusive of payments described in subparagraphs (A) to (G), inclusive, of subdivision (1) of section 31-76b are not less than the minimum hourly rate required by applicable law, and (ii) extra overtime compensation is properly computed and paid on other forms of additional pay required to be included in computing the regular rate.
(1967, P.A. 493, S. 5; P.A. 80-64, S. 5, 7.)
History: P.A. 80-64 deleted references to repealed Sec. 31-76d.
Scope of federal preemption discussed and determined. 164 C. 233.

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Sec. 31-76g. Crediting of certain extra compensation. Extra compensation paid as described in subparagraphs (E), (F) and (G) of subdivision (1) of section 31-76b shall be creditable toward overtime compensation payable pursuant to sections 31-76b to 31- 76j, inclusive.
(1967, P.A. 493, S. 6.)
Scope of federal preemption discussed and determined. 164 C. 233.

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Sec. 31-76h. Hospital employees. No employer engaged in the operation of a hospital shall be deemed to have violated section 31-76c if, pursuant to an agreement or understanding arrived at between the employer and the employee before performance of the work, a work period of fourteen consecutive days is accepted in lieu of the workweek of seven consecutive days for purposes of overtime computation and if, for his employment in excess of eight hours in any workday and in excess of eighty hours in such fourteen-day period, the employee receives compensation at a rate not less than one and one-half times the regular rate at which he is employed.
(1967, P.A. 493, S. 7; P.A. 80-64, S. 6, 7.)
History: P.A. 80-64 deleted reference to repealed Sec. 31-76d.
Scope of federal preemption discussed and determined. 164 C. 233.

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Sec. 31-76i. Exceptions. The provisions of sections 31-76b to 31-76j, inclusive, shall not apply with respect to (a) any driver or helper, excluding drivers or helpers employed by exempt employers, with respect to whom the Interstate Commerce Commission or its successor agency or the Secretary of Transportation has power to establish qualifications and maximum hours of service pursuant to the provisions of applicable federal law or regulation of any employee of a carrier by air subject to the Railway Labor Act or any employee of any employer subject to said Railway Labor Act; (b) any employee employed as a seaman; (c) any employee employed as an announcer, a news editor or chief engineer by a radio station or television station; (d) repealed by 1972, P.A. 116, S. 3, 6; (e) any person employed in a bona fide executive, administrative or professional capacity as defined in the regulations of the Labor Commissioner issued pursuant to section 31-60; (f) any person employed in the capacity of outside salesman as defined in the regulations of the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act; (g) any inside salesperson whose sole duty is to sell a product or service (1) whose regular rate of pay is in excess of two times the minimum hourly rate applicable to him under section 31- 58, (2) more than half of whose compensation for a representative period, being not less than one month, represents commissions on goods or services, and (3) who does not work more than fifty-four hours during a work week of seven consecutive calendar days. In determining the proportion of compensation representing commissions, all earnings resulting from the application of a bona fide commission rate shall be deemed commissions on goods or services without regard to whether the computed commissions exceed the draw or guarantee; (h) any person employed as a taxicab driver by any employer engaged in the business of operating a taxicab, if such driver is paid forty per cent or more of the fares recorded on the meter of the taxicab operated by him; (i) any person employed in the capacity of a household delivery route salesman engaged in delivering milk or bakery products to consumers and who is paid on a commission basis as defined in the regulations of the Labor Commissioner issued pursuant to section 31-60; (j) any salesman primarily engaged in selling automobiles. For the purposes of this subsection, "salesman" includes any person employed by a licensed new car dealer (1) whose primary duty is to sell maintenance and repair services, (2) whose regular rate of pay is in excess of two times the minimum hourly rate applicable to him under the provisions of section 31-58, (3) more than half of whose compensation for a representative period, being not less than one month, represents commissions on goods or services and (4) who does not work more than fifty-four hours during a work week of seven consecutive days. In determining the proportion of compensation representing commissions, all earnings resulting from the application of a bona fide commission rate shall be deemed commissions on goods or services without regard to whether the computed commissions exceed the draw or guarantee; (k) any person employed in agriculture; (l) any permanent paid members of the uniformed police force of municipalities and permanent paid members of the uniformed firefighters of municipalities; (m) any person employed as a firefighter by a private nonprofit corporation which on May 24, 1984, has a valid contract with any municipality to extinguish fires and protect its inhabitants from loss by fire; (n) any person, except a person paid on an hourly basis, employed as a beer delivery truck driver by a licensed distributor, as defined by section 12-433; or (o) any person employed as a mechanic primarily engaged in the servicing of motor vehicles, as defined in section 14-1, or farm implements, as defined in section 14-1, by a nonmanufacturing employer primarily engaged in the business of selling such vehicles or implements to consumers, to the extent that such employees are exempt under the federal Wage-Hour and Equal Pay Act, 29 USC 201 et seq. and 29 USC 213(b)(10), provided such person's actual weekly earnings exceed an amount equal to the total of (1) such person's basic contractual hourly rate of pay times the number of hours such person has actually worked plus (2) such person's basic contractual hourly rate of pay times one-half the number of hours such person has actually worked in excess of forty hours in such week. For the purposes of this section, "basic contractual hourly rate" means the compensation payable to a person at an hourly rate separate from and exclusive of any flat rate, incentive rate or any other basis of calculation.
(1967, P.A. 493, S. 8; 1969, P.A. 547, S. 1; 548; 1971, P.A. 93; 448, S. 1, 2; 615, S. 4; 1972, P.A. 116, S. 3−5; P.A. 73-82, S. 1, 2, 4; P.A. 84-234, S. 1, 2; P.A. 89-24, S. 1, 2; P.A. 90-55, S. 2, 3; P.A. 95-357, S. 1; P.A. 96-222, S. 21, 41.)
History: 1969 acts substituted "driver, excluding drivers employed by exempt employers" for "employee" in Subdiv. (a) and added additional exclusions for certain persons employed in outside sales, certain persons determined by amount and manner of payment and by hours worked and taxi drivers in new Subdivs. (f), (g) and (h); 1971 acts excluded household delivery route salesmen delivering milk, automobile salesmen and agricultural employees in new Subdivs. (i), (j) and (k); 1972 act repealed Subdiv. (d) which had excluded persons employed in manufacturing establishments subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act, included persons delivering bakery products in Subdiv. (i) and added Subdiv. (l) excluding permanent paid municipal policemen and firemen; P.A. 73-82 changed exclusion for outside salesmen to refer to those defined as such in regulation of Fair Labor Standards Act rather than those defined as such in commissioner's regulations who receive at least one hundred times the minimum hourly rate applicable to them under Sec. 31-58 and amended Subdiv. (g) to specifically exclude outside salesmen; P.A. 84-234 added Subdiv. (m) providing that fire fighters employed by private nonprofit corporations having contracts with any municipality on May 24, 1984, to extinguish fires are exempted from Secs. 31-76b to 31-76j, inclusive; P.A. 89-24 substituted "inside salesperson whose sole duty is to sell a product or service" for "employee except outside salesmen" in Subdiv. (g) and added Subdiv. (n) concerning certain beer delivery truck drivers; P.A. 90-55 added Subdiv. (o) providing that certain automotive mechanics are exempted from Secs. 31-76b to 31-76j, inclusive; P.A. 95-357 amended Subdiv. (j) by adding a definition of "salesman"; P.A. 96-222 inserted "or its successor agency" after "Interstate Commerce Commission", effective July 1, 1996.
See Sec. 31-76l re adoption of applicable regulations.
Cited. 160 C. 133, 139. Scope of federal preemption discussed and determined. 164 C. 233. Cited. 219 C. 520−522, 524, 528.
Subdiv. (f):
Cited. 219 C. 520, 527.
Subdiv. (g):
Subpara. (1) cited. 219 C. 520, 523, 526, 528. Subpara. (3) cited. Id. Subpara. (2) cited. Id., 520, 523−529. "Commission ... on services" includes commissions earned for performing services as well as those earned for selling services. Id., 520−528.
Subdiv. (i):
Cited. 219 C. 520, 526, 527.
Subdiv. (j):
Cited. 219 C. 520, 526.

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Sec. 31-76j. Prior wage orders and regulations. All wage orders and administrative regulations in effect on July 1, 1967, based upon a workweek other than the workweek herein established are amended consistent with sections 31-76b to 31-76j, inclusive.
(1967, P.A. 493, S. 9.)
Scope of federal preemption discussed and determined. 164 C. 233.

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Sec. 31-76k. Payment of fringe benefits upon termination of employment. If an employer policy or collective bargaining agreement provides for the payment of accrued fringe benefits upon termination, including but not limited to paid vacations, holidays, sick days and earned leave, and an employee is terminated without having received such accrued fringe benefits, such employee shall be compensated for such accrued fringe benefits exclusive of normal pension benefits in the form of wages in accordance with such agreement or policy but in no case less than the earned average rate for the accrual period pursuant to sections 31-71a to 31-71i, inclusive.
(P.A. 78-340.)
Cited. 238 C. 809.
Cited. 27 CA 800, 801, 803, 805−807.

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Sec. 31-76l. Regulations. The Labor Commissioner shall adopt regulations in accordance with the provisions of chapter 54 to implement the provisions of section 31-76i.
(P.A. 95-357, S. 2.)

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Sec. 31-76m. Remission of portion of fine or civil penalty to municipality. Notwithstanding any other provisions of the general statutes, if the Labor Commissioner imposes a fine or civil penalty under the provisions of section 31-15, 31-16, 31-18, 31- 23, 31-24, 31-25, 31-52, 31-53, 31-54, 31-69, 31-69a, 31-76 or 31-76a, as a result of a violation initially reported by a municipal official, the commissioner shall, within thirty days after collecting such fine or penalty, remit one-half of the amount collected to such municipality.
(P.A. 97-263, S. 21.)

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